Action on Smoking and Health

Tag Archives: tobacco


ASH Daily News for 5 September 2018

UK

  • Doncaster: Man sentenced for smuggling illegal tobacco
  • What are the health risks of hookah smoking?

International

  • Tobacco control is ‘major component’ of environmental protection efforts
  • US: Chain pharmacies sell tobacco to minors
  • US: Kentucky expands efforts to help people give up tobacco
  • Macau: Resort approved for smoking lounges

UK

Doncaster: Man sentenced for smuggling illegal tobacco

A man from Doncaster has been sentenced after 850kg of illegal tobacco was discovered in the back of a hired van when officers visited a rented storage unit. The tobacco represented £153,300 in unpaid duty.

Eden Noblett, Assistant Director at the Fraud Investigation Service, HMRC said: “Brennan aimed to put this illegal tobacco on the UK streets and pocket the profit, which was enough money to pay the salaries for six trainee firefighters for a year. He thought he could get away with it, but he was wrong. The black market trade in illegal tobacco…is stealing money from taxpayers that is needed for public services we rely on. I encourage anyone with information on this type of fraud to report it to HMRC online, or contact our Fraud Hotline.”

Source: The Star, 4 September 2018

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What are the health risks of hookah smoking?

Using a hookah pipe (also known as a water pipe or shisha) exposes a person to tobacco smoke, which contains harmful components, such as carbon monoxide. The water in the hookah does not filter out these components. Even if a person does not smoke directly from the hookah, they can still inhale secondhand smoke.

As with all tobacco smoking, hookah smoking increases the risk of lung and heart conditions, as well as cancer.

Source: Medical News Today, 4 September 2018

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International

Tobacco control is ‘major component’ of environmental protection efforts

The head of the UN tobacco control watchdog has said that tobacco production and its use by consumers is “tremendously destructive” for the environment, although control measures could curb its effects.

According to a report by the FCTC Secretariat and the UN Development Programme (UNDP), tobacco crops require large amounts of chemical fertilizers and pesticides, which pollute the ground and nearby waterways. The production process also presents serious health hazards for farmers and their families. Growing tobacco leads to accelerated soil degradation, and is a major cause of pollution. Moreover, cigarette butts have become the most discarded waste item worldwide, with some 4.5 trillion thrown away each year. This represents 1.69 billion pounds of toxic rubbish annually.

The Secretariat of the WHO FCTC is therefore calling on governments to better regulate tobacco agriculture and to work on helping tobacco farmers worldwide, switch to environmentally-friendly alternative crop production. This is being encouraged through the use of incentives such as access to credit, and by providing training on environmentally-friendly practices, among other measures.

See also:
The WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control, An accelerator for sustainable development

Source: Government World, 4 September 2018

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US: Chain pharmacies sell tobacco to minors

A new study has found that over the past six years, the US Food and Drug Administration has caught several chain pharmacies selling tobacco products to minors. The biggest offender, Walgreens, sold products to minors 1,296 times, representing about once in every 10 inspections between 2012 and 2017.

Arnold Levinson from the Colorado School of Public Health in Aurora, who wasn’t involved in the research, said “The FDA data are the best we have available, but they only measure how often the pharmacies got caught selling tobacco to minors during undercover enforcement tests…The problem is much bigger than these results suggest. If pharmacies are serious about being in the health business, they need to stop selling this deadly product – and not just to kids.”

See also:
JAMA Pediatrics, US Food and Drug Administration inspection of tobacco sales to minors at top pharmacies, 2012-2017

Source: Reuters, 4 September 2018

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US: Kentucky expands efforts to help people give up tobacco

Kentucky has the the US’ second-highest smoking rate, with 24.6 percent of the state’s residents reporting daily tobacco use. The state’s public health department says more than 8,000 Kentuckians die each year due to tobacco-related diseases, including lung cancer.

A new public information campaign by the Department for Public Health is therefore attempting to help people quit. The campaign includes broadcast, print and digital ads, and also features outreach to medical providers and community engagement initiatives aimed at boosting public awareness.

The program offers a free tobacco quit line — 1-800-QUIT NOW. The statewide telephone service provides free counselling and support for people wanting to stop smoking or using other tobacco products.

Source: Associated Press, 4 September 2018

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Macau: Resort approved for smoking lounges

‘Studio City’ resort has become the second casino in Macau to receive authorisation to provide smoking lounges. Smoking on casino floors was banned by the Macau government in October 2014. However, an exception for smoking lounges that didn’t offer gaming activity was made.

Now, all casinos that want to continue to offer on-site smoking in the new year must apply to the city’s Health Bureau for authorisation. Out of the 47 casinos and slot parlors in Macau, 13 have already applied for authorisation to operate smoking lounges.

Source: Calvin Ayre, 31 August 2018

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ASH Daily News for 31 August 2018

UK

  • Number of over-65s needing 24-hour care ‘to rise by third over next 20 years’
  • Wales: Highest UK rates of smoking in pregnancy is cause for concern
  • Terminally ill cancer patient shows effects of smoking 300,000 cigarettes in a lifetime
  • Opinion: Tobacco’s love of social media shows it can’t be trusted

International

  • Israel: Ban on smoking in public places to see significant expansion
  • Philippines: Smoking in public prohibited on Boracay island
  • Russia: Decline in tobacco deaths
  • US: More Americans are quitting smoking for good

Links of the week

  • #BinTheButt
  • Where there’s smoke…

UK

Number of over-65s needing 24-hour care ‘to rise by third over next 20 years’

The number of adults aged 65 and over needing round-the-clock care will rise by over a third to more than one million during the next 20 years, experts have suggested. Moreover, the research indicates the number of over-85s requiring 24-hour care will almost double to 446,000 in England by 2035.

Researchers used the Population Ageing and Care Simulation (PACSim) model to examine changing levels of dependency in older people. PACSim accounts for multiple risk factors for dependence and disability, including a wide range of sociodemographic factors (such as level of education) and health behaviours (for example, smoking status and physical activity), as well as 12 chronic diseases and geriatric conditions including coronary heart disease, stroke, hypertension, diabetes, arthritis, cancer and depression.

See also:
The Lancet, Forecasting the care needs of the older population in England over the next 20 years: estimates from the Population Ageing and Care Simulation (PACSim) modelling study
The Independent, Social care crisis: Over-85s needing 24 hour care set to double by 2035, major study shows
BBC News, Numbers of elderly in 24-hour care set to double by 2035

Source: The Telegraph, 31 August 2018

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Wales: Highest UK rates of smoking in pregnancy is cause for concern

An estimated 11,864 unborn babies are exposed to harm from tobacco smoke each year in Wales. And worryingly, as many as 16% of women continue to smoke throughout their pregnancy – the highest of all the UK nations. Midwives across Wales are therefore raising awareness of the dangers of smoking and providing access to support to help pregnant women quit.

Smoking in pregnancy puts both mother and baby at risk of significant harm. It doubles the chances of the baby being stillborn or having a heart defect. Even secondhand smoke can have a devastating effect on the health of the child – increasing the chances of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) by 45%.

Kate Evans, public health specialist midwife at Neath Port Talbot Hospital, said: “We know a high percentage of pregnant women smoke. We already work with mums-to-be who smoke and know how hard it can be to quit. We also appreciate the bravery of taking that step to seek help and as midwives we want to reassure women that we are here to support and advise, not judge. If you are pregnant and smoking please discuss it with your midwife who will be able to signpost you to cessation support to enable you to quit. Quit for you, quit for your baby.”

Source: Wales Online, 28 August 2018

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Terminally ill cancer patient shows effects of smoking 300,000 cigarettes in a lifetime

Anthony Pillage, a 57-year old from Coventry, has shared harrowing pictures and videos documenting his final months, following his battle with terminal cancer. The pictures and videos have received more than a quarter of a million views.

Anthony smoked more than 300,000 cigarettes in his life. He started smoking at the age of 17 due to peer pressure, and continued for a further 36 years, at times going through 40 cigarettes (two packets) a day. He was diagnosed with a thymic carcinoma, a rare cancer that grew to the size of a grapefruit and engulfed his heart and lung.

“I put up a video where I had very bad pain and couldn’t breathe online to show the perils of smoking, within two days it hit 100,000 views,” Anthony said. “Over 600 people have said they have given up smoking and the way they have written it I believe them. Even more pledged to see a doctor about cessation. I’m not sure how many months I have left, but the message I have is a powerful one and I want to make some good of the time I have left.”

Source: Metro, 30 August 2018

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Opinion: Tobacco’s love of social media shows it can’t be trusted

Ben Williams, author at The London Economic, takes a look at insidious tobacco advertising techniques.

“New research has shown the tobacco giants have a new favourite marketing trick: using Instagram influencers as Trojan horses to infiltrate the youth market. The findings only reinforce the view that the industry will stop at nothing to maintain sales, despite its products’ rather unfortunate tendency to kill its customers. As the world’s powers gather to discuss how to regulate the industry and stop tobacco smuggling, it’s critical that they keep this in mind.

The newly published study, funded by the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids (CTFK) and led by California PR expert Robert Kozinets, analysed over 100 social media campaigns by the ‘big four’ – Philip Morris International, British American Tobacco, Japan Tobacco International and Imperial Brands. The researchers conducted anonymous interviews with several Instagram stars who had been paid by the quartet, and found that the tobacconists’ PR teams were training them in what slogans to push, then sending them off to take selfies at glitzy parties emblazoned with corporate branding. In total, these campaigns had racked up over 25 million views worldwide.”

See also:
Campaign for Tobacco Free Kids, New Investigation Exposes How Tobacco Companies Market Cigarettes on Social Media in the U.S. and Around the World

Source: The London Economic, 30 August 2018

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International

Israel: Ban on smoking in public places to see significant expansion

New Health Ministry rules significantly expanding the smoking ban in public places will come into effect on the 1st of September 2018.

Under the new Health Ministry guidelines, smoking will be entirely prohibited — including in any previously specially designated areas — in government offices, courts, religious councils, hospitals and clinics. It will also be banned at concerts, conferences, demonstrations and any open-air event of more than 50 people, swimming pools, open-air sports facilities, playgrounds, zoos, entrances to preschools and in closed car parks. Moreover, institutions will be allowed to set a non-smoking area at a distance of 10 meters from the entrance.

Local municipality inspectors will be authorised to hand out fines of NIS 1,000 to private individuals and NIS 5,000 to owners of public spaces where the rules are broken. The move was pushed by the Health Ministry after years of accusations of inaction in the face of an epidemic that claims thousands of lives in Israel every year.

Source: The Times of Israel, 31 August 2018

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Philippines: Smoking in public prohibited on Boracay island

The Philippines’ Department of Tourism Secretary Bernadette Romulo-Puyat has prohibited smoking in public places on the island of Boracay. The ban covers not only the beach but other public places in Boracay. ASH Philippines, the Philippine’s Framework Convention on Tobacco Control Alliance (FCAP), and the Ecowaste Coalition have commended the decision.

“We laud Sec. Puyat for her recent pronouncement that the island of Boracay will now be smokefree. She is the only Secretary that has the audacity to implement this policy and this only goes to show that she is a true servant of the Filipino people,” said Roberto Del Rosario, ASH President.

Meanwhile, the green-group Ecowaste Coalition said that it welcomes the DOT’s initiative, which will protect urban, rural and marine ecosystems from cigarette butts. “Although small and lightweight, cigarette butts take several years to degrade, contain many harmful chemicals, pose environmental health risks, and waste public funds for cleanup and disposal,” said Aileen Lucero, National Coordinator for Ecowaste Coalition.

Source: EcoWaste Coalition, 31 August 2018

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Russia: Decline in tobacco deaths

Life expectancy in Russia between 1994 and 2016 increased by more than 7 years, according to the most extensive health study on the nation ever conducted. The study found that age-adjusted rates of premature death from smoking dropped by nearly 34% over the same time period.

“These are significant accomplishments,” said Dr. Mohsen Naghavi, a professor of health metrics sciences at the University of Washington. “Russia’s public health officials deserve recognition for their efforts lowering the country’s burden of disease.”

However, the study suggests the nation continues to face considerable health challenges. Researchers found that more than half of all deaths in Russia are attributable to behavioural risk factors, such as smoking, alcohol use, dietary risks, low physical activity, drug use, and unsafe sex.

See also:
The Lancet, Burden of disease in Russia, 1980-2016: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2016

Source: Science Magazine, 31 August 2018

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US: More Americans are quitting smoking for good

The overall smoking rate among US adults has hit an all-time low, according to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Preliminary data from the National Health Interview Survey showed that smoking rates declined from 15.5% in 2016 to 13.9% in 2017.

“Cigarette smoking among adults has been on a downward trajectory for decades,” said Brian King, deputy director for research translation in the CDC’s Office on Smoking and Health. “It’s the lowest percentage we’ve seen since we started monitoring smoking rates in 1965.” The decline has been the combined result of a suite of tobacco control measures including taxation, public health campaigns, smokefree laws, and access to smoking cessation programs.

However, 34 million Americans still smoke, and an estimated 480,000 Americans still die each year as a result of smoking and secondhand smoke exposure. Dr. Charlie Shaeffer, a California-based cardiologist who has been active in tobacco control efforts, warned that “The numbers have declined but seem to be plateauing.”

Source: Medical Xpress, August 30 2018

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Links of the week

#BinTheButt

Cigarette litter causes significant damage to marine life. Yet only 53% of Brits think that cigarette butts get washed into the sea if they get dropped, blown or washed down the drain. Dropped cigarette butts are the most common form of littering seen across the UK, and just under 39% smokers – equivalent to 3.6 million in the UK – admit to throwing a cigarette butt down a drain within the past month. 11% of smokers do not even consider cigarette butts to be litter.

This week, Keep Britain Tidy has therefore launched a new campaign to tackle cigarette related litter, urging smokers to #BinTheButt. The aim of the campaign is to raise awareness amongst smokers and highlight the link between the cigarette butt they drop on the street or down the drain and the impact it has on the marine environment.

Source: Keep Britain Tidy

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Where there’s smoke…

TakeAPart, in collaboration with the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids (CTFK), is raising awareness about the deceptive strategies deployed by tobacco companies to get the next generation addicted to cigarettes.

CTFK research has found that tobacco companies are secretly paying social media stars to advertise their brand on people’s newsfeeds. Philip Morris International, British American Tobacco, Japan Tobacco International and Imperial Brands are all subverting tobacco advertising laws, flying under the radar of government regulators and abusing the policies of social media platforms to market cigarettes to youth. It’s all part of a deceptive strategy to get the next generation addicted.

Source: TakeAPart

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ASH Daily News for 21 August 2018

UK

  • Bristol shopkeeper jailed for 31 months for illicit tobacco
  • Fresh ‘Keep it Out Campaign’

International

  • India: New images for pictorial warnings and mandatory ‘quit line’ number on tobacco product packs
  • Turkey considers strict new measures to curb smoking rates

UK

Bristol shopkeeper jailed for 31 months for illicit tobacco

A Bristol shopkeeper is facing a prison sentence for being found with over 700,000 illicit cigarettes. The resale value was £1 million and in total nearly £230,000 in duty was evaded. HMRC used sniffer dogs which helped uncover a massive stash of illicit tobacco in a self-storage unit.

Source: Bristol Post, 20 August 2018

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Fresh ‘Keep it Out Campaign’

BBC’s You and Yours programme ran a piece on the Fresh “Keep It Out” campaign, focussing education initiatives in the North East and of the impact of illegal tobacco. The section with Fresh starts at 27 minutes 42 seconds in. Durham Trading Standards are also interviewed and they highlight the effectiveness of the Fresh campaign.

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International

India: New images for pictorial warnings and mandatory ‘quit line’ number on tobacco product packs

The health ministry has issued new images for the pictorial warnings on cigarette packs and other tobacco products. The images will have to be accompanied with a mandatory quit line number. The government has released two separate sets of pictorial warning images, which will each be used for 12 months. The rules apply to both manufactured and imported cigarettes. India has more than 100 million smokers and the government says smoking kills nearly a million people every year.

Source: The Times of India, 21 August 2018

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Turkey considers strict new measures to curb smoking rates

The Turkish government is considering a range of new laws designed to reduce tobacco consumption. Potential measures include raising the age of purchase to 21, increasing taxes on tobacco products, running public health campaigns to increase awareness about the risks of smoking and stricter controls over smoking in enclosed spaces.

One of the proposals is particularly striking: to introduce positive discrimination for non-smoking employees by increasing their annual leave and taxing them at a lower rate.

Source: Ahval, 20 August 2018

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ASH Daily News for 8 August 2018

International

  • US: FDA to support development of nicotine replacement therapies
  • US: Tobacco-funded group sues over Montana tax measure
  • US: American Medical Association calls for greater e-cigarette regulation

International

US: FDA to support development of nicotine replacement therapies

The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has revealed plans to support the development of new nicotine replacement therapies (NRTs) to help eliminate addiction to combustible cigarettes.

The public health agency aims to also create policies that will regulate the use of nicotine and tobacco in the country with a focus on implementing measures to help existing addicted smokers stop using combustible cigarettes. Specifically, the FDA will work towards developing new forms of nicotine delivery that are in line with its public health goals.

FDA commissioner Scott Gottlieb said: “Part of this work requires that we recognise that nicotine, while highly addictive, is delivered through products posing a continuum of risk – with combustible cigarettes at one end, to nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) products at the other. We’re working on multiple fronts to recognise the role that more novel forms of nicotine delivery could play in achieving our public health goals, as part of an appropriately regulated marketplace.”

Source: Pharmaceutical Technology, 7 August 2018

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US: Tobacco-funded group sues over Montana tax measure

An initiative in Montana is seeking to raise the state’s tax on a pack of cigarettes by $2 to $3.70, on snuff to at least $3.70 per 1.2-ounce can and tax e-cigarettes and vaping products for the first time. The new revenue, estimated to reach $74 million a year by 2023, would be used to pay for the state’s share of Medicaid expansion and stop smoking programmes.

Voters will decide whether to introduce the tax in November, but a tobacco industry-funded group wants to change the wording of the citizen’s ballot in an effort to prevent the increase. A lawsuit filed with the Montana Supreme Court Monday by ‘Montanans Against Tax Hikes’ takes issue with specific phrasing contained in the 135-word ballot statement. It claims that the language is incorrect, will cause confusion and prevent voters from casting an informed ballot.

“Big Tobacco will try anything to protect their profits at the expense of Montana’s health,” said Amanda Cahill, a spokeswoman for the pro-initiative group and a campaigner for the American Heart Association. “Pursuing an unnecessary legal challenge while wasting taxpayer dollars appears to be part of Big Tobacco’s playbook nationwide — it’s unfortunate to see it happening Montana.”

Source: Associated Press, 7 August 2018

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US: American Medical Association calls for greater e-cigarette regulation

The American Medical Association (AMA) has adopted several policies to improve the regulation of tobacco products, including e-cigarettes.

The AMA is urging the federal government to move quickly to regulate e-cigarettes and require manufacturers to list the ingredients and nicotine content clearly on product labels, as well as a warning of the addictive quality of nicotine. In addition, the association says that the sale of any e-cigarette cartridge that does not include a complete list of ingredients on its packaging (in the order of prevalence) should be prohibited.

“We are concerned that consumers have an inaccurate reflection of the amount of nicotine and type of substances they’re inhaling when using e-cigarettes,” AMA President Barbara L. McAneny, M.D., said in a statement. “The AMA will continue to advocate for more stringent policies to help keep all harmful tobacco products, including e-cigarettes, out of the hands of our nation’s youth.”

Editorial note: UK regulation already requires e-cigarette packaging to list the nicotine content and ingredients. An expert review of the latest evidence for PHE concludes that e-cigarettes are around 95% safer than smoked tobacco and they can help smokers to quit.

Source: Medical Xpress, 7 August 2018

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ASH Daily News for 17 July 2018

UK

  • US e-cigarette group Juul launches in Britain
  • Blackburn: Smokers supported to stop smoking on Hospital site
  • Essex: Plastic box being used as an ashtray starts fire in block of flats
  • Blackpool: Pregnant smokers to get vouchers as part of new Stop Smoking Service
  • Sunderland: School pupils hope anti-smoking film will go viral

International

  • India: Tobacco companies fight pictorial warnings in Supreme Court

UK

US e-cigarette group Juul launches in Britain

The San Francisco vaping start-up, Juul, launched in the UK on Tuesday, gaining access to the second-largest e-cigarette market in the world. Since launching in 2015, Juul now accounts for approximately 70% of all e-cigarette sales in the US.

The company has dedicated itself to eliminating “combustible cigarettes from the face of the earth”, and wants to help the £7.4 million smokers in the UK transition to less harmful forms of nicotine consumption and ultimately stop smoking altogether.

Deborah Arnott, chief executive of Action on Smoking and Health (ASH) in the UK, said: “e-cigarette use in the UK has stagnated since 2013, to the detriment of public health. If Juul takes off in the UK as it did in the US it could reboot the market and hasten the arrival of the smoke-free future we’re all hoping for.”

Source: Financial Times, 17 July 2018

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Blackburn: Smokers supported to stop smoking on Hospital site

Senior figures at East Lancashire Hospitals Trust (ELHT) are offering smokers at Royal Blackburn Hospital support to help them quit.

Kevin McGee, chief executive of the ELHT, said: “What we now do is challenge in a very positive way anybody that does smoke and offer them support and offer them help. What I would say to anyone is to respect that this is a no smoking site.”

Source: This is Lancashire, 17 July 2018

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Essex: Plastic box being used as an ashtray starts fire in block of flats

Fire crews have identified a plastic box being used as an ashtray as the cause of a small fire in a block of flats in Westbourne Grove, Essex.

No one was injured and smoke damage was limited to the stairwell where the box was located.

A spokesman from the fire service said: “This incident could have been worse if the fire had spread; cigarettes are the most deadly cause of house fires and this incident shows how important it is to ensure they are put right out in a suitable ashtray.”

Source: Echo News, 17 July 2018

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Blackpool: Pregnant smokers to get vouchers as part of new Stop Smoking Service

Pregnant smokers in Blackpool could receive shopping vouchers and other incentives to give up smoking. This is one of a number of schemes being considered by health officials in the resort, which has a smoking in pregnancy rate of 27.8%, the highest in the UK.

The proposed new stop smoking service will offer more support to smokers to help them quit, including advice in leaflets and websites, advice on nicotine replacement therapies, and access to helplines in a bid to make the service more accessible.

Councillor Amy Cross, Blackpool Council’s cabinet member for reducing health inequalities, said: “Supporting mothers-to-be to quit smoking during pregnancy helps give unborn children a good, healthy and fair start in life. Smoking during pregnancy is a major health problem and is associated with various adverse effects during pregnancy, including an increased risk of miscarriage, premature birth, low birthweight and stillbirth.”

Source: Blackpool Gazette, 17 July 2018

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Sunderland: School pupils hope anti-smoking film will go viral

Pupils from Whitburn Church of England Academy in Sunderland, have produced an anti-smoking film they hope will go viral. The video was produced as part of a campaign led by South Tyneside Council and the Customs House Theatre who worked with students across the region to develop a creative campaign persuading peers to say no to smoking.

A 2017 borough health survey found smoking rates of 5% for Year 8 pupils (12-13) and 11% for Year 11 pupils (15-16), with 11% of primary school pupils stating that someone they live with smoked in the same room as them.

Councillor Tracey Dixon, lead member for independence and wellbeing, said: “Who better to lead the fight against tobacco than our creative young people! I think it’s fantastic that these students are leading the way in South Tyneside.”

Source: Sunderland Echo, 17 July 2018

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International

India: Tobacco companies fight pictorial warnings in Supreme Court

Tobacco industry representatives have objected to a recent Supreme Court decision to increase the size of pictorial warnings on tobacco packaging from 40% of the pack size to 85%.

The Court’s decision was motivated by a petition to help consumers take informed choices when purchasing tobacco. One of the main advantages of pictorial warnings compared to warning messages is that they convey the dangers of tobacco to people who are illiterate.

The Court justified the policy on the grounds that: “[the government] want the pictorial message to be such that it would inform consumers about the evil effects of the product.”

Source: Times of India, 17 July 2018

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ASH Daily News for 27 June 2018

UK

  • North-East: NHS not doing enough to help smokers, says Fresh
  • Cheshire: Sniffer dogs uncover £12000 of illegal cigarettes in raids
  • East Dunbartonshire: Poster plea to be smokefree
  • Strong public support for public health interventions

International

  • Germany: Do smoking bans lead to more or less smoking in the home?
  • US: NYC public health department targets Chinese men
  • Mexico: Children still toil in tobacco fields as reforms fail to fix poverty
  • Opinion: How we can fight child labour in the tobacco industry
  • Opinion: Stop rising tobacco use in Africa and the Middle East

UK

North-East: NHS not doing enough to help smokers, says Fresh

The tobacco control group Fresh, thetobacco control programme in the North-East, has backed calls from the Royal College of Physicians for the NHS to offer smokers routine support to quit when they receive hospital care, regardless of their condition.

Fresh said it would support the broader work led by local authorities and complement their local community stop smoking services.

Ailsa Rutter, Director of Fresh, said: “Smoking is our biggest killer and cause of ill health. “Our doctors, nurses and GPs are in a unique position to alter the course of a patient’s long term health and help them to quit. Not doing so means we are failing our patients. The evidence is strong that helping smokers to stop is very cost effective, saves lives and will save the NHS millions of pounds, and will help the North-East get to a point when five per cent or fewer people smoke.”

Source: Darlington & Stockton Times, 27 June 2018

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Cheshire: Sniffer dogs uncover £12000 of illegal cigarettes in raids

Around £12,000 of illegal cigarettes and tobacco has been seized after raids on several properties.

Cheshire East Council’s trading standards officers have carried out the operations, with the aid of sniffer dogs, at premises in Crewe and Macclesfield. More than 50,000 cigarettes were discovered after they had been concealed in places such as a false wall, in light fittings and under floor boards. The seizure followed a tip-off that cigarettes were secretly being stored in a number of residential and business locations.

Councillor Janet Clowes, Cheshire East Council cabinet member with responsibility for safer communities, said: “As an enforcing council, we work hard to keep harmful products off the streets and will crack down on businesses, criminal gangs or individuals who flout the law. All tobacco is harmful but the illegal black market in tobacco, and in particular the availability of cheap cigarettes, makes it harder for smokers to quit and remain smoke free.

Source: Stoke on Trent Live

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East Dunbartonshire: Poster plea to be smokefree

Local primary schools took part in tobacco workshops, led by the East Dunbartonshire Tobacco Alliance, before participating in a competition to design a poster to deter smoking within play parks, urging adults not to smoke where children play. The winning poster will soon be displayed in all parks across Bishopbriggs and Auchinairn in the latest drive to stamp out smoking in East Dunbartonshire.

Smokefree play parks have already been created in Bearsden, Kirkintilloch, Milton of Campsie, Bishopbriggs and Auchinairn. It is hoped that the project will be rolled out to all 67 play areas in East Dunbartonshire.

Source: Kirkintilloch Herald, 26 June 2018

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Strong public support for public health interventions

Britons strongly support interventions on health issues, a survey suggests. The briefing, produced for the BBC, found that almost three quarters (72%) supported the ban on smoking in public spaces. The paper concludes that there is “surprisingly strong public support for these types of intervention”.

The authors, from The King’s Fund, the Health Foundation, the Institute for Fiscal Studies and the Nuffield Trust, added: “If government is serious about improving the public’s health, it must do more to tackle the wider determinants of health through a more co-ordinated approach to policy-making.”

Helen McKenna, senior policy adviser at The King’s Fund, said: “It is essential that national and local government use all the means at their disposal to improve the public’s health.
This should include being bolder in using tax and regulation where this can be effective. Although politicians may balk at the idea of the ‘nanny state’, our research suggests these types of intervention may enjoy stronger public support than they often assume.”

See also:
The Kings Fund, The public and the NHS
BBC, Tax and regulate more to improve health
Belfast Telegraph, Strong public support for sugar tax and other “nanny state” interventions – poll

Source: Times Series, 27 June 2018

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International

Germany: Do smoking bans lead to more or less smoking in the home?

In the first systematic review to focus on children’s SHS exposure at home before and after the introduction of smoke-free legislations, Sarah Nanning and colleagues at the University of Bremen, Germany, have looked at 15 studies which were published between 2007 and 2016.

The studies all included proportions of children (most aged between 5 and 15 years) exposed to SHS at home before and after the introduction of smoke-free legislation. Sample sizes ranged from 118 to 68,000 participants.

The findings indicate that children’s SHS exposure at home did not increase after the introduction of public smoking bans. The comprehensive laws (those that require worksites, restaurants, and bars to be smoke-free) and mixed smoke-free laws (where there are regional differences in the type or extent of public smoking bans within a country or with an exceptional rule for certain types of hospitality venues such as small bars) all yielded reductions of SHS exposure at home.

See also: BMC Public Health, Impact of public smoking bans on children’s exposure to tobacco smoke at home: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Source: BMC, 26 June 2018

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US: NYC public health department targets Chinese men

Nearly a quarter of Asian men smoke cigarettes, and lung cancer among Chinese men in New York City has increased by 70% over the past 15 years, according to the city’s health department.

Targeting Chinese men in particular, the department launched a public service campaign earlier this month encouraging them to quit the habit. The city has started running public service ads in Cantonese and Mandarin on Chinese-language television and in newspapers.
Chinese smokers can get free quit-smoking medication and confidential counselling from the Asian Smokers’ Quitline — a nationwide service funded by the Centres for Disease Control and Prevention.

“We have made considerable progress in driving down the rates of smoking among adults, but Chinese men still have disproportionately high rates of smoking,” said Dr. Mary T. Bassett, the city’s health commissioner. “We hope this campaign motivates Chinese men to quit smoking — it is the most important thing they can do to improve their health.”

Source: China Daily, 27 June 2018

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Mexico: Children still toil in tobacco fields as reforms fail to fix poverty

A series of exposés in the 1990s in Mexico revealed widespread use of child labour and banned agrochemicals, and detailed abysmal living and work conditions in Nayarit’s tobacco fields. Industry and government have since made steps to tackle child labour in Mexico’s tobacco fields, but low incomes for working families slows this progress.

In an effort to eradicate Mexico’s child labour, the Prospera scheme, launched in 1997, offers small cash incentives to impoverished parents to keep children in school and attend health checks and workshops on nutrition, hygiene and family planning. The government paid out $500m to 6.1 million families in 2016, but audits suggest the impact on child labour has been modest. No matter how hard some families try to get away from these plantations, poverty drags them back.

Jennie Gamlin of University College London, who investigates structural violence and health inequalities, said: “Tobacco workers are the poorest of the poor forced to work and live in poor conditions which expose them to preventable harms that reproduce inequalities. Parents know that it is harmful and wrong according to law for children to work in tobacco, but they’re poor, need the money and don’t see another option. Even when the kids aren’t working, they are playing and sleeping within the tobacco.”

Source: The Guardian, 27 June 2018

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Opinion: How we can fight child labour in the tobacco industry

Many of the world’s most popular brands of cigarettes may contain tobacco produced by vulnerable child workers. The world’s largest multinational tobacco product manufacturers, including the UK giants British American Tobacco (Lucky Strike, Camel, and Dunhill) and Imperial Brands (Davidoff and Gauloises Blondes), say that they are doing everything they can to end exploitative child labour, stop abuses in their supply chains and have policies to safeguard workers.

Human Rights Watch has been in regular contact with many tobacco companies since we started this work. Several companies have adopted new policies or strengthened existing polices to prohibit suppliers from allowing children to do dangerous tasks on farms. But no company prohibits those under 18 from all work involving direct contact with tobacco in any form – the policy that would offer the greatest protection, in line with international standards.

Most companies maintain that their policies are carried out throughout global supply chains, but we believe many do not report transparently about their monitoring and what they find. Without this information, we have to take their word for it that they’re doing enough to address rights abuses in their supply chains. Companies should provide credible, transparent information on human rights problems and steps they take to fix them.

Source: Margaret Wurth and Jane Buchanan of Human Rights Watch in The Guardian, 27 June 2018

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Opinion: Stop rising tobacco use in Africa and the Middle East

As tobacco use has steadily declined in most of the world, two large regions are bucking the trend. In the Middle East and Africa, 180 million men are predicted to be smoking by 2025 — twice as many as in 2000. To reverse this, governments need to more firmly confront the tobacco industry’s efforts to recruit the next generation of smokers.

Few Middle Eastern and African countries have fully imposed and enforced a comprehensive suite of tobacco control measures, such as raising tobacco taxes; requiring large graphic health warnings on cigarette packs; prohibiting smoking in restaurants and other public spaces; and banning tobacco advertising.

Tobacco use is the single greatest preventable cause of death. Public health specialists in developed countries have spent decades learning how to fight back — and have saved lives by the millions. Countries in the Middle East and Africa need to follow suit.

Source: Bloomberg, 26 June 2018

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ASH Daily News for 18 June 2018

UK

  • Devon: Men jailed after international tobacco smuggling operation used fridges and vacuum cleaners to evade £12m in tax
  • Scotland: Experts dismiss pub ‘smoking room’ idea
  • Scotland: Smokers offered £160 incentive to quit

International

  • Ireland: Smokers held responsible for most littering
  • Australia: Majority of Australians want e-cigarettes to be legalised – as thousands of former smokers are forced to illegally import nicotine

UK

Devon: Men jailed after international tobacco smuggling operation used fridges and vacuum cleaners to evade £12m in tax

Two men from Devon have been jailed for their role in a gang which smuggled illegal tobacco hidden inside fridges, microwaves and vacuum cleaners to evade £12 million in tax.

Ivybridge man, Kyle Langdon, 31, was jailed for two years and Andrew Carver-Trotter, 35, was sentenced to one year in March. The gang were sentenced to a total of 21 years and five months with the last member of the 11-strong operation to be sentenced at Manchester Crown Court yesterday, with a three-year jail term.

Investigators observed the smuggling ring at work in a large warehouse where hollow white goods were being used to smuggle tobacco into the UK.

After being emptied in the UK, the carcasses were returned to the warehouse in Luxembourg to be re-filled with more illicit tobacco destined for the UK.

Source: Devon Live, 15 Jun 2018

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Scotland: Experts dismiss pub ‘smoking room’ idea

A poll of more than 1,000 Scots, by Forest, a pro-smoking lobby group, has found that 57% of respondents thought bars and private clubs should be allowed to provide specially ventilated smoking rooms.

The poll findings were released in advance of the Scottish government publishing its Tobacco Control Action Plan, restating the aim of a tobacco-free country by 2034.

Sheila Duffy, chief executive of charity Action on Smoking and Health (ASH) Scotland, dismissed claims made by Forest stating “Tobacco companies and their allies have long argued in favour of expensive solutions that don’t work, while trying to derail cheap and effective ones that do. Ventilation cannot and does not protect workers from being exposed for hours to breathing a toxic substance that is harmful to health and easily prevented”.

She added: “Two thirds of Scotland’s smokers want to quit. Hardly anyone is ambitious for the children in their families and neighbourhood to take up smoking. We need to support people and communities looking to improve their health, wellbeing and finances by relegating cigarettes to the past.”

Source: The Sunday Times, 17 June 2018

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Scotland: Smokers offered £160 incentive to quit

Smokers across Scotland are being given shopping vouchers in a publicly funded attempt to help them ditch the habit. In Lanarkshire, about half of smokers living in the poorest parts of the area ditched cigarettes after being offered a financial incentive for 12 weeks.

From next month, a new initiative in Greater Glasgow and Clyde will see pregnant smokers given up to £160 to ditch cigarettes, after a successful pilot scheme.

Medical experts have welcomed the schemes as a “cost effective” way to improve the health of patients. But opposition politicians warn many taxpayers will be “sceptical” about this approach, despite the early results being positive.

Source: The Scotsman, 17 June 2018

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International

Ireland: Smokers held responsible for most littering

19% of Irish people smoke but their litter is responsible for more than half of that found on the country’s streets.

Cigarette butts accounted for 52.5% of the rubbish left on streets last year, but when boxes, wrappers, matches, matchboxes and lighters were added, smoking paraphernalia accounted for 56%, local authorities said.

Denis Naughten, the environment minister, has implored smokers to clean up after themselves, stating “Smokers in particular can bring about a significant improvement in the litter situation through relatively minor behavioural changes. Everyone must accept that, ultimately, it is their own actions that will ensure whether or not we live in a litter-free environment.”

Source: The Times, 18 June 2018

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Australia: Majority of Australians want e-cigarettes to be legalised – as thousands of former smokers are forced to illegally import nicotine

Most Australians want the ban on electronic cigarettes lifted, according to an Australian Retailers Association survey.

Conducted by the Crosby Textor Group, the poll shows 61% of 1200 adults backed a move towards legalising e-cigarettes.

Almost half of those surveyed agreed that vaporisers, used by 4.4% of smokers at the time of the 2016 Australian National Drug Strategy Household Survey, were a safer alternative than traditional tobacco cigarettes.

“More and more Australians are buying personal vaporisers with nicotine online from overseas, simply because they can’t buy them locally. It is clear that smokers are not prepared to wait around for the government to act and improve their health” said ARA executive director Russell Zimmerman.

Source: Mail Online, 18 June 2018

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ASH response to NICE consultation on ‘Tobacco Suite: prevention, cessation and harm reduction’

In June 2018 ASH submitted a response to the National Institute of Health and Care Excellence draft scope consultation reviewing the guidelines on tobacco: prevention, cessation and harm reduction.

You can read the response here:

NICE draft scope consultation – Tobacco suite: prevention, cessation and harm reduction

Big Tobacco is desperate to prevent ‘plain packaging’ spreading around the world

Typical cigarette packages before and after plain packaging was introduced

 

Coming up to a year after standardised ‘plain packaging’ was fully implemented in the UK on 20 May 2017, the Tobacco Manufacturers’ Association (TMA) [1] and now Japan Tobacco International (JTI) [2] have claimed that it’s a failure.

Why is Big Tobacco bothering, when it’s clear the UK is tough on tobacco, won its case in the courts and is not going to reverse the legislation? The reason is obvious, this is a last ditch and desperate attempt to delay and discourage the many other governments coming down the same track. Three countries have fully implemented plain packs to date (Australia, France and the United Kingdom), by the end of this year it will be six, with seven more having passed legislation and more following on behind. The dominoes are falling, markets around the world are going dark, and Big Tobacco is running scared. The WTO decision on the legality of plain packs is expected shortly, and the outcome, a defeat for the tobacco industry, has already been leaked [3].

JTI claim that plain packs aren’t supported by the public, citing a survey commissioned from Kantar TNS which it says is the ‘largest public opinion poll of its kind since plain packaging was introduced’. This is incorrect. The ASH smokefree GB survey undertaken earlier this year had a sample size of 12,767, which is five times bigger than the 2,464 in the JTI Kantar survey. Findings from the ASH survey confirm the levels of support found in previous annual smokefree GB surveys, with just under three fifths of the public supporting standardised plain packaging (58%) while only around one in ten oppose (11%). The public support plain packs, to suggest otherwise is ludicrous.

When it comes to the evidence that the policy has been ineffective, the report JTI commissioned from Europe Economics ignores the fact that it was always known that plain standardised packaging would have the biggest impact on discouraging young people from taking up smoking rather than in helping addicted adult smokers quit. This is a much smaller group than existing adult smokers, so any such effect will be small, particularly in the early years. In the first year or two of implementation most young people at the age of initiation will have been exposed throughout their life to the colourfully branded packaging as it was prior to the introduction of standardised plain packs. As with the advertising ban, it is in future years when young people grow up never having seen such packaging that we expect it to have greatest impact. This effect will be cumulative as young people grow up into adulthood in cohorts with lower smoking rates, and older smokers die off. The Europe Economics report only includes data up to January 2018 so it simply cannot capture any of this.

Furthermore, the ability of standardised packaging to produce immediate effects during the year that the legislation was phased in (i.e. not fully implemented) is predicated on the assumption that the policy was smoothly and quickly brought into effect by all parties. Evidence from the Institute for Social Marketing (University of Stirling), already shows that before, during, and after the implementation of standardised tobacco and the TPD, tobacco companies engaged in activities which may have disrupted and confounded the impact of the legislation on smoking attitudes and behaviour [4]. This included introducing limited-edition fully-branded packs and re-usable tins, changed brand or variant names (e.g. including the addition of a colour descriptor, with colour often used by consumers as an indicator of product strength or harm), and continued innovation of their products (e.g. new filter designs). In essence, they used the implementation period to continue to create interest in their products.

In addition, the UK Government allowed tobacco companies and retailers twelve months, from May 2016 to May 2017, to introduce standardised packaging, which is longer than the two other countries (2 months in Australia, 9 months in France) that have introduced this measure. The report claims that ‘the penetration of TPD2+PP compliant products has increased gradually over the implementation period’. This is not consistent with further findings by researchers at the University of Stirling, analysing real-time data from independent and convenience (small) retailers [5], which instead shows that tobacco companies and retailers responded to the extended implementation period by continuing to sell fully-branded products for as long as they could, meaning that most of the leading brands of cigarettes and rolling tobacco in the UK were not sold in standardised packs until near the end of the twelve months. It is plausible that this staggered introduction of standardised packaging may have mitigated some of the immediate intended effects of the legislation by desensitising consumers to the new designs and graphic health warnings.

Once the legislation became mandatory for packs at point of sale, which was not until May 2017, the University of Stirling researchers found that 97% of tobacco sales volume [6] in small retailers was compliant with the TPD and standardised packaging legislation (rising to 99.5% ten weeks after full implementation). Given the aforementioned industry-led disruption during the transition period, research evaluating the impact of standardised packaging should reflect on how trends in smoking attitudes and behaviours change in the years after full implementation, not reactive conclusions based on limited time periods.

Governments need to apply the rule of thumb known as the ‘scream test’, if the industry is campaigning so hard to prevent it, clearly standardised ‘plain’ packaging does work, otherwise Big Tobacco wouldn’t care.

ASH thanks researchers from the Institute for Social Marketing, University of Stirling — part of the UK Centre for Tobacco and Alcohol Studies — for their analysis of the Europe Economics report for JTI.

The studies carried out by the University of Stirling were funded by Cancer Research UK.

References

[1] Tobacco Manufacturers’ Association, Plain packaging failing one year after full introduction, 14 May 2018

[2] Japan Tobacco International, Plain Packaging on Tobacco Backfires Within First Year in the UK, 17 May 2018

[3] Reuters, Australia wins landmark WTO tobacco packaging case — Bloomberg, 4 May 2017

[4] BMJ Tobacco Control, How tobacco companies in the UK prepared for and responded to standardised packaging of cigarettes and rolling tobacco, January 2018

[5] Nicotine and Tobacco Research, Introduction of Standardized Tobacco Packaging During a 12-Month Transition Period: Findings From Small Retailers in the United Kingdom, 12 January 2018

[6] BMJ Tobacco Control, Did independent and convenience (small) retailers comply with standardised tobacco packaging in the UK?, November 2017

PMI, Poverty and the Political Game

Don’t let smokescreens like the PMI-funded ‘Foundation for a Smoke-Free World’ [1] deceive you — Big Tobacco continues to pump its lethal smoked products into low- and middle-income countries, exacerbating poverty and racking up billions of dollars along the way.

As the company continues to undermine tobacco control policies across the globe, [2] [3] its solemn commitment to a smokefree future is more than a little disingenuous. [4]

Major advancements in tobacco control across countries like the UK, have displaced international conglomerates such as PMI to low- and middle-income populations, where 80% of the world’s smokers now live. [5]

In these countries, implementation of the WHO’s Framework Convention Tobacco Control (FCTC), a lifesaving treaty which reaffirms the right of all people to the highest standard of health, has often been low. [6] Indeed, by 2014 a survey of two thirds of Parties to the Treaty found that 51 countries had implemented no measures at the highest level. [7]

But rather than mobilising to address this discrepancy and advance its shiny new smokefree agenda, PMI has been doing all it can to undermine tobacco control, both in spirit and in practice.

PMI ignores the philosophy of tobacco control by taking advantage of existing legislative loopholes and capitalising on the lack of substantive advertising restrictions in low- and middle-income countries. Though PMI promises “advertising activities are directed only toward adult smokers,” [8] its intensive marketing ploys bombard kids in countries like Benin, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Nigeria and Uganda, with tobacco sale outlets often visible from the school gates. [9] The company also uses child-friendly flavoured cigarettes to entice young people, [10] and encourages “single stick” sales by providing retailers with free promotional materials. [11]

And by attempting to subvert further implementation of the FCTC, the company also undermines the role out of tobacco control measures. Its army of corporate lobbyists are encouraged to “play the political game” [12] and deliberately target so-called “anti-tobacco extremists” at FCTC conferences (where delegates set the guidelines) and apply pressure at the country level (where delegates are selected and the treaty is transposed into law). [13]

One popular method has been to water down the health minister delegates with trade, finance and agriculture representatives, since these people are more likely to be supportive of PMI’s deadly cause — a strategy that somewhat contradicts its smokefree advocacy. [14]

It is unsurprising that 80% of the world’s tobacco-related deaths are anticipated to occur in low- and middle-income countries by 2030. [15] And in addition to the personal tragedy of life lost, this is leaving less money available for food, schooling and doctors’ fees, since spending on tobacco products can add up to over 10% of total household earnings, and premature death causes a significant loss of income. [16]

Meanwhile, even though undernourishment remains a big problem in many tobacco-producing countries, 4.3 million hectares of arable land is currently gobbled up by tobacco cultivation, which could instead be used to feed hungry people. [17] Growing tobacco also pollutes water supplies with toxic pesticides and fertilizers, and generates over 2 million tonnes of solid waste each year. [18] In fact, cigarette butts account for 30–40% of all rubbish picked up in coastal and urban clean-ups. [19]

And the worst part is that this social, economic and environmental burden is falling upon those countries least equipped to deal with the consequences.

PMI’s website reads “Society expects us to act responsibly. And we are doing just that by designing a smoke-free future.” [20] But evidently for PMI that responsibility and that future are not intended for low- and middle-income countries.

With PMI’s AGM set for this week, ASH urges the company to ditch its blatant double standards.

 

by Anna Hazelwood

 

References

[1] Tobacco Tactics, Foundation for a Smoke-Free World, March 2018

[2] The Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, Big Tobacco: Tiny Targets, a project by the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids

[3] African Tobacco Control Alliance, Big Tobacco Tiny Targets: Tobacco Industry Targets Schools in Africa, November 2016

[4] Philip Morris International, Designing a Smoke-Free Future

[5] World Health Organisation, Tobacco Key Facts, 9 March 2018

[6] Gravely et al, Implementation of key demand-reduction measures of the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control and change in smoking prevalence in 126 countries: an association study, 2017

[7] Gravely et al, Implementation of key demand-reduction measures of the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control and change in smoking prevalence in 126 countries: an association study, 2017

[8] Philip Morris International, Underage tobacco and nicotine use

[9] African Tobacco Control Alliance, Big Tobacco Tiny Targets: Tobacco Industry Targets Schools in Africa, November 2016

[10] African Tobacco Control Alliance, Big Tobacco Tiny Targets: Tobacco Industry Targets Schools in Africa, November 2016

[11] African Tobacco Control Alliance, Sale of single sticks of cigarettes in Africa: survey report from 10 capital cities, March 2018

[12] Reuters, Inside Philip Morris’ campaign to subvert the global anti-smoking treaty, July 2017

[13] Reuters, Inside Philip Morris’ campaign to subvert the global anti-smoking treaty, July 2017

[14] Reuters, Inside Philip Morris’ campaign to subvert the global anti-smoking treaty, July 2017

[15] World Health Organisation, The Global Tobacco Crisis, 2008

[16] World Health Organisation, Tobacco is a deadly threat to global development, May 2017

[17] World Health Organisation, Tobacco and its environmental impact, 2017

[18] World Health Organisation, Tobacco is a deadly threat to global development, May 2017

[19] World Health Organisation, Tobacco is a deadly threat to global development, May 2017

[20] Philip Morris International, Designing a Smoke-Free Future

All links active 9 May 2018

Exposing the global harm caused by the tobacco industry

Today sees the start of a co-ordinated week of action by ASH and our partners to highlight the global harm caused by the tobacco industry.

This action is timed to coincide with annual general meetings of two of the largest transnational tobacco companies — British American Tobacco (BAT) and Philip Morris International (PMI).

Tobacco kills around 6 million people every year [1] — a figure greater than the number of people living in Denmark [2].

Smoking is the largest preventable cause of death and disease across the world.

Despite the widespread harm caused by the tobacco industry, the businesses involved continue to harvest enormous profits. BAT alone made a profit of £5.2 billion in 2016 [3] from their global market share of about 11%. [4]

The harm from the tobacco industry extends beyond that caused to individuals who smoke or are exposed to second-hand smoke. Tobacco farming takes valuable land that could be used to produce food and other more useful resources, and increases poverty in low income countries.

Child labour is used extensively in tobacco farming and production, harming efforts to improve educational outcomes [1], while the adult labour involved could be put to more productive and beneficial work. Many workers involved in harvesting tobacco, especially children, fall ill with a condition called green tobacco sickness. [1]

Hundreds of millions of trees are felled every year to make way for tobacco crops [5], accelerating deforestation and contributing negatively to climate change.

Throughout the next eight days we will be exposing the global harm caused by the tobacco industries — to individuals, families, societies, the global economy and our environment. Please join us in sharing these messages and encourage governments to #ActOnTobacco.

Here are some ways in which you can get involved in the campaign.

Notes
All hyperlinks accessed on 20 April 2017
[1] http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs339/en/
[2] http://denmark.dk/en/quick-facts/facts/
[3]http://www.bat.com/group/sites/uk__9d9kcy.nsf/vwPagesWebLive/DO9DCL3B/$FILE/medMDAKPK62.pdf?openelement page 2
[4] https://www.statista.com/statistics/279873/global-cigarette-market-share-by-group/
[5] Leppan W, Lecours N, Buckles D. (Editors). Tobacco control and tobacco farming: Separating myth from reality. International Development Research Center. New York: Anthem Press; 2014

Economics of Tobacco

The costs of smoking to the economy include the expense of treating diseases caused by smoking as well as reduced productivity and environmental costs.  March 2017.

 

The Economics of Tobacco

HMRC Consultation on Tobacco Illicit Trade Protocol – ASH response

ASH response to HMRC Consultation on Tobacco Illicit Trade Protocol – licensing of equipment and the supply chain.

ASH-response-HMRC-licensing-consultation.pdf

Waterpipes (shisha)

This fact sheet focuses primarily on waterpipe use and regulation in the UK.   Oct 2015.

28. Waterpipes (shisha)

Tobacco and the Environment

From growing the tobacco plant to the disposal of butts and packaging, the whole life cycle of a cigarette takes a heavy toll on the environment.  Sept 2015.

22. Tobacco and the Environment
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