Action on Smoking and Health

Tag Archives: Smoking in pregnancy


ASH Daily News for 20 July 2018

UK

  • South Yorkshire: Rother Valley MP calls for Government to keep up the push to cut smoking deaths
  • NHS Response: Vaping and using nicotine patches in pregnancy
  • West Midlands: Thousands of illegal tobacco products seized in Dudley
  • Social Smoking: Just how bad is it for you?

International

Australia: Four in five lung cancers preventable through healthy lifestyle

Parliamentary Activity

  • Parliamentary debate to review the tobacco control plan

Link of the Week

  • New Secretary of State for Health and Social Care Speech

UK

South Yorkshire: Rother Valley MP calls for Government to keep up the push to cut smoking deaths

Following yesterday’s parliamentary debate to review the Tobacco Control Plan, Sir Kevin Barron, MP for Rother Valley, has written an article calling on the government to increase funding for smoking cessation services to ensure that the targets set out in the plan are met.

In the article he criticises the misrepresentation of evidence surrounding e-cigarettes in the media: “It is very unfortunate that sensationalist media reports are creating an air of uncertainty around e-cigarettes and deterring many smokers from making the switch. It would be a tragedy if thousands of smokers who could quit with the help of an e-cigarette are being put off due to false fears about their safety.”

Public Health England has said that e-cigarettes are at least 95 per cent less harmful than cigarettes and that the main chemicals in e-cigarettes have not been associated with any serious risk.

Source: Retford Guardian, 20 July 2018

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NHS Response: Vaping and using nicotine patches in pregnancy

The NHS has responded to a recent study from the US which linked vaping and the use of nicotine patches in pregnancy to cot death (Sudden Infant Death Syndrome). The UK media’s reporting of the study was sensationalised, playing down the fact that the research was on rats, and the findings related to rats with depleted serotonin.

The researchers found that exposure to nicotine during pregnancy limited the ability of serotonin-deficient rats to recover back to normal breathing and heart rates following a period of oxygen deprivation.

The NHS recommends that smokers planning a pregnancy should use nicotine replacement therapies, such as patches, to help them quit smoking before trying for a baby.

Source: NHS Choices, 20 July 2018

Editorial Note: Francine Bates, Chief Executive of The Lullaby Trust and co-chair of the Smoking in Pregnancy Challenge Group (SPCG), put out this statement: “We don’t think parents should worry about the findings of this study as it was conducted on laboratory rats, not human babies. Research that has been conducted on women who used NRT patches in pregnancy showed that there was no increase in infant mortality up to the age of two years old, compared to women who used a placebo. While there is currently no research linking electronic (or ‘e’) cigarettes to an increased risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), using an e-cigarette appears to be much safer than continuing to smoke during pregnancy and once your baby is born. Tobacco cigarettes contain toxins that cause harm to an unborn baby by starving them of oxygen, but these toxins are not present in e-cigarettes or NRT.”

“Smoking tobacco cigarettes before or after pregnancy significantly increases the chance of SIDS. That’s why we strongly encourage any pregnant women or new parents who smoke to keep their baby smoke-free. Whilst it’s always best for pregnant women to quit using nicotine completely, those who find it hard to do so should not stop using NRT or e-cigarettes on the basis of this research. We would advise anyone who is concerned about smoking to contact their midwife or GP who can offer advice and refer them to stop smoking services.”

SPCG Guide: Use of electronic cigarettes in pregnancy

Study: https://physoc.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1113/JP275885

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West Midlands: Thousands of illegal tobacco products seized in Dudley

Over 150,000 illegal cigarettes and 1,000kg of tobacco were seized by Dudley Council last year as part of their efforts to crack down on illegal tobacco.

The operation has resulted in two prosecutions with several more pending, and several shops have had their alcohol licences suspended or revoked for dealing with illegal tobacco products.

Councillor Ruth Buttery, Dudley’s cabinet member for health and wellbeing, said: “Whilst all tobacco is harmful, the illegal tobacco market, and in particular the availability of cheap cigarettes, undermines government health policies aimed at reducing the cost to the NHS of treating diseases caused by smoking.”

Source: Stourbridge News, 19 July 2018

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Social Smoking: Just how bad is it for you?

Although many people who smoke socially might not describe themselves as a smoker, they are not exempt from many of the health issues associated with smoking. Social smokers are still susceptible to lung infections, smoking-related cancers, shorter life expectancy and accelerated signs of ageing.

Even if social smokers aren’t addicted to nicotine they can still be addicted to the psychoactive experience of smoking in social situations. Professor Robert West, an expert on smoking from the University College London, describes the desire to smoke occasionally as a “situational craving” – explaining why you may only feel like a cigarette when you drink. “One way addiction works is by forming an association between situations where a person would typically smoke, which then creates the impulse to smoke when they find themselves in that situation again,” he says.

Even light smoking can cause DNA mutations which increase the likelihood of developing cancer. Dr Richard Russell, Consultant Respiratory Physician and medical advisor to the British Lung Foundation, said: “It’s the toxic chemicals you are inhaling. Even occasional smoking puts your health at risk – the only safe level of smoking is nothing at all.”

Source: Sheerluxe, 19 July 2018

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International

Australia: Four in five lung cancers preventable through healthy lifestyle

Researchers at the University of New South Wales (UNSW) in Sydney have found evidence to suggest that the majority of lung cancers are related to smoking.

Using data from the Centre for Big Data Research in Health, the researchers showed that lung cancer risk remained elevated for 40 years after people stopped smoking, with the risk approximately halving every 10 years.

Dr Maarit Laaksonen, Senior Research Fellow at UNSW, said: “More than three out of four lung cancers are caused by ever smoking. Current smoking is responsible for more than half of lung cancers and past smoking for nearly a quarter. Our findings strongly support the dual importance of preventing the uptake of smoking and assisting quitting.”

Source: MedicalXpress, 19 July 2018

Centre for Big Data Research in Health: Population-level relevance of risk factors for cancer

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Parliamentary Activity

Parliamentary debate to review the tobacco control plan

The transcript of yesterday’s Government Debate on the Tobacco Control Plan can be found here.

Source: Hansard, 19 July 2018

Link of the Week

New Secretary of State for Health and Social Care Speech

Today, Matt Hancock, the new Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, delivered his debut speech setting out his priorities for the health and social care system.

He talks extensively about the importance of preventative measures to ease the pressures on staff, improve patient outcomes and keep people out of hospital: “prevention… is mission critical to making the health and social care system sustainable.”

Source: gov.uk, 20 July 2018

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ASH Daily News for 6 July 2018

UK

  • Londis recommends stores replace tobacco gantries
  • Blog: Duncan Selbie, Public Health Matters

International

  • Increasing number of holiday destinations completely banning vaping
  • Swedish study: Mother’s health linked to foetus’s future fertility

Parliamentary Activity

  • Oral evidence given by Simon Stevens at the Health Select Committee
  • Parliamentary business: Lord Faulkner’s speech in the NHS debate

Link of the week

  • Launch of the Smoking in Pregnancy Challenge Group report: Review of the Challenge 2018

UK

Londis recommends stores replace tobacco gantries

Londis has recommended to its stores to replace visible tobacco gantries with craft alcohol and vaping products in its new and refitted stores. It has said that this move could significantly increase sales.

The symbol group’s brand director Martin Swadling said the strategy would help future-proof the company’s estate. “Tobacco is still important, but it’s declining and selling it from a big cupboard isn’t using space very well,” he said.

Raj Aggarwal, of Spar Wigston in Leicester, said weekly vape sales increased from £100 to £400 after he replaced his gantry with e-liquids. He said: “Traditional gantries aren’t relevant anymore because customers immediately ask for certain brands or the cheapest pack. Vaping is more profitable. We make between 25% to 40% margins.”

A retailer, who asked not to be named, said weekly alcohol sales grew by £1,600 when she replaced her gantry with craft gin this year. “There’s no future in tobacco gantries. Ours was replaced with 22 gin products and we added lights to make it more attractive. Alcohol sales rose immediately,” she said.

Source: Better Retailing, 3 July 2018

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Blog: Duncan Selbie, Public Health Matters

On Tuesday new PHE and ONS smoking prevalence figures for England showed that rates have dipped below 15% for the first time representing a near quarter reduction over the past five years. Notwithstanding, smoking remains the nation’s biggest killer and there is still much to do to achieve the first-ever smokefree generation in England.

Source: Public Health England, 6 July 2018

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International

Increasing number of holiday destinations completely banning vaping

Holidaymakers are being urged to check vaping laws before their summer getaway after five more destinations banned e-cigarettes with punishment ranging from fines to prison. India, the Philippines, Lebanon, Cambodia and Vietnam have all recently clamped down on the devices.
In some countries the punishment can be particularly strict. In Thailand, tourists face a 10-year jail sentence for bringing e-cigarettes or e-liquid refills into the country.

Source: Daily Mail Online, 6 July 2018

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Swedish study: Mother’s health linked to foetus’s future fertility

Women who are overweight or who smoke during pregnancy are more likely to have daughters who develop polycystic ovary syndrome, a nationwide Swedish study has found.

Polycystic ovary syndrome affects about one in 10 women and is the most common cause of female infertility. It is typically characterised by ovarian cysts, irregular menstrual cycles and high testosterone levels. The exact causes are unknown, but mounting evidence suggests that the syndrome can be triggered by environmental factors in the uterus.

Source: New Scientist, 3 July 2018 (Print only)

See also: BJOG, An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Prenatal exposures and birth indices, and subsequent risk of polycystic ovary syndrome: a national registry‐based cohort study

Parliamentary Activity

Oral evidence given by Simon Stevens at the Health Select Committee

Simon Stevens’ oral evidence to the Health & Social Care Select Committee on Monday 2 July 2018 covered the issue of smoking cessation – see below for extracts.

“It is pretty clear that we will have to keep pushing harder on smoking, and smoking cessation is part of that. That cannot all be done through local authority commissioned services; we are going to have to look at whether the NHS can embed smoking cessation in more of the routine contacts that we have with vulnerable groups who are still smoking. ASH and the Royal College of Physicians have put out an important set of proposals in the last 10 days, which we will take a very careful look at.”

“The point is that smoking has been going down, and we want it to go down even further. ASH talks about 5% as being the smoking level at which you could say that we are almost smoke free. As a result of the judgments that Public Health England has made, we have a big hypothesis in this country that moving on a harm minimisation basis away from smoked tobacco to e-cigs represents a good thing to do.

“That is different from the judgment that some other countries have come to, but it is the judgment that our public health experts have come to. We absolutely have to look at smoking because of its obvious impact on cardiac disease and cancer. We know that two fifths of cancers are preventable, so, to the extent that we can give ourselves headroom for continued gains there, it means that whatever funding the country wants to put into health services we can actually deploy on new therapies for conditions that could not otherwise have been prevented.”

Source: Parliament, 2 July 2018

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Parliamentary business: Lord Faulkner’s speech in the NHS debate

Lord Faulkner spoke in the debate on the 5th July in the House of Lords on the Creation of the NHS in 1948, and the case for integration of health, mental health, social and community care to equip the NHS for the next 70 years. He asked the Minister to confirm that he would ensure that NHS England takes into account the evidence and the recommendations set out in the recent RCP report on treating tobacco dependency as it develops the new Plan for the NHS.

Watch full debate here (Lord Faulkner’s speech starts 16:26:34)

Lord Shaugnessy’s response to Faulkner’s challenge

In response to Lord Faulkner’s challenge the Minister said, “Our Tobacco Plan lays out an ambition to reduce smoking among adults to 12% or less and I can confirm that the Plan does align with the RCP report recommendations.”

Watch Lord Shaugnessy’s response

Source: Parliament live TV, 5 July 2018

Parliamentary Activity

Launch of the Smoking in Pregnancy Challenge Group report: Review of the Challenge 2018

This report details how smoking in pregnancy rates have stalled in the last few years at just below 11%. The current ambition is to reduce SATOD rates to less than 6% by 2022. However on the current sluggish trajectory, by 2022 SATOD rates will be around 8.7%. The Challenge Group report makes a number of policy recommendations to address the ongoing slowdown.

Download Report

Smoking rates at a record low: but not for poorer or pregnant smokers  

3rd July 2018

Smoking rates at a record low: but not for poorer or pregnant smokers

Overall smoking rates for 2017 have just been published for England, and are at all-time low of 14.9%, down from 19.3% just five years ago [1]. This brings the estimated number of smokers in England in 2017 to 6.1 million, 1.6 million fewer than in 2011. This progress is thanks to the world-leading strategy implemented by successive Governments to support more people to quit and prevent children from taking up smoking.

However, the new figures also reveal that there is no room for complacency. Action is urgently needed to address the lack of progress in reducing smoking rates among pregnant women and the growing gap in smoking rates between rich and poor.

One in four people in routine and manual occupations smoke compared to one in ten in professional and managerial occupations. The data published today shows that this gap is widening over time, not reducing in line with the ambition set out in the Tobacco Control Plan for England published last year [2]. The Government is also failing to meet its target for reducing smoking in pregnancy, with smoking rates stuck at 11% for the last three years.

Deborah Arnott chief executive of health charity ASH said:

“ASH supports the Government’s vision, set out in the Tobacco Control Plan for England, of a smokefree generation. But smoking must become history for all of society not just for the wealthy. Cuts in public health funding and lack of treatment for smoking on the NHS mean poorer more heavily addicted smokers, including those who are pregnant, are not getting the help they need to quit.” 

The Smoking in Pregnancy Challenge Group has today published a report [3] setting out its recommendations for ensuring that the Government target is met, of reducing smoking in pregnancy to 6% or less by 2022. Key is ensuring the right support is integrated into NHS care, something all smokers would benefit from.

Commenting on the report, Francine Bates, Chief Executive, The Lullaby Trust and Co-Chair of the Smoking in Pregnancy Challenge Group said:

“This report should be a wake-up call. On the current trajectory, the Government will miss its ambition to reduce rates of smoking among pregnant women with tragic consequences. We have made real progress in the past in helping women to have smokefree pregnancies and we must be ambitious about what can be achieved in the future to protect thousands of families from entirely preventable and heartbreaking outcomes.” 

The full report and recommendations are available here. This includes a new analysis of the number of deaths of babies and other adverse health outcomes which would be avoided if government targets for the reduction in smoking in pregnancy were achieved.

Last week the Royal College of Physicians published a report calling for support to smokers to be fully embedded throughout the NHS with the potential to save thousands of lives and millions of pounds [4]. Stepping up the care provided by the NHS would help to address the the big differences in smoking rates between social groups.

ENDS

Notes and Links:

Action on Smoking and Health is a health charity working to eliminate the harm caused by tobacco use. For more information see: www.ash.org.uk/about-ash

ASH receives funding for its programme of work from Cancer Research UK and the British Heart Foundation.

ASH staff are available for interview and have an ISDN line. For more information contact ASH on 020 7404 0242 or out of hours Deborah Arnott on 07976 935 987 or Hazel Cheeseman on 07754 358 593.

References 

[1] NHS Digital https://digital.nhs.uk/news-and-events/latest-news/around-1.6-million-fewer-adult-smokers-in-england-in-six-years 

[2] Department of Health, Towards a Smokfree Generation; Tobacco Control Plan for England, 2017 https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/towards-a-smoke-free-generation-tobacco-control-plan-for-england

[3] Smoking in Pregnancy Challenge Group, A Review of the Challenge, 2018
Full report: https://ash.org.uk/information-and-resources/reports-submissions/reports/smoking-in-pregnancy-challenge-group-review-of-the-challenge-2018/  
Press release: http://smokefreeaction.org.uk/smoking-in-pregnancy-challenge-group-review-of-the-challenge-2018/

[4] Royal College of Physicians, Hiding in plain sight; treating tobacco dependency in the NHS, 2018 https://www.rcplondon.ac.uk/news/innovation-medicine-2018-providing-smoking-cessation-patients-hospitals-will-save-lives-and  

Smoking in pregnancy challenge group, Review of the Challenge 2018

The Smoking in Pregnancy Challenge Group released a report on the 4th July 2018 calling for Government action to tackle smoking in pregnancy.

The new report shines light on the progress towards the Government’s ambition to reduce the smoking in pregnancy rate to less than 6% by 2022 and warns that unless more is done this ambition is unlikely to be met.

The full report can be downloaded here (pdf).

New report finds midwives and doctors need more training to address smoking in pregnancy

18 July 2017

A new report [1] is published by Action on Smoking and Health (ASH) [2] on behalf of the Smoking in Pregnancy Challenge Group [3] and launched in Parliament today (18th July) at a joint event between the APPG on Baby Loss [4] and the APPG on Smoking and Health [5].

The report provides an analysis of the training that midwives and obstetricians receive to address smoking in pregnant women, and what further training is needed. Smoking is a major cause of stillbirth and sudden infant death, and also leads to more babies being born with health problems and with a low birth weight.

Evidence shows that short and straightforward conversations with midwives and doctors can increase the chances of a woman accessing services that will help her to quit.

However, while staff are being taught about the harms from smoking in pregnancy, training on how to communicate this to women, how to use basic equipment such as carbon monoxide monitors, and how to provide short effective advice to women is not being provided consistently around the country.

Report author Dr Misha Moore, a doctor in both Public Health and Obstetrics, who wrote the report for ASH, said: “Throughout this process, people would tell me the importance of reducing smoking in pregnancy ‘goes without saying’. But leaving things unsaid appears to be just the problem. The majority of staff are clear on the risks of smoking, but not all are quite so clear on how they could help women to stop. Simple, low cost, training delivered by every Trust in the country could go a long way to addressing this issue.”

Francine Bates, Chief Executive of the Lullaby Trust and co-chair of the Smoking in Pregnancy Challenge Group said: “Tragically smoking causes ill health and death among babies in this country every day. We know that pregnant women listen to their midwife and their obstetrician. With the right training, they could make a big difference to the number of women smoking in pregnancy.”

Will Quince MP, co-chair of the APPG on Baby Loss, said: “Undergraduates must not leave midwifery and medical schools simply with knowledge on harms from smoking. They need practical skills so their interaction with a woman who smokes actually helps her to quit. These must not only be taught but be tested too.”

Antoinette Sandbach MP, co-chair of the APPG on Baby Loss, said: “Smoking is an addiction and it can be very hard to give up without the right support. Health professionals need to be sensitive and non-judgemental in the ways they encourage women to give up smoking. Building this into training and professional development is vital.”

The report also highlights that training of maternity staff is not enough on its own. There has to be co-ordination with the local services that help women to quit smoking.

Bob Blackman MP, Chair of the APPG on Smoking and Health said: “Stop smoking support is incredibly cost effective. Every local area needs to find a way of maintaining these vital services, particularly for pregnant women.”

ENDS

Notes and Links:

Members of the Smoking in Pregnancy Challenge Group are available for interview and for more information and an ISDN line available for interviews. Please contact ASH on 020 7404 0242 or out of hours Hazel Cheeseman on 07754 358 593.

The full report is available here, and the executive summary is here.

References

[1] Smokefree Skills: a review of maternity workforce training is published by ASH on behalf of the Smoking in Pregnancy Challenge Group. For a copy of the executive summary and full report please contact ASH: 020 7404 0242

[2] Action on Smoking and Health is a health charity working to eliminate the harm caused by tobacco use. You can find more information here. ASH co-ordinates the Smoking in Pregnancy Challenge Group.

ASH receives funding for its programme of work from Cancer Research UK and the British Heart Foundation.

[3] The Smoking in Pregnancy Challenge Group was founded in 2012 in response to a challenge by the then Public Health Minister to identify means to reduce rates of smoking in pregnancy. It is a coalition of public health organisations, baby charities and medical royal colleges, co-ordinated by ASH.

[4] The All Party Parliamentary Group on Baby Loss is co-chaired by Antoinette Sandbach MP and Will Quince MP. The secretariat is provided by The Lullaby Trust. The APPG’s overall aims are to develop policy that supports families dealing with the grief and loss of a baby, and to raise awareness of what more can be done by the government, Parliament or other agencies to help those affected. You can learn more about the APPG here.

[5] The All Party Parliamentary Group on Smoking and Health is chaired by Bob Blackman MP. The secretariat is provided by ASH. The purpose of the APPG is to monitor and discuss the health and social effects of smoking; to review potential changes in existing legislation to reduce levels of smoking; to assess the latest medical techniques to assist in smoking cessation; and to act as a resource for the group’s members on all issues relating to smoking and public health. You can learn more about the APPG here.

Smoking in Pregnancy Challenge Group media release: smoking during pregnancy rates

15 June 2017

Smoking rates among pregnant women should be a wake-up call for the Government

New figures today point to a slowdown in progress to reduce rates of smoking in pregnancy. This comes on the day when national figures show that overall rates of smoking have fallen to a record low raising concerns about growing inequalities as women who smoke in pregnancy are more likely to be experiencing disadvantage.

Today’s data finds that rates of smoking among pregnant women have hardly changed over the last 12 months with only a 0.1% decline from 10.6% in 2015/16 to 10.5%today [1].  It is particularly concerning that maternal smoking at time of birth rose in quarter 4 2016/17 to 10.8% [1]. This should raise concerns for the Government given their national target was 11% in 2015. In comparison, data on adult smoking rates released today shows a record decline of 1.4% between 2015 and 2016 [2].

Good progress has been made in recent years to reduce rates of smoking in pregnant women and it is unclear why they should have stalled in the last 12 months. However, the Smoking in Pregnancy Challenge Group [3], a coalition of health charities working to reduce rates of smoking in pregnancy, is concerned that cuts to local services and the capacity of maternity staff to appropriately support and encourage women to quit, have not helped.

Francine Bates, Chief Executive of the Lullaby Trust and co-chair of the Challenge Group said:

“Clearly the job is not done. Smoking tragically remains the cause of too many babies’ deaths each year with many more born prematurely or with health conditions. We cannot afford to go backwards having made good progress. The Government must urgently publish the now long promised Tobacco Control Plan to not only address smoking in pregnancy but ensure that fewer women are smoking when they become pregnant.”

Professor Linda Bauld, University of Stirling and co-chair of the Challenge Group said:

“Progress is possible but it requires concerted Government action. Without this, there is a risk of widening inequalities as we fail to reach the women who most need help and support. We need good local services on the ground and a comprehensive national strategy with strong new targets that seek to narrow the difference in smoking rates between rich and poor.”

 The Government has repeatedly committed to publish a new Tobacco Control Plan for England. In March 2017 the Minister of State for Health Philip Dunne responding to a debate on Baby Loss reassured MPs that a new Tobacco Control Plan would be forthcoming saying: “We are looking to take considerable action to advance the cause of reducing smoking…I very much hope that we will be able to progress with the next iteration of the tobacco control plan in the next few months” [4]

Hazel Cheeseman, Director of Policy at Action on Smoking and Health which co-ordinates the Challenge Group, said:

“Over the last four years the Smoking in Pregnancy Challenge Group has published two reviews of Government action and made a number of recommendations. We have been pleased to work with Public Health England and NHS England to put some of those recommendations into practice. This work must continue and it is important that smoking continues to be a priority if the Government’s targets to reduce stillbirths are to be met.”

ENDS

Members of the Challenge Group are available for interview and for more information. Please contact ASH on 020 7404 0242 or out of hours Hazel Cheeseman on 07754 358 593.

References

[1] NHS Digital, Statistics on women’s smoking status at time of delivery, England – Quarter 4 2016/17, June 2017

Women smoking at time of delivery

2016/17 – 10.5%

2015/16 – 10.6%

2014/15 – 11.4%

2013/14 – 12.0%

2012/13 – 12.7%

[2] ONS, Statistics on Smoking, England 2017, June 2017

[3] Smoking in Pregnancy Challenge Group is a coalition of health charities:

  • Royal College of Midwives
  • Royal College of Obstetricians & Gynaecologists
  • Royal College of General Practitioners
  • Royal College of Nursing
  • Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health
  • The Lullaby Trust
  • UK Centre for Tobacco Control Studies
  • Action on Smoking and Health
  • Tommy’s
  • Bliss
  • Faculty of Public Health
  • National Centre for Smoking Cessation & Training
  • Community Practitioners and Health Visitors Association
  • Sands – Stillbirth and neonatal death charity
  • Institute of Health Visiting
  • Royal Society for Public Health
  • Fresh
  • Tobacco Control Collaborating Centre

http://www.smokefreeaction.org.uk/SIP/index.html

[4] Backbench Business Debate Baby Loss (public health guidance) 21st March 2016 https://hansard.parliament.uk/commons/2017-03-21/debates/03E7C848-6DD5-4110-9D22-026A8500AD3C/BabyLoss(PublicHealthGuidelines)

Notes

Action on Smoking and Health is a health charity working to eliminate the harm caused by tobacco use. For more information see: www.ash.org.uk/about-ash

ASH receives funding for its programme of work from Cancer Research UK and the British Heart Foundation.

ASH staff are available for interview and for more information and an ISDN line available for interviews. Please contact ASH on 020 7404 0242 or out of hours Deborah Arnott on 07976 935 987 or Hazel Cheeseman on 07754 358 593.

Smoking and Reproduction

Cigarette smoking can affect fertility in both women and men, sexual function in men, pregnant women’s health, the health of an unborn child, and the health of young children.  Dec. 2016.

07. Smoking and Reproduction
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