ASH Daily News for 3 September 2019



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UK

  • Video: ‘It’s never too late to stop smoking’

International

  • Australia: Cigarettes to cost AUD$35 (£19.63) a pack after 12.5% tax increase
  • USA: The test that could save the life of a long-time smoker you know

UK

Video: ‘It’s never too late to stop smoking’

A new campaign has been launched across East Sussex to highlight the impact of tobacco on smokers and their families. The ‘Be There Tomorrow’ campaign urges smokers to quit using free local services available. An estimated 62,000 East Sussex residents smoke and, in the coming year, more than 1,000 adults in the county are predicted to die of smoking-related diseases.

Source: ITV News, 2 September 2019

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International

Australia: Cigarettes to cost AUD$35 (£19.63) a pack after 12.5% tax increase

The price of Australian cigarettes rose by 12.5% on Sunday – the latest in a series of tobacco excise rises that have taken the average packet to a world record of A$35 (£19.63).

Australia’s federal Government has now increased tobacco excise for seven consecutive years, with an average pack expected to reach A$40 (£22.44) a pack by 2020. Abby Smith, director of Quit Tasmania, said that cigarettes will cost a pack-a-day smoker over A$10,000 (£5,607) per year.

Dr Colin Mendelsohn, professor at the University of New South Wales, said: ‘Until this price rise, Australia’s already got the highest cigarette prices in the world. A pack of 20 Marlboro has been around $30 […] New Zealand’s about $27 and everyone else is way behind.’

Source: Mail Online, 3 September 2019

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USA: The test that could save the life of a long-time smoker you know

A test called CT lung cancer screening could save the lives of tens of thousands of American smokers and former smokers every year, but only only 4% of those eligible are getting it. While U.S. smoking rates have fallen to a historic low, 38 million Americans still smoke. Men who currently smoke have a risk of lung cancer about 23 times that of nonsmokers, while the risk for women is about 13 times higher.

Unlike standard X-ray imaging, which sends X-rays through the patient in only one direction, CT transmits and detects X-rays in many different directions, dramatically improving imaging of the body’s interior. In recent years, low-dose CT has begun to be used to screen for lung cancer. Regular chest X-rays detect lung cancer tumours only when they measure centimetres in diameter – the size of a penny or bigger – but CT can find them much earlier, when they are only millimetres wide. These newer CT scans also use a lower dosage of X-rays, lowering other potential health risks.

Source: The Conversation, 2 September 2019

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