ASH Daily News for 27 November 2019



print
UK

  • De La Rue warns its future is in ‘significant doubt’

International

  • Australia: Alcohol and tobacco policies estimated to have saved 36,000 lives
  • US: Graphic photos likely to be coming to cigarette packs
  • US: DC government sues e-cigarette maker Juul over underage use

UK
De La Rue warns its future is in ‘significant doubt’

De La Rue, the company that prints UK bank notes and passports, as well as being responsible for the track and trace system for all tobacco products sold in the UK, has warned there is “significant doubt” about its future unless a turnaround plan revives its fortunes. It is suspending its dividend to help tackle mounting debts as it reported a first-half loss following a raft of problems.

De La Rue said it was now focused on delivering a turnaround plan under its new chief executive, Clive Vacher, who was appointed last month. It said it expected to fare better in the second half of 2019/2020, when it expects more favourable currency volumes and benefits from cost cuts.

Source: The Guardian, 26 November 2019

Read Article

International

Australia: Alcohol and tobacco policies estimated to have saved 36,000 lives

Australian laws curbing smoking and drinking have helped to save around 36,000 lives and reduced total cancer deaths by 5%, according to a new study commissioned by the La Trobe Centre for Alcohol Policy Research. The study looked at the introduction of new policies – such as banning cigarette adverts on TV and radio – and the variations in deaths from head, neck, lung or liver cancer, among others.

“Our research provides new evidence that key public health policies on alcohol and tobacco introduced in Australia from the 1960s to 2013 are related to reductions in mortality rates for various cancers,” lead researcher Dr Jason Jiang said. “We hope these findings will also help Australians make more informed decisions on their alcohol and tobacco consumption.”

The research analysed 100 years of data collected by the Australian Bureau of Statistics, Cancer Council Victoria, the WHO Cancer Mortality Database and the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare. It is the first study to look at how public health policies on alcohol and tobacco – implemented in Australia from the 1960s – have affected cancer deaths rates.

“It’s clear from our findings that the full effect of more recent policies, such as plain cigarette packaging and alcohol content labelling of beverages, may not be known for decades,” Dr Jiang said. “It’s important to evaluate what works, what doesn’t, and where to invest future funding.”

Source: Mail On Sunday, 27 November 2019

See also:
BMC Medicine. Can public health policies on alcohol and tobacco reduce a cancer epidemic? Australia’s experience. November 2019

Read Article

US: Graphic photos likely to be coming to cigarette packs

Graphic health warnings may soon be displayed on cigarette packs in the US. The last day for public comment on proposed US Food and Drug Association (FDA) regulations is today (27th November).

“With these new proposed cigarette health warnings, we have an enormous public health opportunity to increase the public’s understanding of the full scope of serious negative health consequences of cigarette smoking,” said FDA Commissioner Ned Sharpless, MD, in August. “Given that tobacco use is still the leading cause of preventable disease and death in the US., there’s a lot at stake to ensure the public understands these risks.”

Research cited by the FDA has shown these kinds of photos deter smoking more effectively than the text warnings the FDA has required for decades. Similar images appear on cigarettes in Europe and in other countries, but US tobacco giant RJ Reynolds in 2012 led a class action lawsuit to quell earlier efforts to require graphic photos. That lawsuit was overruled earlier this year when a judge issued an order requiring the FDA to publish these proposed regulations by August 2019, with warnings required to appear on packs 15 months after final regulations are issued.

Source: MedicineNet Health News, 26 November 2019

Read Article

US: DC government sues e-cigarette maker Juul over underage use

The District of Columbia is joining several states in suing e-cigarette maker Juul Labs, saying the company’s online advertisements and promotions illegally targeted underage people. Washington DC Attorney General Karl Racine announced the lawsuit on Tuesday 26th November, alleging that Juul’s marketing contributed to the increase in underage vaping in the district. The move follows similar lawsuits filed last week by California and New York.

Source: Medical XPress, 26 November 2019

Read Article

ASH Daily News is a digest of published news on smoking-related topics. ASH is not responsible for the content of external websites. ASH does not necessarily endorse the material contained in this bulletin.