Health Inequalities Resource Pack



In the UK, smoking rates have declined year-on-year in response to a comprehensive  evidenced-based tobacco control strategy.  However, while rates have broadly declined across society, they remain disproportionately high in some communities and inequalities in smoking rates have grown since the turn of the century. 

Regardless of background, the majority of adult smokers want to stop. Most begin smoking in childhood, as a result of environmental determinants, and only realise how hard it is to quit after becoming addicted.  More than two thirds of those who try smoking go on to become regular smokers. Once addicted quitting is tough, with a recent estimate suggesting that on average people who smoke will try 30 times before succeeding. The more those around you smoke, the more likely you are to start smoking and the more difficult it is to quit, perpetuating these cycles, and transmitting inequalities across generations.

Smoking is responsible for at least half the difference in life expectancy between the richest and poorest in society. However, higher rates of smoking and greater levels of addiction are not only found among those in lower socio-economic groups, but also among other sections of the population, many of whom already experience health and wider socially determined inequalities. Higher rates of smoking both drive and exacerbate these inequalities, leading to poorer health outcomes and even locking people into poverty.

Going smokefree, particularly for those who are most addicted, is easier with support and through targeted action. Only by eliminating the inequalities in smoking rates and achieving a smokefree society for everyone can disparities in life expectancy and quality of life be significantly reduced. Local authorities can and do play a central role in this and should ensure that comprehensive strategies are in place to deliver equality in health.

ASH with the support of the Faculty of Public Health, the Association of Directors of Public Health, Public Health England and Fresh has produced this set of materials to help reduce smoking rates among people experiencing health inequalities. 

The pack is designed as a set of pragmatic tools, setting out the problems and solutions, to support the case for targeted tobacco control in groups with high smoking prevalence. Below you will find a range of briefings about population groups which experience higher rates of smoking and tobacco addiction as well as a compilation of ASH’s resources on health inequalities and how best to tackle them.

Briefings

In addition to our Health Inequalities and Smoking briefing, you can find a range of shorter, condensed briefings on specific population groups below.

Condensed briefing on the relationship between smoking and low socio-economic groups. September 2019. Download here.

Condensed briefing on the relationship between smoking and people in contact with the criminal justice system. September 2019.

Download here.

Condensed briefing on the relationship between smoking and mental health conditions. September 2019.

Download here.

Condensed briefing on the relationship between smoking and people with multiple needs. September 2019.

Download here.

Condensed briefing on the relationship between smoking and people with long-term conditions. September 2019.

Download here.

Condensed briefing on the relationship between smoking and pregnancy. September 2019.

Download here.

Condensed briefing on the relationship between smoking and the LGBT communities. September 2019.

Download here.

Condensed briefing on the relationship between smoking and people experiencing homelessness. September 2019.

Download here.

Condensed briefing on the relationship between tobacco and ethnic minority groups in Great Britain. September 2019.

Download here.

Condensed briefing on how price and affordability of tobacco relates to health inequalities. September 2019.

Download here.

Tools and Resources

The quitting dividend for tenants and landlords

The quitting dividend for tenants and landlords explores the financial impact of smoking on social housing tenants and providers.

Smoking in the home: New solutions for a Smokefree Generation

This report focuses in detail on the need for greater support for social housing tenants to quit and the significant contribution this could make to eliminating health and wider inequality.

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Smoking and poverty

An analysis of the financial impact of tobacco addiction on people's finances and the impact this has on household poverty levels.

Webinars

Webinars on smoking in pregnancy, smoking and mental health and smoking related health inequalities, including a webinar relaunching the Health Inequalities Resource Pack.

Mental Health & Smoking Partnership

The Partnership aims to bring together organisations committed to improving the health and lives of people with mental health conditions and has a range of resources to support this goal.

Smoking in Pregnancy Challenge Group

The Challenge Group is a coalition of health and baby charities committed to reducing rates of smoking in pregnancy and has produced a range of briefings to support smokefree pregnancies.

This page will regularly be updated with the latest ASH resources on health inequalities