ASH Daily News for 7 November 2018



print
UK

  • Imperial gives Blu investment green light
  • NHS Confederation: New focus on prevention shows great leadership and could be a seminal moment

International

  • Study: It takes smokers’ hearts at least 15 years to recover after quitting cigarettes
  • Study: Smoking during pregnancy may increase risk of childhood eye condition

UK

Imperial gives Blu investment green light

Imperial Brands, one of the world’s biggest tobacco companies, is investing an extra $100 million in its e-cigarette brand, Blu. This is more than double Imperial’s current investment.

Pressures arising from increasing awareness of the health risks of smoking, regulatory clampdowns and competition from alternative reduced risk products, have prompted a number of the major tobacco companies to invest heavily in so-called next generation products in an effort to deliver growth.

Yesterday The Chief Executive of Imperial Brands, Alison Cooper, appeared on BBC Radio 4’s Today Programme to discuss the e-cigarette market and Imperial’s role in the tobacco industry.

Source: The Times, 7 November 2018

Imperial Brands on BBC Radio 4 Today Programme 06/11/18 (listen from approx. 1:16:00)

Read Article

NHS Confederation: New focus on prevention shows great leadership and could be a seminal moment

Niall Dickson, chief executive of the NHS Confederation, which represents organisations across the healthcare sector, responding to the Department of Health and Social Care’s new prevention strategy:

“Preventing illness and disease is huge area with enormous potential – much of it extending well beyond the NHS. Our members have a vital part to play by working in partnership with local government… As part of that we must do more to tackle smoking.

The war against tobacco has been one of our greatest public health success stories of the last generation, but we have not done well enough in supporting poorer communities. Smoking is the single biggest cause of inequality in death rates between rich and poor in the UK. It accounts for more than half the difference in death rates between poor and the better off in the UK. Yet incredibly in England we have seen cuts in smoking cessation services.

It’s time for real intent around prevention and an acceptance that if we are going to make this a priority, it will mean tough choices about how health money is spent.”

Source: Wired Gov, 6 November 2018

Read Article

International

Study: It takes smokers’ hearts at least 15 years to recover after quitting cigarettes

Research which will be presented at next week’s American Heart Association conference, has found that former smokers’ risk of heart disease and stroke takes 15 years to fall to the same level as that of non-smokers.

The researchers analysed data on 8,700 people spanning 50 years, finding that it takes well over a decade for smokers’ hearts to rid themselves of the life-threatening damage from cigarette smoking. Heart disease is the leading cause of mortality globally and cigarette smoking is one of the major risk factors for developing the disease.

Study author, Meredith Duncan PhD, said: “What’s key to remember is that the actual risk of heart attack and other forms of cardiovascular disease goes down [when people quit smoking], and this is a main finding of our current study. So even for heavy smokers, we cannot overstate the benefits of quitting smoking.”

Source: Mail on Sunday, 6 November 2018

Journal of the National Cancer Institute: Lifetime Smoking History and Risk of Lung Cancer: Results From the Framingham Heart Study

Read Article

Study: Smoking during pregnancy may increase risk of childhood eye condition

A new study has found that maternal smoking during pregnancy is associated with a 46% increased risk that offspring will develop strabismus—one of the most prevalent eye-related diseases among children.

The researchers from the Huazhong University of Science and Technology conducted a meta-analysis of 11 studies, finding that maternal smoking of 10 or more cigarettes per day was linked with a 79% increased risk of strabismus in children, compared with 17% increased risk for maternal smoking of less than 10 cigarettes per day, resulting in an average of 46%.
Study author Dr. Zuxun Lu, said: “Maternal smoking during pregnancy is an important public health problem, particularly in developed countries, and its effect on offspring eye health deserves our attention.”

Source: Medical Xpress, 7 November 2018

Acta Ophthalmologica: Maternal smoking during pregnancy and the risk of strabismus in offspring: a meta‐analysis

Read Article