ASH Daily News for 14 January 2019



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UK
  • PMI to stop selling cigarettes in UK by 2030
  • Thurrock council uses sniffer dogs to locate illicit tobacco

International

  • USA: Air pollution equal to smoking in raising risk of miscarriage
  • Jordan: Mayor of Amman calls for ministers to stop smoking in parliament

UK

PMI to stop selling cigarettes in UK by 2030

Philip Morris International (PMI), the maker of Marlboro, Chesterfield and L&M, has said it aims stop selling cigarettes in the UK by 2030.

With new research from Public Health England (PHE) suggesting that parts of the UK could be smokefree by as early as 2024, PMI’s director of corporate affairs in the UK, Mark MacGregor, has stated that 2030 “seems a realistic time frame to pull cigarettes from sale.” PMI’s primary focus will be on tobacco alternatives such as e-cigarettes or heated tobacco products, which are currently thought to be far less harmful that traditional tobacco.

Source: The Daily Star, 11 January 2019

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Thurrock council uses sniffer dogs to locate illicit tobacco

Dogs have been used to track counterfeit and illegal cigarettes in Thurrock with officers seizing almost 67,000 cigarettes during the latest round of inspection in December, funded by Public Health through the local Tobacco Control Alliance.

Thurrock Council deputy leader, Councillor Shane Hebb said: “I’m delighted that Trading Standards has pulled more than 67,000 cigarettes off the streets during this latest inspection. Public safety is our top priority and we will continue to work with residents and our partners in tracking down counterfeit and non-duty paid tobacco.”

Source: Thurrock Independent, 21 December 2018

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International

USA: Air pollution equal to smoking in raising risk of miscarriage

New research conducted in the USA has found that air pollution is comparable to smoking for pregnant women in raising the risk of miscarriage. It is already known that exposure to air pollution can increase the risk of premature birth and low birth weight, but this latest study has also found that raised levels of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) increased the risk of losing a pregnancy by 16%. This figure is comparable to the percentage of pregnancies lost due to smoking tobacco.

In this study, women’s exposure to air pollution at the time of the miscarriage was compared with similar times in another pregnancy when she did not miscarry, meaning that age, weight, income and other factors were accounted for. There was a link with a lost pregnancy and the level of NO2 in the seven days before the miscarriage. Although the mechanism by which air pollution could harm a foetus has not yet been established it is hypothesised that the pollutants cause oxidative stress and inflammation.

Dr Sarah Stock, at the University of Edinburgh said: “Air pollution is clearly detrimental to the health of millions of mothers, babies and children worldwide. Measures to reduce the impact of air pollution are crucial to ensure the health of future generations.”

Study: Acute effects of air pollutants on spontaneous pregnancy loss: a case-crossover study

Source: The Guardian, 11 January 2019

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Jordan: Mayor of Amman calls for ministers to stop smoking in parliament

The Mayor of Jordan’s capital, Amman has called for government ministers to lead by example and stop smoking in parliament. Citing a recent vote regarding banning smoking in some public places, which saw some ministers voting in favour whilst smoking cigarettes, Yousef Shawarbeh argues that the government needs to take responsibility.

Smoking rates in Jordan are high, with more than half of the male population smoking. Shisha or waterpipes are also popular, with people smoking them on coffee breaks or for social occasions.

With smoking so widely accepted as a cultural norm, Mr Shawarbeh states that implementation and enforcement of stop smoking laws are key challenges despite having the legislative framework, political will and the support for the Royal Family.

Source: The Guardian, 12 January 2018

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