ASH Daily News for 9 January 2019



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UK

  • One in seven mums in Derbyshire smoked during their pregnancy
  • Kent could struggle to meet government targets on getting smokers to quit
  • Wembley shop owner fined for illegal tobacco products

International

  • Cigarette smoking hits all-time low in the US but rates are still high in poor communities
  • Study: Strong tobacco retail licensing requirements reduce risk of teen tobacco use

UK

One in seven mums in Derbyshire smoked during their pregnancy

Derbyshire County Council is set to spend £120,000 to help reduce high rates of smoking in pregnancy in the county, which has a smoking at time of delivery (SATOD) rate of 14.1%. This works out as more than 1,000 women continuing to smoke at the time of delivery each year. However, this has dropped from 16.8% in 2010 and the rate continues to fall.

The 2017 Tobacco Control Plan for England established an ambition to reduce rates of smoking in pregnancy to 6% or less by 2022, but Derbyshire County Council is concerned that it is not likely to achieve this target for another 15 years as it would require 600 pregnant women to quit each year.

The council is calling for a concerted effort by all Derbyshire authorities who work with pregnant smokers to help reduce SATOD rates. It is committing £120,000 over two years to establish two Smokefree Champions among midwifery staff to ensure that carbon monoxide tests are carried out regularly and that maternity staff are trained to address smoking in pregnancy.

Source: Derbyshire Times, 8 January 2019

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Kent could struggle to meet government targets on getting smokers to quit

According to a recent council report, around 58,500 smokers in Kent need to quit by 2022 to meet Government targets. The 2017 Tobacco Control Plan for England set an ambitious target to reduce smoking prevalence to only 12% of the population, which would lead to around 620 fewer cases of lung cancer and 832 fewer incidents of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

Kent County Council is planning to change its tactics by targeting people before they start smoking, focussing on routine and manual workers among whom the smoking rate is 32.4%. The local authority also plans to promote smokefree areas such as outside school gates, prisons and healthcare centres.

Source: Kent Online, 8 January 2019

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Wembley shop owner fined for illegal tobacco products

A Wembley shop owner was fined more than £4,000 after he was caught selling counterfeit tobacco products.

Ziad Hassan-Pasha, 35, of Victoria Road, Wembley, admitted to selling cigarettes and vaping products that did not have the required warnings on them. After a Trading Standards investigation, he was ordered to pay a £250 fine per offence, in addition to costs and a victim surcharge, totalling £4,366.

Cllr Tom Miller, responsible for stronger communities at Brent Council, said: “Shops that sell tobacco products without the proper health warnings are putting the public at potential risk and this is simply unacceptable. This conviction shows just how serious we are about coming down hard on those found to be selling illegal cigarettes and tobacco products in Brent. Our message to traders is simple: it’s your responsibility to make sure that your products are compliant and have the proper health warnings, or we will take formal action if you disregard the law.”

Source: Asian Voice, 8 January 2019

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International

Cigarette smoking hits all-time low in the US but rates are still high in poor communities

According to new research published in the journal, JAMA Internal Medicine, rates of cigarette smoking have fallen to an all-time low of 14% in the US. But figures have stagnated in poorer communities, where smoking-related cancers are far more common than in more affluent areas.

The study is an analysis of data from the 500 Cities Project, which collected self-reported data on smoking, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and coronary heart disease. Researchers found stark differences in smoking rates between groups, with smoking much higher among poor, non-white Americans.

Source: Business Telegraph, 9 January 2019

JAMA Internal Medicine: Place-Based Inequity in Smoking Prevalence in the Largest Cities in the United States

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Study: Strong tobacco retail licensing requirements reduce risk of teen tobacco use

According to a recent study, teenagers who live in areas with strong licensing regulations could be at lower risk of tobacco or e-cigarette use.

The researchers compared rates of tobacco product use among youth who lived in areas that had strong tobacco vendor licensing requirements with rates in areas with weak retail licensing regulation. They found that in places that had strong retail licensing requirements, risks of tobacco product use were lower by one-third to one-half compared to places with weaker requirements.

Dr. James Sargent, a professor of paediatrics in the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth University, said: “Youth obtain their product, in part, through retail sales, and if you can do a good job of making sure that youth can’t buy through retailers, the implication is that communities that have that characteristic, that abide by the best standards for retail practices, will have lower rates of use.”

Source: CNN, 7 January 2019

Pediatrics: Tobacco Retail Licensing and Youth Product Use

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