ASH Daily News for 9 August 2018



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UK

  • North East: Campaign launched as hospital is set to become a smokefree zone

International

  • Ireland: Casual smokers dangerously unaware of the health risks
  • China: Xi’an city to ban smoking indoors
  • Tariffs on Chinese goods could harm US vaping industry
  • Smoking estimated to cost Japan over ¥2 trillion

UK

North East: Campaign launched as hospital is set to become a smokefree zone

North Tees and Hartlepool NHS Foundation Trust is raising awareness about smoking cessation services among patients and staff, as part of a pledge to go smokefree by March 2019.

The trust is offering nicotine replacement therapy and a referral to the community stop-smoking service for patients who smoke.

Clare Henry, the trust’s specialist alcohol and tobacco nurse advisor, said: “over the next few months we will be spreading the message to as many people as possible about what we can all do to help go smokefree. We understand there are many reasons why people might choose to smoke outside the hospital… what we are looking to stress to people is the importance to have a healthy environment around our hospital sites… we are here to help smokers to quit.”

Source: Hartlepool Mail, 9 August 2018

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International

Ireland: Casual smokers dangerously unaware of the health risks

A study published by the Royal College of Physicians of Ireland (RCPI) has found that people who only smoke a few cigarettes a week have a 40% greater risk of dying from a smoking-related disease compared with non-smokers.

Casual smokers, who account for one fifth of Irish smokers, are dangerously unaware of the risks associated with casual smoking, particularly over longer time periods. This problem is particularly acute for women aged 35 to 49 who smoke between one and four cigarettes a day, increasing their chances of developing lung cancer by one fifth.

Doctor Des Cox, chairman of the policy group on tobacco at the RCPI, said that casual smokers “carry almost the same risk of cardiovascular disease as daily smokers. While great progress has been made to reduce smoking rates in Ireland, we still have 20 per cent of under-25s taking [it] up. This pattern of smoking is often perceived to have lesser risk and people continue this pattern of smoking over longer periods, increasing their long-term exposure to tobacco smoke.”

Source: The Times, 9 August 2018

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China: Xi’an city to ban smoking indoors

Xi’an, capital of Northwest China’s Shaanxi province has announced a ban on smoking indoors in public places.

The ban, which will come into force on 1 November, will also prohibit smoking in some outdoor public venues and will issue fines of up to ¥1000 for venue owners who fail to enforce the regulation.

China currently has around 300 million smokers and has pledged to reduce the smoking rate from 27.7% to 20% by 2030.

Source: China Daily, 8 August 2018

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Tariffs on Chinese goods could harm US vaping industry

Proposed levies on US imports from China could increase the price of e-cigarettes by around 15%. The US vape industry imported 91% of its vaping products from China in 2016, leaving them vulnerable to the US government’s proposed tariff on Chinese goods.

According to a study in the Journal of Tobacco Control, this could cause a knock-on reduction in sales of approximately 12% and 19% for disposable and reusable e-cigarettes respectively. The vape industry is particularly sensitive to price increases due to the relative affordability of vaping compared to smoking.

Euromonitor International’s Head of Tobacco Research, Shane MacGuill, said the tariff could have a “significant detrimental impact on the vapour product industry.”

Source: Reuters, 8 August 2018

Journal of Tobacco Control: The impact of price and tobacco control policies on the demand for electronic nicotine delivery systems

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Smoking estimated to cost Japan over ¥2 trillion

Japan’s Health Ministry has said that smoking cost the country ¥2.05 trillion in 2015, equivalent to around £14 billion.

Smoker’s medical fees accounted for over half the total at ¥1.26 trillion, with cancer treatment and treatment for passive smoking costing ¥500 billion and ¥330 billion respectively. This is in addition to a further ¥260 billion in nursing care fees for smoking-related diseases and ¥98 billion for smoking-related fires.

Ataru Igarashi, a member of the Health Ministry’s team and a specially appointed associate professor at the University of Tokyo, said: “We have found that smoking not only increases medical costs but also leads to financial losses in a range of areas such as nursing care.”

Source: Japan Today, 9 August 2018

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