ASH Daily News for 7 August 2018



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UK

  • Sunderland: Fire chiefs issue safety advice after suspected vape battery fire
  • Norfolk: Roadshow will provide information about illegal cigarettes and tobacco
  • Former smokers might want to eat more tomatoes

International

  • US: Tobacco marketed more heavily in city’s minority neighbourhoods, study finds
  • US: Secondhand smoke is giving teens severe breathing problems, study says

UK

Sunderland: Fire chiefs issue safety advice after suspected vape battery fire

Fire chiefs have issued safety advice after a fire in a family home which is thought to have been caused by a vape battery.

They advised that vapers never overcharge or leave e-cigarettes on charge unattended for long periods, not to mix components of different e-cigarettes and ensure they purchase their e-cigarette from a reputable source. Moreover, they recommend that users check the e-cigarette carries a CE certification, always use the correct charger and follow the manufacturer’s instructions.

See also:
National Fire Chief Council, Guidance on e-cigarettes

Source: Sunderland Echo, 6 August 2018

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Norfolk: Roadshow will provide information about illegal cigarettes and tobacco

This Thursday, between 9am and 5pm, residents will be able to meet Yoyo the tobacco sniffer dog at Kings Square in Thetford. This visit is part of a bigger illegal tobacco roadshow, which will also be visiting King’s Lynn, Great Yarmouth and Norwich.

The purpose is to help people find out more about illegal cigarettes and tobacco, and the hazards they pose. So far, a two-year clampdown on illicit traders has seen Norfolk County Council’s Trading Standards and Public Health teams seize more than 1.3 million illegal cigarettes in addition to 123kg of illegal hand rolling tobacco, with 11 traders being prosecuted.

Smokefree Norfolk will also be present at the roadshow to provide residents with help on quitting smoking.

Source: Thetford and Brandon Times, 6 August 2018

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Former smokers might want to eat more tomatoes

A new study has found that former smokers with diets high in tomatoes and fresh fruit had a slower rate of decline in lung function.

Researchers also found that among all adults, including people who had never smoked or had stopped, those with the highest tomato consumption had the slowest decline in lung function—meaning the benefits may not just be for former smokers. The study offers important evidence for the effect of diet on lung function.

See also:
European Respiratory Journal, Dietary antioxidants and 10-year lung function decline in adults from the ECRHS survey

Source: Vice, 6 August 2018

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International

US: Tobacco marketed more heavily in city’s minority neighbourhoods, study finds

Tobacco products in Milwaukee, Wisconsin are more aggressively marketed in stores in African-American and Latino neighbourhoods than in white ones, according to a study led by a public health researcher at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.

Results are in line with other studies, showing that communities with lower incomes, lower educational attainment and more minority residents are targeted with significantly more tobacco promotion.

This study is the first to document the trend in Milwaukee. “The evidence is increasingly clear that children who are exposed to tobacco marketing in stores are more likely to start smoking,” said Linnea Laestadius, assistant professor in the Zilber School of Public Health.

See also:
Tobacco Regulatory Science, Identifying Disparities and Policy Needs with the STARS Surveillance Tool

Source: Medical Xpress, 6 August 2018

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US: Secondhand smoke is giving teens severe breathing problems, study says

A study has found that young people are missing school due to breathing problems caused by secondhand smoke. Young people who live with a smoker are more likely to report shortness of breath, wheezing and difficulty performing exercise. Those exposed to more than an hour of secondhand smoke had a 1.5 times increased risk of frequently missing school due to being sick. Additionally, they were 3.5 times more likely to have visited an urgent care facility or an emergency department over the past 12 months. The team of researchers from the University of Cincinnati in Ohio, is therefore calling on lawmakers to implement policy changes that further prohibit smoking in public places in all 50 states, to prevent teens from developing a number of health problems including asthma and lung cancer.

Lead author Dr Ashley Merianos, an assistant professor of health promotion and education at the University of Cincinnati, said “There was a [lack] of information about how [secondhand smoke] affects adolescents [without asthma], so we decided to look into this specific group of people.” The young people who took part in the study were part of the Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health Study, a US government study that looks at tobacco use and health among adolescents and adults.

Source: Mail Online, 6 August 2018

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