ASH Daily News for 6 June 2019



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UK

  • Argos recalls e-cigarettes over safety concerns
  • Clinical update: Tobacco related oral cancer
  • Scotland: Head and Neck cancer on the rise in Lanarkshrie
  • Study: Smoking doesn’t affect telomeres – a biological indicator of aging

International

  • USA: Poor mental health increases chance of teen cigarette and e-cigarette use

UK

Argos recalls e-cigarettes over safety concerns

Argos has recalled 6 models of e-cigarette amid concerns that the devices could overheat. The retailer has stated that the external battery provided isn’t compatible with the models sold, which could potentially cause the devices to overheat. The affected e-cigarettes are certain models made by Smok and Innokin although Argos says the batteries weren’t supplied by these
manufacturers.

Source: The Sun, 5 June 2019

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Clinical update: Tobacco related oral cancer

The British Medical Journal has released updated clinical advice for general practitioners, dentists and nurses on how to recognise and manage oral cancer.

Oral cancer accounts for over 140,000 deaths annually across the world and the incidence of oral cancer in the UK has increased by 68% over the last 20 years. Most oral cancers result from tobacco smoking or using tobacco in other forms. The odds of developing oral cancer are almost five times higher among those who smoke compared with those who do not. A similar risk was observed among those who used smokeless tobacco.

Source: The BMJ, 5 June 2019

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Scotland: Head and Neck cancer on the rise in Lanarkshire

The number of cases of head and neck cancer in Lanarkshire have increased dramatically over the last few years, with a 51% increase in cases between 2016 and 2017. Professor Mark McGurk, co-founder of the Head and Neck Cancer Foundation (HNCF), also said that head and neck cancers are becoming more prevalent in young people.

Gordon Matheson, of Cancer Research UK, said: “While there are many reasons why we’re seeing more people develop cancer, including an ageing population, there’s much that people can do to stack the odds in their favour. Smoking remains the number one preventable cause of cancer, followed by carrying too much weight which is linked to 13 types of the disease.”

Source: Daily Record, 5 June 2019

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Study: Smoking doesn’t affect telomeres – a biological indicator of ageing

A new study, published in Open Science, has found that smoking does not affect the length of telomeres – a marker at the end of chromosomes that is regarded as a good indicator of ageing. The meta-analysis of 18 previously collected datasets led by researchers at Newcastle University shows that while smokers do have shorter telomeres, importantly there is no evidence that smoking causes telomeres to shorten faster than among non-smokers.

The Newcastle team are continuing research in this area to examine whether a third variable, potential early childhood experiences could be linked to both shorter telomeres and smoking status.

The findings change previous understanding of telomere length which understood the length to respond dynamically to current adult behaviour, shortening more when we engage in activities such as smoking and perhaps lengthening in response to healthier behaviours. However, this study suggests that adult telomere length should be reinterpreted as a static biomarker that changes relatively little during adult life.

Source: Science Daily, 5 June 2019

See study: Smoking does not accelerate leucocyte telomere attrition: a meta-analysis of 18 longitudinal cohorts

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International

USA: Poor mental health increases chance of teen cigarette and e-cigarette use

A recent study, published in Paediatrics, has found that teenagers with mental health illnesses are more likely to take up cigarette and e-cigarette use compared to others. When examining the results differences were also found between those showing externalising and internalising symptoms. Amongst those with mental health illnesses aged between 12-17, those who expressed at least 4 externalising symptoms of mental ill health – such as impulsive or disruptive behaviours and substance use – were more likely to use these products compared to teens with low externalising behaviours.

Comparatively, adolescents with 4 or more internalising symptoms, such as anxiety or depression, were more likely to begin using e-cigarettes, but no more likely to begin using combustible cigarettes compared to teens with no or nominal symptoms.

Source: Medpage Today, 3 June 2019

See study: Metal Heath Problems and Initiation of E-cigarette and Combustible Cigarette Use

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