ASH Daily News for 31 January 2017



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  • Council urging people to keep Stockport playgrounds smokefree
  • Calls for controls on smoking as staggering medical costs revealed
  • France: Upbeat cigarette names to be banned
  • Australia: How Australia is stubbing out smoking
  • Australia: Smoking ban introduced in Queensland’s national parks
  • Africa: ‘Lifestyle diseases’ pose grave challenges to Africa

Council urging people to keep Stockport playgrounds smokefree

Over 100 play areas across Stockport have been fitted with new signs to help keep them smokefree. Stockport Council asks park users to not smoke in and around playgrounds to protect children.

Councillor Sheila Bailey, Executive Member for Communities and Housing, said: “There is no risk free level of exposure to secondhand smoke. Secondhand smoke causes numerous health problems in infants and children. Children’s play areas should be smokefree areas”.

Source: Imagine FM – 30 January 2017
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Calls for controls on smoking as staggering medical costs revealed

Health bodies have called for greater controls on smoking after a study revealed that it accounts for one-twentieth of the world’s health costs. The deadly habit cost the world economy $1.4tn (£1.12tn, €1.31tn) in 2012, according to a new study published on Tuesday, 31st January.

According to experts from the World Health Organization and the American Cancer Society, the total spent on medical costs associated with smoking are equivalent to 2% of the world’s GDP.

See also:
Treating ill smokers costs the world £1.14 trillion, Express

Source: International Business Times – 31 January 2017
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France: Upbeat cigarette names to be banned

Cigarette brands whose names sound too evocative and positive are to be banned in France. A plan to ban the sale of brands such as Vogue cigarettes and Marlboro Gold as well as a make of cigarillos called Café Crème has been revealed.

The ban forms part of a bid to further cut numbers of smokers in France and follows on from the law which required all cigarettes to be sold in plain packs. It is also in line with a new EU directive on smoking, which says that ‘we must not encourage smoking with overly attractive names that are too evocative of positive images’.

See also:
Plusieurs marques de cigarettes vont être interdites, Le Monde (in French)

Source: The Connexion – 31 January 2017
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Australia: How Australia is stubbing out smoking

It’s already five years since Australia became the first place in the world to make plain cigarette packaging compulsory. Tobacco advertising has long been banned. Researchers say that as a consequence of stricter regulations, a culture of shame surrounding smoking has begun to emerge, which itself has become a smoking deterrent.

The Government has committed to reduce the number of adults smoking on a daily basis to 10% by 2018. Alongside other measures, tobacco taxes rose 25% in 2010, and are now rising 12.5% every year.

Source: BBC News – 30 January 2017
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Australia: Smoking ban introduced in Queensland’s national parks

The Queensland Government is concerned the air is not fresh enough in national parks, citing air quality and passive smoking as key reasons for a partial smoking ban that comes into force this week. The new restrictions apply to people near picnic tables and barbecues, toilet blocks, jetties and information shelters in Queensland’s 272 national parks and campsites.

Park rangers can issue on-the-spot fines of $243 for people caught smoking within 10 metres of facilities.

Source: ABC News – 31 January 2017
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Africa: ‘Lifestyle diseases’ pose grave challenges to Africa

Africa will have the world’s largest increase in non-communicable disease (NCD) deaths over the next decade. Although communicable diseases such as malaria, TB and HIV/AIDS and other conditions still predominate in sub-Saharan Africa, WHO projects that, by 2030, NCDs will become the leading cause of death.

More and more young people in Africa are taking up the habit. In Zambia, for example, about one quarter of secondary school students aged 13 to 15 either smoke or use other tobacco products. In South Africa, 24% of boys and 19% of girls in secondary school use tobacco.

Source: InDepthNews – 30 January 2017
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