ASH Daily news for 30 September 2015



HEADLINES

  • Smoking ban in prisons to be introduced in 2016
  • Smokefree timeline
  • One in five smokers unaware of new law prohibiting smoking in cars
  • Questions over enforcement of smoking in cars ban
  • Largest NHS trust to become ‘smoke free’ next month
  • Early exposure to tobacco as a cause of behavioural problems in children
  • Canada: Suing tobacco firms for health care costs is constitutional
  • India: Delays implementation of bigger tobacco pack warnings

    Smoking ban in prisons to be introduced in 2016

    The government has announced that smoking will be banned in all prisons starting with Welsh prisons and four in England from next year to reduce health risks to inmates and staff, after air quality data was found to be worse than anticipated.

    Prisons minister, Andrew Selous said that the ban would not be rolled out overnight but would be phased in.

    Deborah Arnott, chief executive of ASH, said: “In light of the high levels of tobacco smoke in prisons, we are pleased that prisons in England and Wales will finally be going smoke-free, something ASH has been calling for since 2005. However, the plan only covers England and Wales, and we urge prison authorities in Scotland and Northern Ireland to follow suit.”
    See also:
    Prison chiefs fear unrest over introduction of smoking ban – The Times (£)
    Prison smoking ban begins in 2016 despite fears of unrest – The Guardian
    Prison smoking ban to begin in 2016 – BBC
    Smoking to be banned in eight prisons – BT
    Prison smoking ban to be phased in from 2016 to reduce health risks for inmates and guards – International Business Times

    Source: Western Daily Press, 29th September 2015
    Link: http://bit.ly/1JBZXxm

    Smokefree timeline

    As the ban on smoking in cars with children present comes into effect, Jeremy Laurance provides a timeline of smokefree interventions, from 1965 until present.

    Source: The Independent, 29th September 2015
    Link: http://ind.pn/1KRamWR

    One in five smokers unaware of new law prohibiting smoking in cars

    One in five smokers are unware that smoking in cars with children present will be illegal from the 1st October, according to a survey.

    Those found smoking in a vehicle with someone under the age of 18 present, will be breaking the law and could face a fine of £50. Yet, according to a poll conducted on confused.com, 50% of smokers said the ban will be ineffective – despite 90% agreeing that the ban was a good thing.

    Source: Mirror, 30th September 2015
    Link: http://bit.ly/1h9MAOn

    Questions over enforcement of smoking in cars ban

    Some people have questioned the enforcement of the smoking in cars law by the police after chief officers indicated that they will not be applying the law forcefully and will focus instead on taking a “non-confrontational” approach.

    A spokesman for the National Police Chiefs’ Council said drivers would be “educated” rather than prosecuted.

    The spokesman said: “As the existing smoke-free law extends to vehicles, police forces will be following guidance from the Chartered Institute of Environmental Health by taking an educational, advisory and non-confrontational approach when enforcing the new legislation.”

    See also:
    ‘Blind eye’ by cops to car fag law – The Sun (£)
    Smoking ban farce: Police vow to IGNORE new law coming into force tomorrow that makes it illegal to light up in cars with children – Mail On Sunday

    Source: The Telegraph, 29th September 2015
    Link: http://bit.ly/1O7uWcw

    Largest NHS trust to become ‘smoke free’ next month

    On 1 October, Barts Health NHS Trust in east London is to begin an ambitious initiative to stamp out smoking among its workforce and patients.

    All staff, patients and visitors at the trust’s five hospital sites will not be allowed to smoke or use electronic cigarettes anywhere on its premises, including doorways and car parks.

    The trust, the largest in England, said it had committed to extending smoke free areas to anywhere on its premises to create a “healthier environment” for patients, visitors and staff.

    Visitors spotted smoking will be asked to extinguish the cigarette and to leave the premises should they wish to continue smoking.

    Meanwhile, staff will be supported to stop smoking by self-referring online to a local NHS support group, either near to their home or close to work, said the trust.

    Source: Nursing Times, 29th September 2015
    Link: http://bit.ly/1FHGNeg

    Early exposure to tobacco as a cause of behavioural problems in children

    Researchers from Inserm and Pierre and Marie Curie University (UPMC), in collaboration with the university hospitals of 6 French cities, have analysed data on pre- and postnatal exposure to tobacco in the homes of 5,200 primary school children.

    They show that this exposure is associated with a risk of behavioural disorders in children, particularly emotional and conduct disorders. The association is stronger when exposure takes place both during pregnancy and after birth. These data show the risk associated with smoking in early life and its behavioural repercussions when the child is of school-going age.

    Source: Bright Surf, 29th September 2015
    Link: http://bit.ly/1iKKfKE

    Canada: Suing tobacco firms for health care costs is constitutional

    The Quebec government has the constitutional right to sue tobacco companies to recover health care costs, Quebec’s Court of Appeal ruled on Monday.

    The appeals made by the tobacco industry were dismissed.

    The ruling only applies to whether attempting to recover the cost of health care and damages related to tobacco is constitutional. The suit asked for more than $60 billion to reimburse the costs incurred from caring for Quebec residents with illnesses linked to tobacco products.

    Source: CBC News, 29th September 2015
    Link: http://bit.ly/1iKKUfk

    India: Delays implementation of bigger tobacco pack warnings

    India has decided to delay implementation of bigger health warnings on tobacco packaging by a year until April 2016, as pressure mounts on New Delhi to take urgent steps to reduce tobacco consumption which kills up to 900,000 people a year.

    India last year said 85 percent of a cigarette packet’s surface should be covered in health warnings, up from about 20 percent now. But the rules, originally to be enforced from April this year, were deferred after a parliamentary panel said it was reviewing how the industry will be impacted.

    Source: Medical Daily, 29th September 2015
    Link: http://bit.ly/1iKLoC2