ASH Daily News for 30 May 2019



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UK 

  • Smoking in cars decreases resale value
  • Wales: Illicit tobacco seller on Facebook given community order

International 

  • Europe: 90% of lung cancers could be avoided by eliminating tobacco use
  • WHO raises concerns PMI’s attempt to reclaim World No Tobacco Day
  • Germany: Research Centre dedicated to study of control in addiction

UK

Smoking in cars decreases resale value

Smoking in cars can decrease the resale value of the vehicle by up to £2,000, according to new research by HPI. The two main reasons given for this are physical damage to the interior caused by smoke and the smell of smoke which becomes ingrained in the fabric.

Fernando Garcia, consumer director at HPI said: “Everyone knows that smoking is bad for our health, but few people realise that it can also have a surprisingly nasty impact on the value of your car”.

Source: Express, 29 May 2019

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Wales: Illicit tobacco seller on Facebook given community order

A man who was caught selling illicit tobacco on Facebook in Powys has been given a 12 month community order as part of Operation Date, an ongoing operation to reduce the supply of illicit tobacco in the county.

The man pleaded guilty to three offences for offering to supply and sell illicit tobacco and two offence for the tobacco products not having required health warnings in English.

Source: Powys Country Times, 29 May 2019

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International 

Europe: 90% of lung cancers could be avoided by eliminating tobacco use

A new report from the World Health Organisation (WHO) has found that 9 in 10 deaths from lung and respiratory tract cancers in Europe are related to tobacco. This means that 90% of lung cancers can be avoided by eliminating the use of tobacco. The report emphasises the need for parties to the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) to increase tobacco prevention policy from health interventions, to marketing, to fiscal policy and stronger regulation. One of the recommendations in the report is for countries to consider embedding tobacco control in the sustainable development agenda and approaching it from a human rights perspective.

The report found other concerning trends that highlight the need for strong action on tobacco control, including:

·                   18% of noncommunicable disease (NCD) deaths were attributable to tobacco use in 2018 in Europe, meaning almost 1 in 5 premature NCD deaths could be avoided by eliminating tobacco use,

·                   27% of cancer deaths were attributable to tobacco use in 2018,

·                   21% of women (74 million) currently smoke in Europe, the highest percentage globally,

Kristina Mauer-Stender, Programme Manager for Tobacco Control at WHO/Europe said: “There is a huge potential to improve health by implementing policies that we know are effective, such as increasing taxation, using plain packaging, banning advertising and eliminating exposure to second-hand smoke. Without countries taking action, we will miss the opportunity to use tobacco control as a major lever for improving public health”

Source: World Health Organisation, 29 May 2019

See report: European Tobacco Use, Trends Report 2019

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WHO raises concerns PMI’s attempt to reclaim World No Tobacco Day

The World Health Organisation (WHO) has raised concerns over Philip Morris Internationals (PMI) attempt to rebrand up coming World No Tobacco Day as World No Smoking Day. PMI launched its own campaign this week to coincide with World No Tobacco Day calling for smokers to give up smoking in favour of e-cigarettes and heated tobacco.

Vinayak Prasad, head of WHO’s Tobacco Free Initiative said “We regard the PMI campaign as little more than a cynical attempt by the company to promote its deadly products”.

Source: Medical Xpress, 29 May 2019

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Germany: Research Centre dedicated to study of control in addiction

A new collaborative research centre has been set up in Germany which is set to examine the small percentage of people who overcome addiction without any external assistance. The new transregional Collaborative Research Center (SFB/TRR) ‘Losing and Regaining Control in Addiction – Development, Mechanisms and Interventions’, is being led by Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin. It  aims to use its findings to promote the development of personalised treatments for a variety of addictions, including tobacco.

The team will be observing the day-to-day behaviour of addicts using apps, cognitive performance assessments and mood reporting. These will be used to gain insights into addiction related changes to cognitive control and decision making, as well as the effects of addiction related urges on behaviour.

Prof. Dr. Andreas Heinz, Director of the Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy on Campus Charité Mitte and official spokesperson for the new centre said: “Some addicts do manage to regain control over their levels of consumption without any professional assistance. We want to learn from these people: what mechanisms do they develop in order to break the cycle of addiction? We hope to be able to use this knowledge to develop targeted interventions for other persons with addiction.”

Source: Science Magazine, 29 May 2019

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