ASH Daily News for 30 August 2016


  • Research: Study finds adverse short-term effect of vaping on aortic stiffness

    A new study, which involved 24 adults with an average age of 30, has suggested that a typical vaping session has a similar impact on stiffness of the aorta – the main artery into the heart – as smoking one regular cigarette. The study examined the immediate effects of e-cigarettes and smoking.

    However, Deborah Arnott, chief executive of Action on Smoking and Health, said: “This study does not prove that e-cigarettes are as hazardous as smoking.” She highlighted other findings from the study, showing that if a vaping session was limited to five minutes, the impact on aortic stiffness was significantly less than that associated with a cigarette.

    Rosanna O’Connor, from Public Health England, said: “Vaping carries a fraction of the risk of smoking yet many smokers are still not aware, which could be keeping people smoking rather than switching to a much less harmful alternative.”

    See also:
    Mirror Online: A new study has claimed e-cigarettes are dangerous to health
    The Sun: E-cigarettes damage key blood vessels, say experts
    The Daily Mail: Researchers suggest e-cigarettes damage blood vessels and raise risk of disease

    Source: The Daily Telegraph 30 August 2016

  • Research suggests brain’s nicotine receptors may be target for Alzheimer’s treatment

    A new study, published in the journal Neurobiology of Aging, has found that while nicotine is not a suitable substance for Alzheimer’s treatment, blocking receptors in the brain showed a benefit to memory in experiments with mice.

    Nicotine has been shown in previous studies to benefit memory, though the downside of the substance – addiction, early aging and other negative effects on the body – outweigh potential benefits of consumption, researchers have suggested.

    Access full research here.

    Source: UPI 29 August 2016

  • Research: Transplant recipients who resume smoking have shorter survival

    For recipients of an organ transplant, smoking is even more dangerous than for the rest of the population, a recent analysis shows.

    The review of studies on solid organ transplant patients found that those who resumed smoking after a transplant were 40% more likely than others to develop new heart disease, 2.58 times more likely to develop a malignancy other than skin cancer and 1.74 times more likely to die during the follow-up period than non-smoker patients.
    Access full research here.

    Source: Reuters 29 August 2016

  • Costa Rica: Government welcomes needs assessment on tobacco control measures

    At the request of the Costa Rican government, an international team of six experts will be working with the Ministry of Health this week to assess how Costa Rica is progressing in the implementation of the UN tobacco control treaty. The aim is to identify possible barriers and together draft recommendations on how to progress further.

    Costa Rica is a party to the World Health Organisation Framework Convention on Tobacco Control, which obliges all parties to put measures in place that have proven to reduce tobacco consumption, such as banning advertising and promotion of tobacco products, creating smoke free environments and combating the illicit trade in tobacco, among other measures.

    Source: World Health Organisation 29 August 2016

  • Japan: Big Tobacco introduces new vaping products as cigarette alternatives

    Philip Morris International Inc. and Japan Tobacco Inc. have introduced products that are heated – not burned – in battery-charged devices, seeking to appeal to smokers who want their nicotine fix without the usual smell and smoke.

    The approach avoids the part of smoking that involves setting tobacco on fire and inhaling the smoky fumes, as demand for the cigarette alternatives grows faster than manufacturers had anticipated.

    “Our goal for Japan is to switch every consumer we have to this,” said Paul Riley, a spokesman for Philip Morris International. “The biggest thing is we know that smoking kills. If we’ve got an alternative to that, that’s a pretty good reason to switch.”

    Source: Intellasia East Asia News 30 August 2016

  • South Korea: Philip Morris, British American Tobacco under investigation over alleged tax evasion

    South Korean tax authorities are investigating foreign tobacco companies over suspicions that they evaded taxes on huge profits from a tobacco price hike last year..

    Citing the need to discourage smoking, South Korea marked up taxes levied on cigarettes by 2,000 won ($1.79) in January last year, raising the price to 4,500 won per pack.

    The National Tax Service investigators suspect that some tobacco companies, aware of the expected price hike beforehand, pocketed “excessive” profits by stocking up on products and selling them after the tax increase.

    Source: The Korea Times 30 August 2016