ASH Daily News for 3 May 2019



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UK

  • Study: Quitting smoking is associated with lower risk of bladder cancer in postmenopausal women
  • Pembroke Dock Community School helps parents quit smoking

International

  • USA: CVS first major brand to refuse to work with tobacco linked PR agencies

Link of the Week

  • New Cochrane review: Telephone counselling for smoking cessation

 

UK

Study: Quitting smoking is associated with lower risk of bladder cancer in postmenopausal women

A study of postmenopausal women indicated that quitting smoking was associated with significantly reduced risk of bladder cancer, for which smoking is a well-established risk factor. Although bladder cancer is an uncommon type of cancer it is the most common in the urinary system, with a high recurrence rate and high mortality rate. It is more common in men, but women have worse health outcomes when diagnosed at similar stages.

This study has found that among postmenopausal women, stopping smoking is associated with a reduced risk of bladder cancer. The steepest reduction occurs in the first 10 years after quitting (25%). The risk continued to reduce after this for up to 30 years. However, at 30 years, this risk for ex smokers was still higher than never smokers.

Li Yueyao, author of the study said: “Our study emphasises the importance of primary prevention (by not beginning to smoke) and secondary prevention (through smoking cessation) in the prevention of bladder cancer among postmenopausal women”.

Li added: “Current smokers should be advised to quit smoking in order to reduce the risk of bladder cancer”.

Source: EurekAlert!, 1 May 2019

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Pembroke Dock Community School helps parents quit smoking

Pembroke Dock Community school in Wales has started holding smoking cessation sessions with Hywel Dda’s Help Me Quit team (HMQ) and the local community pharmacy. The school, where around two-thirds of children live with a smoker, decided to step in and help offer support to parents who want to quit but find it challenging to get to stop smoking clinics.

Suzanne Cass, CEO of ASH Wales, praised the innovative nature of the scheme but said more needs to be done across Wales to make stop smoking services more accessible to smokers.

Source: Western Telegraph, 3 May 2019

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International

USA: CVS first major brand to refuse to work with tobacco linked PR agencies

Retail pharmacy CVS has announced that it will no longer work with marketing or public relations agencies that have ties to the tobacco industry. It is the first major brand in the USA to join the Quit Big Tobacco campaign – a campaign by public health body Vital Strategies.

More than 200 smaller organisations have already signed the Quit Big Tobacco pledge, committing to work solely with tobacco-free agencies.

Norman de Greve, chief marketing officer for CVS Health, said: “Big tobacco is increasingly using new channels to directly target our youth – including leveraging social media and influencers. We unequivocally take the Quit Big Tobacco pledge, meaning we will not work with any marketing and public relations agencies that have ties with the tobacco industry, and we urge other companies to join us in this critically important fight.”

Source: The Drum, 01 May 2019

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Link of the week

New Cochrane review: Telephone counselling for smoking cessation

A new Cochrane Review has been published on ‘Telephone counselling for smoking cessation’. Telephone services can provide information and support for smokers and counselling can be provided proactively or offered reactively to callers to smoking cessation helplines.

Key results:

• In people who had called helplines, providing additional telephone counselling increased their chances of stopping smoking from 7% to 10%.
• In people who had not called a helpline, but received telephone calls from counsellors or other healthcare providers, their chances of stopping smoking increased from 11% to 14%
• In studies which directly compared more versus fewer calls, people who were offered more calls (three to five) tended to be more likely to quit than those who received only one call.
• Telephone counselling appears to increase the chances of stopping smoking, whether or not people are motivated to quit or are receiving other stop‐smoking support.

Certainty of evidence:

The overall certainty of the evidence was moderate, meaning that further research is likely to have an important impact on our conclusions.

See Review