ASH Daily news for 29 January 2015



HEADLINES

  • Smoking is the main cause of increased risk of heart attack in people with HIV
  • Bristol: Young people protest outside Imperial Tobacco meeting
  • Glasgow: Campaign to cut smoking
  • Birmingham: One million illicit cigarettes seized in raids
  • India: Drop in cancer cases caused by tobacco
  • Parliamentary Questions

    Smoking is the main cause of increased risk of heart attack in people with HIV

    Danish data published in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases suggests that smoking contributes to the increased number of heart attacks observed in people living with HIV.

    The study found that current smokers living with HIV had an almost three-fold increased risk of heart attack, compared to smokers in the general population of the same age and gender.

    Source
    Clinical Infectious Diseases: Myocardial infarction among Danish HIV-infected individuals: Population attributable fractions associated with smoking

    Source: Aidsmap, 28 January 2015
    Link: http://bit.ly/1v49e1g

    Bristol: Young people protest outside Imperial Tobacco meeting

    Yesterday a group of around 25 young people staged a demonstration outside the Imperial Tobacco AGM to protest about the firm’s trade in general and a deal they claim it has struck with the government in Laos to reduce tax on tobacco products, something the firm refutes.

    Daniella Radice, Bristol’s assistant mayor for neighbourhoods, joined the protest outside the Bristol City Centre Marriott Hotel. She said: “Smoking kills, it’s that simple. As we become more and more aware of the dangers and put in more controls in this country Imperial Tobacco is searching for profits overseas.

    “I am looking forward to the new regulations on plain packaging and outlawing smoking in cars with children which will help dissuade people from smoking in this country.”

    Source: Bristol, 28 January 2015
    Link: http://bit.ly/1wDkVWr

    Glasgow: Campaign to cut smoking

    Glasgow city council and health chiefs have launched a two year programme to cut the number of people in Glasgow who smoke. The campaign will focus on some of the most vulnerable people in the city, including young people in care, the prison population and people living in deprived communities.

    Emma Gillan, the city council’s health inequalities spokeswoman, said that whilst a there had been significant progress in reducing the harm caused by tobacco, differences in smoking prevalence between the most and least deprived communities contributed to the levels of health inequality in Glasgow.

    Source: Evening Times, 29 January 2015
    Link: http://bit.ly/1ErxsoR

    Birmingham: One million illicit cigarettes seized in raids

    More than a million illicit cigarettes have been seized by HM Revenue and Customs officers,
    Birmingham City Council’s trading standards teams and the UK Border Force in raids on 22 shops and 17 self-storage units last week.

    Councillor Barbara Dring, Chair of Birmingham City Council’s Licensing and Public Protection Committee said: “Those involved in dealing in illegal tobacco may be encouraging people, including children to smoke by providing a cheap source.

    She added: “This activity also brings crime into our neighbourhoods, which is why it is important to clamp down on it.”

    Source: Birmingham Mail, 28 January 2015
    Link: http://bit.ly/1Djmpuh

    India: Drop in cancer cases caused by tobacco

    The latest report carried out by the Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR) has found that there was a considerable decline in tobacco-related cancers between 1990 and 2004.

    Dr Atul Juneja, ICMR, the main author of the report said: “Intensive health educational campaigns can help in controlling a significant number of cancer cases that are tobacco related”.

    Source: Mail Online, 29 January 2015
    Link: http://dailym.ai/15TXu5d

    Parliamentary Questions

    PQ1 Standardised Packaging
    Source: Hansard (Citation: HC Deb, 27 January 2015, cW)
    Link: http://bit.ly/1Lk7Eg9

    Mark Garnier (Wyre Forest, Conservative)
    To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what plans he has to revise the impact assessment for the proposed introduction of standardised packaging of tobacco in response to the analysis of that impact assessment by the Regulatory Policy Committee; and what plans he has to commission research to support such a revision.

    Mark Garnier (Wyre Forest, Conservative)
    To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what steps he plans to take in response to the request of the Regulatory Policy Committee that compensation be included as a transition cost in a revised impact assessment of the proposed introduction of standardised packaging.

    Jane Ellison (The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Health; Battersea, Conservative)
    A final impact assessment, reflecting available evidence and the summary report of consultation responses will be published in due course.

     

    PQ2: Standardised Packaging
    Source: Hansard (Citation: HC Deb, 27 January 2015, cW)
    http://bit.ly/1Hibrv7

    Mark Garnier (Wyre Forest, Conservative)
    To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what plans he has to commission or conduct research on the potential cost of compensation to the intellectual property sector for the proposed introduction of standardised packaging of tobacco.

    Jane Ellison (The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Health; Battersea, Conservative)
    The Government has carefully considered all issues relevant to the introduction of standardised packaging of tobacco products, including legal aspects.

    Source:
    Link: