ASH Daily news for 28 October 2015



HEADLINES

  • Quitting smoking could lift 59,000 North East people out of poverty
  • Milton Keynes: Woman must pay £1,000 in penalties for dropping a cigarette butt
  • British American Tobacco revenue hurt by weak currencies
  • EUBAM’s Task Force Tobacco Group meeting discusses plans for fighting tobacco smuggling
  • US: Government bans e-cigarettes in airline passengers’ checked bags
  • Canada: Court orders tobacco companies to set aside almost C$1bn
  • South Korea: JTI, BAT defy state anti-smoking drive
  • Australia: Man aggressively confronts woman for smoking in smokefree zone

    Quitting smoking could lift 59,000 North East people out of poverty

    Around 59,000 people living in the North East would be lifted out of poverty if they quit smoking new figures show.

    The research published today by ASH shows that of the 302,000 households in the North East that include an adult smoker 102,000 are below the poverty line.

    An estimated 34,000 households could be lifted out of poverty if they quit smoking.

    These households comprise around 59,000 people including 18,000 children and 8,842 pensioners. On average households that include a smoker spend £2,158 a year on tobacco.

    [note: Figures are available for all the regions of England including at local authority or county level. see Health Inequalities Resource Pack]

    Source: Chronicle Live – 28 October 2015
    Link: http://bit.ly/1PU0xhD

    Milton Keynes: Woman must pay £1,000 in penalties for dropping a cigarette butt

    A smoker who dropped her cigarette butt on the floor has been ordered to pay nearly £1,000 by Milton Keynes magistrates.

    Tiffany Cobb was convicted in her absence of littering and ordered to pay a fine of £220 under the Environmental Protection Act 1990. She was also ordered to pay MK Councils’ legal and investigation costs of £575.70, a £22 victim surcharge and the Criminal Courts Charge of £150.

    Source: Milton Keynes Citizen – 27 October 2015
    Link: http://bit.ly/1PU0NwR

  • British American Tobacco revenue hurt by weak currencies

    British American Tobacco , the world’s No. 2 cigarette company, reported a 6.5% decline in revenue for the first nine months of the year, as a result of currency fluctuations and declines in smoking rates.

    The cigarette maker is, like its peers, grappling with falling sales in many markets due to increasing regulation, higher taxes, economic weakness and growing health consciousness.

    “The trading environment remains challenging due to the slower-than-expected recovery in the global economy, continued pressure on consumer disposable income worldwide and significant currency headwinds,” the company said in a statement.

    Excluding the currency impact, BAT said year-to-date revenue to 30 September rose 4.2%, due to price increases. Volume, or the amount of tobacco sold, fell 1.8%.

    Source: LSE – 28 October 2015
    Link: http://bit.ly/1PU0YZ5

    EUBAM’s Task Force Tobacco Group meeting discusses plans for fighting tobacco smuggling

    Representatives of law enforcement agencies in Moldova, Ukraine, Hungary, Poland, Romania, Slovakia and large cigarette firms such as British American Tobacco, Japan Tobacco International, Imperial Tobacco and Philip Morris, as well as officials from EU agencies Europol, OLAF and SELEC, took part in the EUBAM’s (EU Border Assistance Mission to Moldova and Ukraine) Task Force Tobacco Group meeting in Chisinau last week.

    Customs representatives presented the latest findings on cigarette smuggling and cases involving large-scale seizures of tobacco products originating in Moldova and Ukraine.

    Discussions also addressed the strategic aspects of counteracting cigarette smuggling in the region, including the introduction of the Moldovan and Ukrainian national strategies to step up the fight against illicit trade in tobacco products.

    Source: ENPI-Info – 26 October 2015
    Link: http://bit.ly/1PU1d6v

    US: Government bans e-cigarettes in airline passengers’ checked bags

    A new federal rule forbids airline passengers from packing electronic cigarettes or other battery-operated electronic smoking devices in their checked bags to protect against in-flight fires.

    The rule still allows e-cigarettes in carry-on bags, but passengers cannot recharge the devices while on the plane.

    The Department of Transportation said there have been at least 26 incidents since 2009 in which e-cigarettes that have caused explosions or fires, including several in which the devices were packed in luggage. Usually, they have been accidentally left on or the battery short-circuits.

    Source: CBS News – 26 October 2015
    Link: http://cbsn.ws/1PU1lD6

    Canada: Court orders tobacco companies to set aside almost C$1bn

    A Canadian appeal court has ordered two major tobacco companies to set aside a combined C$984 million ($742 million) while they challenge billions of dollars in damages awarded to smokers in the province of Quebec.

    The more than C$15 billion in damages awarded in June, if upheld in an appeal of two class-action lawsuits, would compensate some 100,000 Quebec smokers and ex-smokers who allege the companies knew since the 1950s that their product was causing cancer and other illnesses and failed to warn consumers adequately.

    Imperial Tobacco Canada Ltd – a subsidiary of British American Tobacco Plc – must put aside C$758 million, and Rothmans, Benson & Hedges Inc – a subsidiary of Philip Morris International – must deposit C$226 million, the Quebec Court of Appeal said.

    Source: Reuters – 17 October 2015
    Link: http://bit.ly/1PU1tm5

    South Korea: JTI, BAT defy state anti-smoking drive

    Two foreign tobacco makers ― Japan Tobacco International (JTI) and British American Tobacco (BAT) ― have caused a controversy after launching new products available at prices that are nearly two thirds of the average cigarette price of 4,500 won per pack.

    The companies made the prices possible by reducing the number of cigarettes in a pack. A pack normally contains 20 cigarettes. But JTI’s Camel, which hit the market this week, contains 14 and the price was lowered to 2,500 won. BAT adopted a similar scheme in April, releasing two kinds of Dunhill containing 14 cigarettes a pack, which sell for 3,000 won.

    Source: Korea Times – 27 October 2015
    Link: http://bit.ly/1PU1DK4

    Australia: Man aggressively confronts woman for smoking in smokefree zone

    A smoker was suddenly confronted by a man shouting at her to put her cigarette out as she strolled through Sydney’s Martin Place on Wednesday morning.

    On 11 May, the City of Sydney Council introduced a 12-month trial smoking ban at that location after a survey of smokers and non-smokers said Martin Place was a less attractive place because of passive smoke.

    Offenders may be issued fines of up to $550. Individuals can also be fined $80 for discarding an unlit or extinguished cigarette – $200 if it is still alight.

    But the woman’s accent sounded French and she may not have been aware that smoking was now prohibited in the area.

    Source: Daily Mail – 28 October 2015
    Link: http://dailym.ai/1HakE3J