ASH Daily News for 27 March 2017



  • Yorkshire: Report highlights success of tobacco control strategy
  • Scarborough: Retailer prosecuted for selling e-cigarette to teenager
  • New Zealand: Philip Morris’ ‘Heat not burn’ tobacco sales under scrutiny
  • Dutch cancer charity joins lawsuit against big tobacco over holes in filters
  • Botswana: Gov’t to strengthen tobacco control laws
  • Inside Big Tobacco’s Academy of Lies, the inventor of ‘alternative facts’
  • What happens when you put disturbing labels on cigarette packs
  • Chart: Why smoking is still so widespread

Yorkshire: Report highlights success of tobacco control strategy

North Yorkshire County Council and its partners have published a report which highlights the successes of the first year of the county’s tobacco control strategy and outlines key actions for the next 12 months.

Since the strategy was launched, a range of programmes have been delivered by the organisations that form the North Yorkshire tobacco control partnership, including a new council-funded stop smoking service.

Source: NE Connected – 24 March 2017
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Scarborough: Retailer prosecuted for selling e-cigarette to teenager

A Scarborough retailer has been prosecuted for selling an e-cigarette to a teenager. Mr Steven Purves, of Vaporised, Huntriss Row, was fined £440 at Scarborough Magistrates Court on March 10 for selling an e-cigarette to a 14-year-old.

North Yorkshire County Council Trading Standards department has reported an increase in complaints relating to the sale of e-cigarettes and nicotine inhaling products to under-18s.

Source: Scarborough News – 24 March 2017
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New Zealand: Philip Morris’ ‘Heat not burn’ tobacco sales under scrutiny

Multi-national tobacco giant Philip Morris is giving smokers private demonstrations of its “heat not burn” electronic devices, and insists it is not breaking the law.

Through an invitation-only website, the tobacco company is marketing its Iqos smokeless electronic devices.

But tobacco sales are tightly regulated, and Philip Morris’ sales strategy has caught the attention of the Ministry of Health.

“The ministry is currently investigating the promotion and sale of the product,” said the ministry’s chief legal officer Phil Knipe.

The ministry’s website says “heat not burn” products are considered tobacco products for oral use under the Smoke-free Environments Act 1990.

Source: Stuff.co.nz – 27 March 2017
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Dutch cancer charity joins lawsuit against big tobacco over holes in filters

Cancer charity KWF Kankerbestrijding has made a formal complaint against four tobacco companies, accusing them of grievous bodily harm and fraud.

The organisation says the tobacco firms have misled smokers about the damaging side effects of their addiction, particularly by using cigarettes that give false readings in test results through the use of tiny ventilation holes in filters.

The KWF says cigarette firms have done this deliberately to skew the results of the tests. The organisation is now joining forces with a law suit brought by smoker Anne Marie van Veen.

Source: Dutch News – 24 March 2017
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Botswana: Gov’t to strengthen tobacco control laws

A new tobacco control law, drafted to be compliant with the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) will be tabled in Parliament during the July sitting, the deputy permanent secretary at the Botswana Ministry of Health and Wellness has announced.

Source: Mmegi – 24 March 2017
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Inside Big Tobacco’s Academy of Lies, the inventor of ‘alternative facts’

The Daily Beast explores the tobacco industry’s tactics and looks at the parallel with climate change.

Source: Daily Best – 25 March 2017
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What happens when you put disturbing labels on cigarette packs

Attn looks at the impact of graphic warnings and standardised packaging legislation in Australia.

Source: Attn – 24 March 2017
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Chart: Why smoking is still so widespread

The Economist has published a chart showing the changes in anti-smoking measures and smoking prevalence in 126 countries.

Source: The Economist – 24 March 2017
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