ASH Daily News for 27 July 2015



HEADLINES

  • Whitehall ‘knew about health risks’ to prison wardens
  • Southern Rail bans use of electronic cigarettes
  • Nottingham: Smoking ban in play areas
  • Ireland: Electronic cigarette sellers anger at vaping adverts ban
  • China catches up with the electronic cigarette habit
  • Should a hunger charity accept support from a tobacco company?

    Whitehall ‘knew about health risks’ to prison wardens

    Reports based on air-quality tests carried out in several prisons suggest that the Ministry of Justice has been aware of the health risks posed to prison staff exposed to very high levels of secondhand smoke for eight years. The reports found secondhand smoke levels exceeded the US classification for “unhealthy” for short periods of time and levels in one prison were similar to those experienced by bar staff before the smoking ban.

    Sean Humber, a lawyer with Leigh Day solicitors, said: “The results suggest that non-smoking prisoners and prison staff may very well be being exposed to unhealthy levels of cigarette smoke. This must call into question the lawfulness of continuing to force non-smoking prisoners to share cells with smokers. It may also show that the existing ban on smoking in the communal areas of prisons, such as landings, is simply not being enforced.”

    The Prison Officers Association’s national executive committee said it has been pushing for a ban since legislation was introduced in 2007 but that the National Offender Management Service had blocked the measure over fears of how prisoners would react.

    Deborah Arnott, chief executive of charity Action on Smoking and Health, said: “Prisons all around the world have gone smoke-free with few problems and, in the UK, all high-security psychiatric facilities have already gone smoke-free, as have prisons in the Isle of Man and Guernsey, without any trouble.”

    Source: The Observer, 26 July 2015
    Link: http://bit.ly/1Ktn8Ad

    Southern Rail bans use of electronic cigarettes

    The Southern Rail ban on electronic cigarette use at its stations and on its trains began on Sunday. The policy brings the train company’s rules in line with those of Thameslink and Great Northern. The company says the ban has been put in place to make travelling more pleasant for passengers.

    Source: Eagle Radio News, 27 July 2015
    Link: http://bit.ly/1esWQ2N

    Nottingham: Smoking ban in play areas

    A voluntary smoking ban has been launched in play areas by Newark and Sherwood District Council. It is hoped it will lead to outdoor public places becoming smoke-free. The scheme will rely on the goodwill of people using parks and will be supported by signs. Local schools have also designed posters to encourage the ban.

    Source: Nottingham Post, 24 July 2015
    Link: http://bit.ly/1fz7rdm

    Ireland: Electronic cigarette sellers anger at vaping adverts ban

    Electronic cigarette retailers have voiced their anger after the Advertising Standards Authority for Ireland outlined plans to restrict promotion of the devices on social media, television and radio from September. Currently, electronic cigarettes can be advertised in print media and online in Ireland.

    Joe Dunne, Company Director for VIP Electronic Cigarettes said: “Advertising should be allowed because it’s a product that reduces the harm caused to smokers. An advert should be something appealing and slick; it needs a bit of sexiness because it’s not an advert for foot cream.”

    Source: The Sunday Times (£), 26 July 2015
    Link: http://thetim.es/1gfwOSz

    China catches up with the electronic cigarette habit

    The Times explores the rise of electronic cigarettes in China.

    Source: The Times (£), 27 July 2015
    Link: http://thetim.es/1Ipo5HN

    Should a hunger charity accept support from a tobacco company?

    In a BMJ blog, Professor Simon Chapman argues that tobacco company British American Tobacco’s support for the Million Meal Challenge being run by charity Stop Hunger Now Southern Africa is inappropriate given the catastrophic burden tobacco use places on poor populations.

    Professor Chapman states: “Supporting charities in doing their life-saving, vital work provides inviolate “air cover” from criticism for companies wanting to distract public attention from their core business.”

    Source: BMJ Blogs, 27 July 2015
    Link: http://bit.ly/1Msg7PN