ASH Daily News for 26 April 2019



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UK

  • Secondhand smoke main cause of lung cancer among non-smokers in the UK
  • Sniffer dog Pip uncovers £12,000 stash of illicit tobacco in Preston and Burnley
  • Oldham shisha bar fined after breach of smokefree laws

International

  • Japanese university says it won’t hire teachers who smoke

Campaigns

  • ASH #ActOnTobacco Campaign

Link of the week

  • Statistics on NHS Stop Smoking Services in England: April 2018 – December 2018

 

UK

Secondhand smoke main cause of lung cancer among non-smokers in the UK

Smoking remains the largest modifiable risk factor for lung cancer in the UK, accounting for 86% of lung cancers and about 30,000 deaths a year, yet it is estimated that nearly 6000 people who have never smoked die of lung cancer every year in the UK.

Experts, writing in The Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine, cite secondhand smoke and air pollution as likely causes. Breathing in secondhand smoke – for example being brought up in a home where someone smokes – is the single biggest risk factor for a non-smokers getting lung cancer, according to the experts, accounting for 15% of the 6,000 cases.

“If considered as a separate entity, lung cancer in never-smokers is the eighth most common cause of cancer-related death in the UK and the seventh most prevalent cancer in the world,” the authors state.

Source: The Guardian, 26 April 2019

See also: The Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine –
Lung cancer in never-smokers: a hidden disease

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Sniffer dog Pip uncovers £12,000 stash of illicit tobacco in Preston and Burnley

A sniffer dog has helped Trading Standards uncover a hidden stash of illicit tobacco worth £12,000 at two shops in Preston and Burnley.

Both shops had sold illicit tobacco during test purchasing operations and police had received a stream of intelligence to support their suspicions. Sniffer dog, Pip, discovered large amounts of illicit tobacco in a flat above one of the shops, and under a manhole cover in the backyard of the other.

Around 200,000 illicit cigarettes and around 40kg of tobacco has been confiscated from Lancashire traders in 50 separate seizures in the last 12 months. The Council’s crackdown on illicit tobacco has led to 17 criminal convictions in that same period.

Source: Lancashire Post, 25 April 2019

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Oldham shisha bar fined after breach of smokefree laws

A shisha bar in Oldham has been successfully prosecuted for the second time after Environmental Health Officers found smokefree laws were being ignored. During a visit to the premises in January 2019, customers were found to be smoking shisha pipes in an enclosed space.

Under the Smoke Free Regulations 2007, following the Health Act 2006, it is illegal to smoke any tobacco product, including shisha, in public spaces which are enclosed or substantially enclosed (where less than 50% of the wall space is open, excluding windows and doors).

Fines in excess of £7,000 were given to the business and its manager. Helen Lockwood, Deputy Chief Executive of Oldham Council, said: “We’d never encourage anyone to smoke as it can cause serious illness. However, any shisha bars in the borough must operate within the law and premises can expect regular visits. If they don’t comply then we will take action.”

Source: About Manchester, 26 April 2019

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International

Japanese university says it won’t hire teachers who smoke

A university in Japan says it has stopped hiring faculty members who smoke unless they promise to quit. Nagasaki University said the policy, announced last week, was part of its larger plan to discourage smoking. Last year, the university announced it would ban smoking on campus starting in August 2019, and said it planned to ban the possession of items related to smoking starting in April 2020.

“Our job as a university is to nurture human resources, and we feel obliged to discourage people against smoking,” Shigeru Kono, president of the university, said last week.

In the run-up to the 2020 Olympic Games hosted in Tokyo a number of smokefree measures are being implemented in Japan. The International Olympic Committee requires a smokefree environment for the Games, and the city has complied with a smoking ban at indoor and outdoor Olympic venues. Tokyo has also passed a smoking ban at bars and restaurants, set to take effect a few months before the Olympics begin. Last year, the government passed a nationwide smoking ban in public places, but resistance from the restaurant industry led to 55% of eating establishments being exempted.

Source: The New York Times, 25 April 2019

See also: The Japan Times – Japan’s watered-down smoking ban clears Diet

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Campaigns

ASH #ActOnTobacco Campaign

Today is the third day of a week long campaign by ASH and our partners, highlighting how Big Tobacco’s big profits continue to be built on a lethal trade and shady dealings.

Bob Blackman MP, Chair of the All Party Parliamentary Group on Smoking and Health, this month introduced a Ten Minute Rule Bill in Parliament to require the collection and publication of existing tobacco industry data on its sales and marketing activity, including profits, taxes paid, product prices, marketing and research spending. In today’s blog Bob Blackman looks at why this is needed.

The campaign is running to coincide with the British American Tobacco (BAT) and Philip Morris International (PMI) AGMs. BAT’s AGM took place on 25th April and PMI’s AGM will take place 1st May.

Read Blog

 

Link of the week

Statistics on NHS Stop Smoking Services in England: April 2018 – December 2018

The latest quarterly NHS Digital data on Stop Smoking Services in England was published yesterday, 25th April 2019.

Key facts from the latest release include:
• 166,880 people set a quit date and at the 4 week follow-up 86,167 people (52%) had successfully quit (self-reported)
• Quitting success (self-reported) increased with age, from 35% of those aged under 18, to 57% of those aged 60 and over.
• Yorkshire and the Humber had the highest proportion of successful quitters (61%), whilst the South West had the lowest proportion (44%).
• 46% of the pregnant women who set a quit date successfully quit.

See Data