ASH Daily News for 24 May 2018



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UK

  • Essex: Elderly homeowner escapes fire caused by discarded cigarette

International

  • Study finds cigarette smoke directly damages muscles in the body
  • USA: Money motivates smokers to quit
  • USA: Scientists warn of the dangers of cinnamon flavoured e-cigarette liquid

 

UK

Essex: Elderly homeowner escapes fire caused by discarded cigarette

Firefighters were called to a house fire on Wednesday morning after an elderly occupant was awoken by the sound of burning, they were able to evacuate with the help of neighbours.

An investigation found that the fire had been caused accidentally by a discarded cigarette, which had ignited the shed in the property’s back garden. The fire had then spread to the adjacent back wall of the home and quickly reached the upstairs.

This is the second time in three days that firefighters have attended a serious fire at a domestic property caused by inappropriately discarded cigarettes.

Source: The Maldon Standard, 23 May 2018

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International

Study finds cigarette smoke directly damages muscles in the body

We already know that smoking restricts a person’s ability to exercise because it makes their muscles weaker. It is widely believed this muscle weakness is because the lungs become inflamed and eventually destroyed by habitual smoking, therefore limiting activity and exercise.

Research shows that components in cigarette smoke also directly damage your muscles. The research, published in The Journal of Physiology, indicates that smoking decreases the number of small blood vessels that bring oxygen and nutrients to muscles in the legs.

Reducing the amount of oxygen and nutrients muscles can receive can impact metabolism and activity levels, both of which are risk factors for many chronic diseases including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and diabetes.

See also:
The Journal of Physiology: Cigarette smoke directly impairs skeletal muscle function through capillary regression and altered myofiber calcium kinetics in mice

Source: Medical Express, 24 May 2018

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USA: Money motivates smokers to quit

A smoking cessation study published in The New England Journal of Medicine found financial incentives in conjunction with free cessation aids resulted in a higher rate of sustained smoking abstinence than free cessation aids alone.

The study utilised groups of employees, with the most successful being the group that chose the cessation products they wanted plus $600 in an account with the threat that they would lose the money if they didn’t stay smokefree for six months. Their success rate was 12.7% which was better than those who got e-cigarettes or free cessation aids alone.

See also
New England Journal of Medicine: A Pragmatic Trial of E-Cigarettes, Incentives, and Drugs for Smoking Cessation

Source: Reuters, 23 May 2018

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USA: Scientists warn of the dangers of cinnamon flavoured e-cigarette liquid

Cinnamon-flavoured e-cigarettes may damage the lungs, a study has found.

Scientists in the US carried out tests in which they investigated the effects of 7 flavoured nicotinefree e-liquids on primary human alveolar macrophages, neutrophils, and natural killer (NK) cells (airway cells). Cinnamaldehyde-containing e-liquids (cinnamon flavour) had the most immunosuppressive effects across the different end points and cell types examined.

The researchers concluded that cinnamaldehyde has the potential to impair respiratory immune cell function, illustrating an immediate need for further toxicological evaluation of chemical flavouring agents to inform regulation governing their use in e-liquid formulations.

See also The Mirror: Beware the cinnamon e-cig! Scientists warn of the dangers of vaping this particular spice

Source: American Journal of Physiology, 1 August 2017

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Editorial note: The author of the article about Youtube removing e-cigarette content featured in yesterday’s Daily News (23/05/2018), Martin Cullip, is also known as Dick Puddlecote.

See tobacco tactics: http://www.tobaccotactics.org/index.php/Martin_Cullip