ASH Daily news for 19 January 2016



HEADLINES

  • Are adverts for candy-flavoured electronic cigarettes tempting teens to vape?
  • Bid to speed up prison smoking ban
  • NHS trails Africa in efforts to cut stillbirth numbers
  • NHS chief to introduce sugar tax in hospitals to tackle UK obesity crisis
  • Thailand: Tobacco giant Philip Morris faces $2.2 billion Thai tax fine

    Are adverts for candy-flavoured electronic cigarettes tempting teens to vape?

    Following reports that “advertisements for … flavoured e-cigarettes could encourage children to try vaping”, based on research published in the journal of Tobacco Control, NHS Choices notes that the study found adverts for flavoured electronic cigarettes were more appealing compared with those for non-flavoured electronic cigarettes – and children said they’d be more interested in going out and buying them. But whether they would actually do this is another matter. The research has only examined attitudes, not behaviour.

    The research also found adverts for flavoured or non-flavoured electronic cigarettes made no difference to the children’s opinion of whether or not they’d be more likely to try smoking tobacco cigarettes.

    Source
    Tobacco Control: Impact of advertisements promoting candy-like flavoured e-cigarettes on appeal of tobacco smoking among children: an experimental study

    See also
    • ITV News: Ads for sweet-tasting e-cigarettes could ‘encourage kids to start vaping
    • Scotsman: E-cigarette sweet flavours ‘could attract kids to vaping’

    Source: NHS Choices, 18 January 2016
    Link: http://bit.ly/1JW3bCR

    Bid to speed up prison smoking ban

    The Prison Officers Association (POA) is to launch a judicial review against the Prison Service to speed up an outright ban on smoking in prisons.

    Whilst the initial smoke-free policy will be implemented in Welsh prisons this month and at selected English prisons from March, POA general secretary Steve Gillan said: “The ban could be rolled out in two years, three years or 20 years. Air quality controls and medical reports show that prison officers and prisoners could suffer and will suffer ill-health effects.”

    Source: BBC News, 18 January 2016
    Link: http://bbc.in/1Jcemr9

    NHS trails Africa in efforts to cut stillbirth numbers

    A series published in the Lancet shows that Britain trails the world in improving its stillbirth rate. Progress on reducing stillbirths is slower than in Zambia and the Democratic Republic of Congo. Every year almost three in every 1,000 babies in the UK are born dead.

    Jeremy Hunt, the health secretary, has promised to halve stillbirth rates by 2030, with deaths to be investigated more rigorously to highlight where improvements can be made.

    [Editorial note: Smoking is a recognised risk factor for foetal death and early neonatal mortality]

    Source
    Lancet: The silence around stillbirth is unspeakable.

    Source: The Times, 18 January 2016
    Link: http://thetim.es/1lpY2HD

    NHS chief to introduce sugar tax in hospitals to tackle UK obesity crisis

    Simon Stevens, chief executive of NHS England has announced plans to impose a sugar tax in hospitals across England to help tackle the “national sugar high” increasingly ruining people’s health.

    The move will make the NHS the first public body in the UK to bring in a sugar tax, and it will use the expected proceeds of £20m-£40m a year to improve the health of its own 1.3 million workers.

    Mr Stevens said: “Because of the role that the NHS occupies in national life, all of us working in the NHS have a responsibility not just to support those who look after patients but also to draw attention to and make the case for some of the wider changes that will actually improve the health of this country.”

    Source: The Guardian, 17 January 2016
    Link: http://bit.ly/1V04RvL

    Thailand: Tobacco giant Philip Morris faces $2.2 billion Thai tax fine

    Philip Morris is facing a $2.2 billion fine if found guilty of avoiding tax on cigarette imports to Thailand, prosecutors said on Tuesday.

    The allegations are part of a long running tax dispute between the country and Philip Morris (Thailand), which has also clashed with authorities over plans to increase the size of health warnings on cigarette packets.

    Source: Yahoo, 19 January 2016
    Link: http://yhoo.it/1nhD9QS