ASH Daily News for 18 November 2016



  • Smoking in Exeter prison
  • What happens to your body 24 hours after quitting smoking?
  • USA:  Could legalising cannabis diminish California’s gains against Smoking?
  • Smoking may block some of the benefits of kidney disease medications
  • Impact of very low nicotine content cigarettes on weight gain

Smoking in Exeter prison

There have been reports of some prisoners flouting the smoking ban in Exeter prison, one of the first of the prisons in England to implement the no-smoking rule.

Officers said most of the inmates were either vaping with inhalers provided by family and friends or using nicotine replacement therapy to quit the habit.

Prison officers said the smoking ban had made the prison a more pleasant place to work. However, they said there are some hardened smokers who still craved a “burn” and there was sometimes a “whiff” of burning tea leaves on the wings.

The Prison Service said prisoners caught smoking will face additional punishment and any materials confiscated.

Source: Express & Echo, 17 November 2016

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What happens to your body 24 hours after quitting smoking?

The Express reviews the immediate health benefits of stopping smoking.

Sarah Williams, Director of Policy at ASH said: “Stopping smoking is always good for your health and it’s never too late to try.  It can be hard to stop smoking, but there are people who can help. Ask your doctor about the best ways to quit and visit a stop smoking service if you can.”

Source: The Daily Express – 17 November 2016
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USA:  Could legalising cannabis diminish California’s gains against smoking?

California’s decision to legalise marijuana was touted as a victory for those who had argued that the state needed a system to decriminalise, regulate and tax it.

But health researchers are concerned that unless the state proceeds carefully, the legalisation of marijuana for recreational use could roll back some of the gains California has made in reducing the use of tobacco.

“There is a concern that there could be a potential renormalization of smoking,” said Michael Ong, associate professor at UCLA’s David Geffen School of Medicine.

Ong said it will depend on how the initiative is implemented, whether officials follow through on the regulation, and how involved public health officials are with it. “It will be important to make sure that we don’t have a setback in terms of what we have done for clean air in California … and what we have done to reduce tobacco’s harms,” he said.

Source: California Healthline – 11 November 2016
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Smoking may block some of the benefits of kidney disease medications

A new study suggests that cigarette smoking partially negates the kidney-protective effects of medications taken by patients with early chronic kidney disease (CKD), possibly by inducing higher kidney levels of oxidative stress.

The study included 108 smoking and 108 nonsmoking patients with early CKD who were taking angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) drugs, which slow kidney function decline. All smokers underwent a smoking cessation intervention. Non-smokers (n = 108), continued smokers (n = 83), and quitters (n = 25) were followed 5 years after starting ACE inhibition.

Nonsmokers and smokers who successfully quit had slower worsening of their kidney function than those who were unsuccessful at quitting. In addition, continued smoking prevented the typical decrease in protein excretion in the urine that is indicative of kidney protection when patients are taking ACEI drugs. This appeared to be due to oxidative stress induced by cigarette smoking.

The findings will be presented at the ASN Kidney Week 2016 conference.

Source: Medical Xpress – 17 November 2016
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Impact of very low nicotine content cigarettes on weight gain

A US study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of very low nicotine content cigarettes.

Weight gain was evaluated from a double-blind, parallel, randomised clinical trial of 839 participants assigned to smoke 1 of 6 investigational cigarettes with nicotine content ranging from 0.4 to 15.8 mg/g or their own usual brand for 6 weeks.

There were no significant differences in weight gain when comparing the reduced nicotine conditions with the 15.8 mg/g control group across all treatment groups and weeks. However, weight gain at week 6 was negatively correlated with nicotine exposure in the 2 lowest nicotine content cigarette conditions. Within the 2 lowest nicotine content cigarette conditions, male and female smokers biochemically verified to be compliant on study product gained significantly more weight than non-compliant smokers and control groups.

Source: BMJ – 17 November 2016
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