ASH Daily news for 17 April 2015



HEADLINES

  • US: E-cigarettes: teens smoking less but vaping on the increase – CDC report
  • E-cigarettes make quitting smoking harder, study claims
  • Liverpool: Firefighters back smoking awareness month
  • Stockport: Secondhand smoke campaign launched
  • Ireland: ‘Trade deal could help Big Tobacco in legal battles’: IMO
  • India: Canadian Cancer Soc. urges PM to implement 85% pictorial warnings on tobacco products
  • Bangladesh: New law bans smoking even in private offices
  • Kenya: BAT Challenges New Cigarette Regulations on Packaging From Ministry of Health
  • US: Ban hazardous child labor in tobacco farming
  • China: Vote over future of smoking goes to a show of hands

    US: E-cigarettes: teens smoking less but vaping on the increase – CDC report

    E-cigarette use (defined as use within the past 30 days) among high school students increased almost tenfold from 2011-2014, but the proportion of high schoolers who reported smoking cigarettes fell steeply from 15.8% to 9.2% over the same period, according to a new study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

    The study, based on tens of thousands of responses to federally administered National Youth Tobacco Surveys, found that tobacco use among US middle school (grades 6-8) and high school (grades 9-12) students fell off for most products – cigarettes, cigars, pipes and smokeless tobacco – in the years under study.

    Two products recorded steady gains in popularity, however – hookahs and e-cigarettes.

    See also:
    – E-cig use soared, cigarette use fell among U.S. youth in 2014-CDC, Reuters
    – High school, middle school kids now use more e-cigs than tobacco: CDC, Washington Post
    – Sharp Uptick in Youth E-Cigarette Use an Alarming Trend, Says American Heart Association, Health Canal
    – Rise in teen use of e-cigarettes prompts concerns from Connecticut’s federal lawmakers, New Haven Register
    – Study: High school smoking fell as e-cigarette use boomed, Daily Mail
    – E-cigarette use triples in US teens, Mail Online/AFP

    Source: The Guardian – 16 April 2015
    Link: http://bit.ly/1DP7Zop

    E-cigarettes make quitting smoking harder, study claims

    Smokers hoping to quit using e-cigarettes may find it harder than they think, claim US researchers.

    They found smokers who used e-cigarettes were less likely to decrease cigarette use and to quit smoking compared to smokers who never used e-cigarettes.

    The study was carried out by researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine.

    See also:
    – E-cig fans less likely to quit their habit, The Sun (£)
    – E-cigs DON’T help smokers quit fags – in fact they make it harder to stop, Daily Mirror

    Source: Daily Mail – 16 April 2015
    Link: http://bit.ly/1DP8cIa

    Liverpool: Firefighters back smoking awareness month

    Halton firefighters are backing a smoking awareness campaign which encourages residents to extinguish cigarettes in a bid to prevent fires.

    Cheshire Fire And Rescue Service (CFRS) said that there were 245 smoking-related fire incidents in the county between April 2009 and March 2014.

    Firefighters from across Runcorn and Widnes will be supporting smoking awareness month, which takes place throughout April.

    CFRS statistics show that 21.8% of smoking-related fires start in the living room, while 18.4% begin in the bedroom.

    Source: Liverpool Echo – 17 April 2015
    Link: http://bit.ly/1DP8y1n

    Stockport: Secondhand smoke campaign launched

    Stockport Council and Stockport Homes are backing the latest Public Health England’s campaign to highlight the hidden damage that secondhand smoke in homes and cars can cause to children and babies’ health.

    The campaign follows the government’s decision to end smoking in cars carrying children in England – from 1 October 2015 people failing to comply could face a £50 fixed penalty notice. Residents are being urged to make their home and car smoke free, as secondhand smoke is particularly harmful to children and babies as they breathe more rapidly and have less developed airways.

    Source: Stockport Independent – 16 April 2015
    Link: http://bit.ly/1DP8O0x

    Ireland: ‘Trade deal could help Big Tobacco in legal battles’: IMO

    A proposed trade agreement between the EU and the US could aid tobacco firms in their fight against standard packaging, according to a senior figure in the Irish Medical Organisation.

    Dr Neil Brennan, chair of the IMO International Affairs Committee, said he was concerned that the proposed Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) would set up a transnational arbitration system which would allow tobacco companies to bypass national governments.

    Source: Independent.ie – 17 April 2015
    Link: http://bit.ly/1DP8UFt

    India: Canadian Cancer Soc. urges PM to implement 85% pictorial warnings on tobacco products

    The Canadian Cancer Society and the Heart and Stroke Foundation has written to Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi urging him to implement India’s planned pictorial health warnings covering 85 percent of the front and back of tobacco packages.

    The letter was written to coincide with Modi’s visit to Canada.

    See also:
    – Don’t ignore the deadly anti-smoking sign, The Millennium Post

    Source: The Health Site – 17 April 2015
    Link: http://bit.ly/1DP96Vd

    Bangladesh: New law bans smoking even in private offices

    More than 45 percent of people either smoke or chew tobacco in Bangladesh, making it one of the top five countries in tobacco consumption in the world.

    Anti-tobacco activists say tobacco industry lobbying has delayed adoption of rules for implementing the 2013 amended law by nearly two years.

    The rules have finally been adopted on Mar 12 this year clearing the path for implementing the law that has broadened the definition of public places, increased penalties and introduced pictorial health warning in tobacco packages.

    Source: BD News 24 – 17 April 2015
    Link: http://bit.ly/1DP9p2l

    Kenya: BAT Challenges New Cigarette Regulations on Packaging From Ministry of Health

    BAT has challenged a directive by the Ministry of Health which requires cigarette packages to carry health warnings and pictogrammes on the front and back respectively.

    In an application filed at the High Court yesterday, BAT says the order is unconstitutional.

    The regulations were published by the ministry last year and are expected to come into force on June 5.

    According to the regulations, tobacco manufacturers and importers will have to pay a levy of two per cent of the value of tobacco products manufactured or imported annually as compensatory contribution fund.

    Source: All Africa – 16 April 2015
    Link: http://bit.ly/1DPak2O

    US: Ban hazardous child labor in tobacco farming

    The US Congress should promptly enact legislation introduced on 16 April that would provide needed protection for children working in US tobacco farming, Human Rights Watch said today. Bills were introduced simultaneously in the Senate by Senator Richard Durbin of Illinois and in the House of Representatives by Representative David Cicilline of Rhode Island.

    The legislation would prohibit children under 18 from working in direct contact with tobacco.

    See also: 
    – NGO letter supporting Children Don’t Belong on Tobacco Farms Act, Human Rights Watch press release

    Source: eNews Park Forest – 16 April 2015
    Link: http://bit.ly/1DPaVkX

    China: Vote over future of smoking goes to a show of hands

    In a last-gasp effort to save the lungs of 300 million smokers, China is asking people to vote for their favourite of a series of three government-approved hand gestures that could be used by non-smokers to signal their displeasure at the habit.

    Smoking indoors in public places will be banned outright from June 1, but, in the longer term the hand gestures will, it is hoped, gradually make smoking socially unacceptable.

    The first hand gestures consist in holding one’s hand over one’s nose. The second is a raised palm making a classic “stop” sign, and the third shows both hands made into a letter T, to signify a more polite request to stop.

    An official manning one of the telephone voting lines told The Times that the hand-over-nose gesture had won the most votes so far, but polls conducted on social media suggest that the race is still wide open.

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    Source: The Times – 17 April 2015
    Link: http://thetim.es/1G0g8pw