ASH Daily news for 16 June 2015



HEADLINES

  • Local authority budget cuts will pressurise primary care
  • Study estimates deaths attributable to cigarettes for 12 smoking-related cancers
  • Law Society of Scotland on enforcing smoking ban in cars with children present
  • UN aviation agency bans electronic cigarettes in checked bags
  • Tobacco Manufactures Association says Levy on tobacco industry would put UK’s public services at risk
  • US: Teen smoking dropped after minimum sales age rose
  • Parliamentary Questions

    Local authority budget cuts will pressurise primary care

    Following the government’s announcement that it will cut £200 million from local authority health budgets, impacting services such as school nursing, health visiting, smoking cessation and obesity services, health experts have warned that cuts could increase pressure on primary care.

    Hazel Cheeseman, Director of Policy at Action on Smoking and Health said: ‘What we are seeing is short-term thinking. We know that smoking cessation services are one of the best value services in the NHS, and cutting them will only increase costs when the patients arrive in the acute sector.’

    Fiona Smith, the Royal College of Nursing’s lead for children and young people, said: ‘Services that school nurses usually provide could be moved over to primary care nurses, despite that workforce already being under pressure.’

    Source: Independent Nurse, 15 June 2015
    Link: http://bit.ly/1Ii2nB7

    Study estimates deaths attributable to cigarettes for 12 smoking-related cancers

    Research carried out in the US by the American Cancer Society and published in JAMA Internal Medicine, estimates that 48.5% of the nearly 346,000 deaths from 12 cancers among adults 35 and older in 2011 were attributable to cigarette smoking.

    The largest proportions of smoking-attributable deaths were for cancers of the lung, bronchus, trachea and larynx. About half of the deaths from cancers of the oral cavity, esophagus and urinary bladder were attributable to smoking.

    Source
    JAMA: Deaths due to cigarette smoking for 12 smoking-related cancers in the United States

    Source: Medical Xpress, 15 June 2015
    Link: http://bit.ly/1LdFOAC

    Law Society of Scotland on enforcing smoking ban in cars with children present

    Ahead of giving evidence on a bill that would make smoking in cars when children are present illegal, the Law Society of Scotland has said that enforcing the ban could prove “difficult”.

    Alison Britton, convener of the Law Society’s health and medical law committee, said: “Of course we support the policy intent behind this bill, and the harmful effects of smoking and second-hand smoke are well documented.” She added the society had concerns the legislation would be “difficult to enforce”.

    Source: BBC News, 16 June 2015
    Link: http://bbc.in/1JUSY6Z

    UN aviation agency bans electronic cigarettes in checked bags

    The International Civil Aviation Organization has announced a ban on electronic cigarettes in checked baggage, following reports they have caused fires in the cargo area of aircrafts.

    Airline passengers and crew are encouraged instead to carry the devices in the cabin “so that potential incidents could be immediately dealt with.”

    Source: France 24, 15 June 2015
    Link: http://f24.my/1ejyMjL

    Tobacco Manufactures Association says Levy on tobacco industry would put UK’s public services at risk

    In an open letter to the Guardian, Giles Roca, the Director General of the Tobacco Manufacturers’ Association, an organisation whose members include British American Tobacco, Gallaher Ltd. and Imperial Tobacco, says that a levy on the tobacco industry would be counterproductive.

    Roca suggests a levy would cost taxpayers money that could have been spent on public services, and lead to more illegal tobacco in the UK.

    [Editorial Note: For more information on the Tobacco Manufacturers’ Association see the TobaccoTactics website]

    Source: The Guardian, 15 June 2015
    Link: http://bit.ly/1fec1hc

    US: Teen smoking dropped after minimum sales age rose

    A study carried out by researchers at Brown University and published in the journal of Tobacco Control, reports that the Massachusetts town of Needham reduced teen smoking rates when it raised the minimum sales age for cigarettes to 21.

    In 2005, Needham became the first town in the US to raise the age of sale from 18 to 21. The research found that the prevalence of teen smoking in Needham dropped from 13% to 7%, a significantly greater drop than in the surrounding areas.

    Source
    Tobacco Control: Community reductions in youth smoking after raising the minimum tobacco sales age to 21

    Source: Medical Xpress, 15 June 2015
    Link: http://bit.ly/1SjRxBO

    Parliamentary Questions

    PQ1: Smoking in Cars with Children

    Luciana Berger Labour/Co-operative, Liverpool, Wavertree
    To ask the Secretary of State for Health, pursuant to the Answer of 8 June 2015 to Question 1077, on motor vehicles: smoking, whether the communications campaign is being developed by his Department or by an external agency; and what the cost of that campaign will be.

    Jane Ellison The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Health
    Public Health England will be running a multi-channel campaign to raise awareness of the legislation, starting in mid-September. Plans are still being finalised but will likely include advertising on radio, billboards and video on demand.

    Source: Hansard, Citation: HC Deb, 11 June 2015, cW)
    Link: http://bit.ly/1febTy9