ASH Daily news for 15 October 2015



HEADLINES

  • Brighton: Beach smoking ban report delayed after flood of consultation responses
  • London: Croydon Council seizes £500,000 worth of illicit tobacco
  • Scotland: Leading academic criticises “harmful” e-cigarette marketing
  • Ireland: Tobacco smuggling threatens revenue boost
  • US: Democrats want to raise smoking age to 21

    Brighton: Beach smoking ban report delayed after flood of consultation responses

    The consultation on a proposed smoking ban on Brighton and Hove’s beaches and parks received such a high volume of responses that the report analysing the consultation has been put back two months.

    More than 1,500 people took part in the consultation, which asked people what they thought about a voluntary smoking ban in a range of public outdoor spaces, including beaches, parks and pavements outside pubs and restaurants.

    The report was originally planned to go to the Health and Wellbeing board in December, but due to the amount of responses and interest in the consultation it will now go in February.

    Source: Brighton and Hove News, 14th October 2015
    Link: http://bit.ly/1KaZjY1

    London: Croydon Council seizes £500,000 worth of illicit tobacco

    An illegal tobacco factory that rolled out thousands of kilograms of counterfeit tobacco worth at least half a million pounds has been shut down.

    Six officers from the Croydon trading standards team, backed by police, found some 4,600 50g packets of bogus Golden Virginia rolling tobacco during a swoop on the production plant.

    The factory, which was equipped to produce industrial quantities of tobacco, is the first large-scale criminal manufacturing site to have been found in the borough.

    Officers discovered recipes, instructions and equipment for shredding, steaming and mixing raw leaves, as well as for packing and sealing the finished product.

    The raid, in late August, uncovered counterfeit tobacco ready for sale with an approximate street value of £85,000 and “significant quantities” of raw and part-processed leaves, additives, security labels and packets, Croydon Council said.

    Source: Croydon Guardian, 14th October 2015
    Link: http://bit.ly/1KaZ4Mt

    Scotland: Leading academic criticises “harmful” e-cigarette marketing

    Linda Bauld, Professor of Health Policy at Stirling University, has criticised “harmful” e-cigarette marketing tactics and called for new guidelines to regulate the industry.

    E-cigarette companies are currently allowed to advertise their products within a regulatory framework, meaning they cannot make smoking cessation claims or target youngsters.
    However, Ms Bauld believes there is “cause for concern” in the way companies are pushing their products.

    She said: “The evidence of marketing being targeted at children is mixed, but there’s definitely a lot of it…It’s a cause for concern and we need marketing regulations. The Advertising Standards Authority has a role to protect the public against harmful advertising.”

    See also:
    Expert calls for ad ban on e-cigarettes  – The Times (£)

    Source: Herald Scotland, 14th October 2015
    Link: http://bit.ly/1LlToRJ

    Ireland: Tobacco smuggling threatens revenue boost

    The 50c tax increase on cigarettes will not generate €60 million in extra revenue unless there is a clampdown on the sale of illegal tobacco, a public health charity and cigarette manufacturers have warned.

    Action on Smoking Health (ASH) Ireland said the failure to prevent easy access to cut-price tobacco could negate the measure’s positive effect on public health.

    Dr Ross Morgan, the chairman of ASH Ireland, welcomed the increase but said that easily accessible untaxed cigarettes encouraged more people to smoke.

    Source: The Times, 15th October 2015
    Link: http://thetim.es/1KaYmPw

    US: Democrats want to raise smoking age to 21

    Senate Democrats are pushing to increase the legal minimum age to smoke from 18 to 21.

    Democrats suggested that while the United States has made progress in curbing smoking, raising the legal minimum age could curb smoking-related diseases among younger Americans.

    The legislation follows a report released earlier this year by the Institute of Medicine that found raising the legal smoking age to 21 could result in 50,000 fewer deaths from lung cancer for people born between 2000 and 2019.

    Source: The Hill, 14th October 2015
    Link: http://bit.ly/1NIOTqa