ASH Daily News for 14 March 2017



  • Isle of Man: E-cigarettes may be offered to prisoners
  • Paralympic gold medallist Megan Giglia to launch ‘One You Cheshire East’
  • Report: Understanding NHS financial pressures
  • Europe: Health groups unite to condemn BAT sponsored conference
  • US: E-cigarettes a gateway to smoking? Not likely, according to new published research
  • US: Depression rates spike in teen smokers
  • Study explores alarming threat of emerging Asian tobacco companies to global health
  • US: CVS bolsters its fight to end tobacco use

Isle of Man: E-cigarettes may be offered to prisoners

Prisoners in the Isle of Man could be allowed to use e-cigarettes, the Manx government has announced. It said a six-month pilot was aimed at reducing “risks and harm” caused by inmates smoking “illicit materials” such as nicotine patches and tea bags.

In March 2008 the island prison became Europe’s first smoke-free jail.

The government will seek formal Tynwald backing this week for the measure, which would allow the use of disposable e-cigarettes on a trial basis at the discretion of the prison’s governor.

Source: BBC News – 13 March 2017
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Paralympic gold medallist Megan Giglia to launch ‘One You Cheshire East’

Paralympic gold medallist Megan Giglia will launch a new health initiative next week.

‘One You Cheshire East’ brings lifestyle and health advice services in the borough under one support system umbrella.
It focuses on early intervention to help residents live well for longer, by supporting them to drink less alcohol, eat well, lose weight, move more and be smokefree.

Source: Crewe and Nantwich Guardian – 14 March 2017
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Report: Understanding NHS financial pressures

NHS financial pressures are increasingly affecting patient care, often in ways that go unseen, according to a new report by The King’s Fund.

Understanding NHS financial pressures finds that access to and quality of care are both being affected in different ways across the NHS. While public attention tends to focus on high-profile examples of rationing such as restricting access to some types of treatment, the report authors warn that financial and other pressures are also affecting patient care in ways that often go ‘under the radar’.

The authors looked in detail at four services – testing and treatment for sexually transmitted infections, district nursing, elective hip replacement and neonatal care – to explore the impact of financial pressures on patient care.

See also:
Understanding NHS financial pressures, How are they affecting patient care?, King’s Fund

Source: Daily Mail – 11 March 2017
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Europe: Health groups unite to condemn BAT sponsored conference

On 22 March 2017, British American Tobacco is due to sponsor the European Conference on Fighting Organised Crime and Terrorism 2017, which lists as speakers and participants high-level EU officials alongside business representatives. As a sponsor, the company has input to the programme and provides speakers to this conference.

Following an appeal by Smoke Free Partnership and over 30 other European public health and tobacco control organisations, several EU officials declined their attendance.

Source: Smoke Free Partnership – 13 March 2017
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US: E-cigarettes a gateway to smoking? Not likely, according to new published research

Are e-cigarettes a gateway product that lead more people, especially teens, to smoke regular cigarettes? No, according to public health researchers from the University at Buffalo and the University of Michigan writing in the journal Drug and Alcohol Dependence.

“The national trends in vaping and cigarette smoking do not support the argument that vaping is leading to smoking,” said Lynn Kozlowski, the paper’s lead author and a professor of community health and health behaviour in UB’s School of Public Health and Health Professions.

Dr Kozlowski added that research in the U.S. shows that as use of e-cigarettes has increased, overall smoking rates have decreased.

Source: Medical Xpress – 13 March 2017
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US: Depression rates spike in teen smokers

Teenage smokers may have worse mental health than teen smokers of years past: the group has experienced a spike in depression in recent years, according to a new study.

Researchers found that, among smokers ages 12 to 17 in the US, the percentage who had depression increased from 16.0 percent in 2005 to 22.4 percent in 2013. That was the biggest increase in depression seen in the study, which looked at rates of depression among current smokers, former smokers and people who had never smoked, aged 12 and older.

The high rate of depression among teen smokers may make it harder for them to quit the habit, because depressed mood is known to pose a challenge to successfully stopping smoking, the researchers said.

Source: Yahoo! News – 13 March 2017
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Study explores alarming threat of emerging Asian tobacco companies to global health

There are already one billion tobacco smokers worldwide, and this number is likely to rise further with Asian tobacco companies poised to enter the global market, according to SFU health sciences professor Kelley Lee.

“While companies like British American Tobacco and Philip Morris, traditionally known as ‘Big Tobacco’, have been rightfully targeted by tobacco control efforts to date, on the horizon are several companies based in Asia ‘going global’ with their business strategies,” says Lee, a Tier I Canada Research Chair in Global Health Governance.

“Their aim is to grow their share of the world market through increased marketing, new products and lower prices. This is likely to mean more smokers worldwide.”

Lee and her team are the first to study the global business strategies of Asian tobacco companies, recently published in a special issue of Global Public Health entitled, “The Emergence of Asian Tobacco Companies: Implications for Global Health Governance.”

See also:
Cigarette sector poised for 5% growth on stable VAT, Business Standard

Source: My Informs – 13 March 2017
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US: CVS bolsters its fight to end tobacco use

CVS Health made headlines in 2014 when it took the decision to eliminate all tobacco products from its stores.

At the time, CEO Larry Merlo called the move “simply the right thing to do for the good of our customers and our company,” adding that “the sale of tobacco products is inconsistent with our purpose – helping people on their path to better health.”

Now, more than two years after tobacco was last sold in its stores, the company says it plans to fund $10 million in new and expanded programs as part of an effort to create the first tobacco-free generation. The money will support the second year of “Be The First,” CVS’ five year, $50 million commitment to getting young people to stop (or never start) smoking.

Source: Investopedia – 13 March 2017
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