ASH Daily News for 14 February 2017



NIHR seeking members of public to join advisory panels
Portsmouth: Radio presenter calls for a smoking ban at school gates and in parks
Long-term smoking can cause skin disease
US: Depression linked to e-cigarette use among college students
US: Truth Initiative turns tobacco advertising into a social justice issue
Indonesia: Yogyakarta residents reject tobacco industry exploitation


NIHR seeking members of public to join advisory panels

The NHS National Institute for Health Research is looking for members of the public to join a number of its advisory panels.

Visit NIHR website for more information about the role and how to apply.


Portsmouth: Radio presenter calls for a smoking ban at school gates and in parks

Radio presenter Warren Hayden asks whether the smoking ban should be expanded. He argues that after the smoking ban came into force in England in 2007, there were about 11,000 fewer hospital admissions for respiratory tract infections in children a year.

However, today people still smoke in parks and at school gates, exposing children to harmful secondhand smoke. Hayden says it is time to ban smoking in outdoor public places where there is a high concentration of children.

Source: The News – 14 February 2017
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Long-term smoking can cause skin disease

Smoking is associated with a number of skin conditions, including an increased risk of skin cancer and psoriasis, a chronic itchy skin condition.

Many of the chemicals contained in cigarette smoke, such as carbon monoxide, arsenic, formaldehyde and cyanide, constrict blood vessels and reduce the amount of oxygen the skin receives. The effects of reduced oxygen reaching the skin mean that the skin heals more slowly after an operation or cosmetic treatment and the results of the cosmetic treatment are often shorter-lived.

“The chemicals in cigarette smoke damage the DNA in skin cells. This increases the risk of a serious type of skin cancer called squamous cell carcinoma by more than 50%,” says Dr Judodihardjo, director at the Cellite Clinic in Cardiff.

Source: Wales Online, 13th February 2017
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US: Depression linked to e-cigarette use among college students

A new study by researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center, published in Nicotine & Tobacco Research, found a connection between depression and initiation of e-cigarette use among college students.

Among a sample of 5,445 undergraduate students from 24 colleges across Texas, students who experienced elevated levels of depressive symptoms were significantly more likely than students who did not experience elevated levels of depressive symptoms to start using e-cigarettes six months later.

However, in contrast with tobacco, e-cigarette use did not appear to lead to elevated depression levels among the students.

See also:
Depressive Symptoms Predict Current E-Cigarette Use Among College Students in Texas, Nicotine and Tobacco Research

Source: MedicalXpress – 13 February 2017
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US: Truth Initiative turns tobacco advertising into a social justice issue

The NGO Truth Initiative highlights the fact that smoking is not just a health issue, but a social justice issue in its new campaign #StopProfiling. The campaign takes aim at Big Tobacco’s advertising tactics targeting African-Americans and people with lower incomes.

In two videos, which premiered during the Grammy ceremony last Sunday, the campaign points out that black neighbourhoods have up to 10 times more tobacco advertisements, and low-income neighbourhoods are more likely to have tobacco retailers near schools.

Source: MyInforms – 13 February 2017
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Indonesia: Yogyakarta residents reject tobacco industry exploitation

On World Cancer Day, health advocates, artists and the people of Kali Code village, Yogyakarta unveiled “Show Your True Colors”, a community project to paint anti-tobacco graphic murals throughout the village. This initiative subverts the actions Philip Morris International, which gained national and international notoriety in 2015 by painting the village in the colours of one of its tobacco brands and cynically using it as part of its “Show Your Colors” marketing campaign.

According to The Tobacco Atlas, more than 2,677,000 children and 53,767,000 adults use tobacco in Indonesia. Tobacco kills 217,400 Indonesians every year and in 2010, it was the cause of 19.8 percent of deaths among adult men and 8.1 percent of deaths among adult women – higher than the average in other middle income countries.

Source: Antara News – 13 February 2017
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