ASH Daily News for 13 January 2017



  • Liverpool: Famous faces offer support to quit smoking
  • Brighton: Dropping butts costs three smokers £1k each
  • Spotting someone vaping can trigger cravings in smokers
  • Pakistan: Cigarette advertising affecting kids as young as six
  • New Zealand: Legality of tobacco product in question
  • Philippines: DOH chief opposes bill on 2-tier cigarette tax
  • Parliamentary Question

Liverpool: Famous faces offer support to quit smoking

A new public health campaign is being launched – backed by famous Liverpool faces – aimed at encouraging smokers aged 30 to 60 to quit.

Men are being targeted through the ‘Kick the Ciggies’ campaign at kicktheciggies.com focused around football which features Everton Football Club, along with Liverpool FC legend Jamie Carragher offering encouragement on the game plan and tactics needed to give up.

Women will be urged to ‘Chuck the Ciggies’ at chucktheciggies.com which features local actress and presenter Gemma Brodrick and a series of films with local women Danielle, Amy, Ginny, and Hilary who all quit smoking, sharing their tips and advice and giving encouragement.

Both sites will direct people towards Smokefree Liverpool.

Source: YB News – 12 January 2017
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Brighton: Dropping butts costs three smokers £1k each

Three people prosecuted for dropping cigarette butts in Brighton and Hove have been ordered to pay almost £1,000 each after failing to turn up to court.

Brighton Magistrates found the three guilty of dropping litter in the street after failing to pay a £75 fixed penalty that was issued at the time. Littering is contrary to Section 87 of the Environmental Protection Act and a criminal offence.

Source: Brighton and Hove News – 12 January 2017
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Spotting someone vaping can trigger cravings in smokers

Seeing someone use an e-cigarette may encourage smokers to light up, a study has warned.

A study by Chicago University found the devices were a ‘potent trigger’ to encourage young adult smokers to smoke as they mimic the same behaviour – inhaling and exhaling – and use the same hand and mouth movements as regular cigarettes.

The study, published in journal Nicotine & Tobacco Research, used 108 volunteers ranging from light smokers to those who went through a pack of cigarettes a day.

Source: Mail Online – 13 January 2017
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Pakistan: Cigarette advertising affecting kids as young as six

Multinational cigarette companies are breaking advertisement laws by targeting youth, a report has concluded.

According to the Network for Consumer Protection multinationals are systematically targeting children as young as six by using aggressive marketing techniques and placement of advertisements close to schools. The survey was conducted in six major cities including Islamabad, Rawalpindi, Peshawar, Lahore, Karachi, and Quetta with 500 sales points monitored overall.

Source: Daily Times – 13 January 2017
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New Zealand: Legality of tobacco product in question

Two of the world’s largest tobacco companies are at odds over whether a new tobacco product being launched in New Zealand is illegal.

Philip Morris kept the name of its “heat-not-burn” product Iqos secret in advance of its launch event.

However BAT’s head of legal and external affairs Saul Derber has now said it is BAT’s belief that the product is illegal in New Zealand, pointing to the Ministry of Health website, which stated “heat not burn” products were considered tobacco products for oral use, and their sale was prohibited under the Smoke-free Environments Act 1990.

Source: Otago Daily Times – 13 January 2017
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Philippines: DOH chief opposes bill on 2-tier cigarette tax

Health Secretary Paulyn Ubial has voiced her opposition to a new bill seeking to impose a two-tier excise tax structure on cigarettes.

The bill, which was approved and transmitted to the Senate in December, threatens to block the full implementation of the landmark Sin Tax Reform Law of 2012 passed under the Aquino administration.

Under the proposed measure, a pack of cigarettes with a net retail price of P11.50 and below would be taxed P32, while cigarette packs that cost more than P11.50 would be taxed P36.

The current law mandates that a unitary tax rate of P30 be imposed on all cigarette packs – regardless of price – by 2017.

See also:
Solon seeks to institutionalize ban on tobacco advertisement, PIA

Source: Rappler – 12 January 2017
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