ASH Daily news for 13 January 2015



HEADLINES

  • Vaping etiquette: the best way to ensure smoke without ire
  • Dental teams encouraged to support No Smoking Day
  • Australia: Smoking ban on private balconies proposed for Queensland
  • US: Many teens think ‘light smoking’ is safe
  • Philippines: Philip Morris reduces workforce by 13%
  • Parliamentary Questions

    Vaping etiquette: the best way to ensure smoke without ire

    The New Nicotine Alliance, an electronic cigarette users’ group set up to help fight “kneejerk” bans, is calling for an etiquette guide to encourage users to vape considerately.

    Lorien Jollye, a board member, said: “If you’re going to request that vaping isn’t banned in public places, then vapers themselves need to be considerate. It’s only polite.”

    Whilst the contents of a code are debatable, many agree that emitting clouds of vapour is impolite in public places. Other issues to consider may include the use of strong smelling flavoured electronic cigarettes in public.

    Source: The Times, 13 January 2015
    Link: http://thetim.es/1BWXziH

    Dental teams encouraged to support No Smoking Day

    Dentists are being encouraged to support No Smoking Day which will take place on 11 March 2015. Dr Mike Knapton, British Heart Foundation’s (BHF) Associate Medical Director, said: ‘Dentists have always played a big role in raising awareness of No Smoking Day and the dangers of smoking. Dental clinics should consider promoting the event in their offices in the weeks leading up to No Smoking Day.’

    A survey of 2,000 smokers by BHF found that fewer than a half (44%) of smokers in the UK are worried about the negative effects of smoking on their teeth, and only one in four (27%) are concerned about the effects of smoking on their gums.

    Smokers are 7-10 times more likely to suffer from oral cancer than individuals who have never smoked.

    Source: British Dental Journal, 9 January 2015
    Link: http://bit.ly/14UtF4h

    Australia: Smoking ban on private balconies proposed for Queensland

    Under proposed changes to the law, residents of Queensland may be banned from smoking on their balconies.

    The proposals come after research commissioned by Queensland’s attorney general, Jarrod Bleijie, found that smoke from neighbours sometimes forced non-smokers to keep their windows and doors shut.

    The Cancer Council Queensland welcomed the prospect of such a ban saying: “Almost one life is lost every day in Queensland due to second-hand smoke exposure.”

    Source: The Guardian, 13 January 2015
    Link: http://bit.ly/1wSripX

    US: Many teens think ‘light smoking’ is safe

    Research based on a survey by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and published in the journal Pediatrics has found that, whilst the vast majority of American teens say heavy daily smoking is a major health hazard, many believe that light smoking isn’t harmful.

    Stephen Amrock, the lead author of the study, said that whilst the findings of the study suggest that public health efforts have been working, efforts have likely been incomplete. Although anti-tobacco work has convinced adolescents that heavy smoking patterns are dangerous, the complete message has not been broadly received.

    Source
    Pediatrics: Adolescents’ perceptions of light and intermittent smoking in the United States

    Source: Medical Xpress, 13 January 2015
    Link: http://bit.ly/1y6LQB2

    Philippines: Philip Morris reduces workforce by 13%

    The Philippine affiliate of Philip Morris has said that it will cut 640 jobs at its Marikina plant in Manila, which is nearly 13 percent of its workforce in the country.

    A spokesman said that production volume had declined as a result of illicit tobacco and higher tobacco taxes.

    Source: Yahoo, 13 January 2015
    Link: http://yhoo.it/14PqriY

    Parliamentary Questions

    PQ1: Underage sales and illicit tobacco

    Jesse Norman (Hereford and South Herefordshire, Conservative)
    To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what guidance she has issued to local authorities and police forces on the use of community protection notices to tackle shops that persistently (a) sell prohibited goods to underage persons and (b) sell smuggled or counterfeit tobacco.

    To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what guidance she has issued to local authorities and police forces on the use of closure orders to tackle shops that persistently (a) sell prohibited goods to underage persons and (b) sell smuggled or counterfeit tobacco.

    Lynne Featherstone (The Minister of State, Home Department; Hornsey and Wood Green, Liberal Democrat)

    The Government published statutory guidance on 21 July 2014 for police, local councils, social landlords and others on the use of new anti-social behaviour powers in the Anti-social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014, including the community protection notice and closure power, which both came into force on 20 October 2014. This is general guidance and does not specifically refer to using the powers to tackle shops that persistently sell prohibited goods to underage persons or sell smuggled or counterfeit tobacco. However, the closure power can be used to close these premises for up to six months if they are causing nuisance or disorder. The statutory guidance is available at:

    https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/332839/StatutoryGuidanceFrontline.pdf.

    Source: Hansard (Citation: HC Deb, 8 January 2015, cW)
    Link: http://bit.ly/14UnSLS

    PQ2: Electronic Cigarettes

    Stephen McCabe (Shadow Minister (Education); Birmingham, Selly Oak, Labour)

    To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what information his Department holds on the number of e-cigarettes sold in the UK.

    To ask the Secretary of State for Health, whether the use of e-cigarettes in public places is subject to regulation or control.

    Jane Ellison (The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Health; Battersea, Conservative)
    The use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) in public places is not subject to regulation or control. E-cigarettes are not caught by smoke-free places legislation under the Health Act 2006. There are no current plans in England to restrict the use of e-cigarettes in public places. Some employers, owners, or managers of establishments and venues have chosen to prohibit the use of e-cigarettes on their premises.

    The Department does not currently collect data on the number of e-cigarettes sold in the United Kingdom. From May 2016, the revised Tobacco Products Directive will require manufacturers and importers of e-cigarettes and refill containers to notify the Government prior to placing products on the market.

    Source: Hansard (Citation: HC Deb, 8 January 2015, cW)
    Link: http://bit.ly/1yeBegd

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