ASH Daily news for 12 November 2015



HEADLINES

  • New study finds financial incentives to help pregnant women stop smoking are highly cost-effective
  • Nearly 28,000 people across East Anglia joined Stoptober
  • Ed Sheeran goes cold turkey after quitting smoking
  • Indonesia: Tobacco taxes to rise 11 per cent in Indonesia
  • Australia: Pilot programme finds success among smoking prisoners
  • Australia: Builders propose use of drones to enforce smoking ban on building burnt down by cigarette

    New study finds financial incentives to help pregnant women stop smoking are highly cost-effective

    The scientific journal Addiction published the first cost-effectiveness analysis of financial incentives to help pregnant women stop smoking.

    The study of 600 women found that those given up to £400 in vouchers quit smoking at a much higher rate than those that were not offered (22.5% versus 8.6%), and that their self-reported relapse rates 6 months postpartum were also lower (33% versus 54%).

    Researchers calculated it had a cost-effectiveness of £482 per quality-adjusted life year – a complex formula NICE uses to work out value for money – well within the recommended threshold of £20,000.
    See also:

    ‘Get pregnant mums to quit smoking – by paying them in shopping vouchers’  

    Source: EurekAlert, 12th November 2015
    Link: http://bit.ly/1PDKmVc

    Nearly 28,000 people across East Anglia joined Stoptober

    Nearly 28,000 people across the East of England signed up to take part in Stoptober, the country’s 28-day mass quitting challenge, new figures from Public Health England reveal.

    They joined more than 187,000 people around the country, reflecting latest figures which show substantial reductions in smoking over the past 30 years.

    However there are still about 8,000,000 smokers in England and smoking causes almost 80,000 deaths per year. Treating smoking-related diseases is estimated to cost the NHS £2billion each year.

    Source: Cambridge News, 12th November 2015
    Link: http://bit.ly/1kOtDTl

    Ed Sheeran goes cold turkey after quitting smoking

    Singer Ed Sheeran has given up smoking after worrying that he was getting to “the point of no return” with his nicotine habit.

    Starting smoking as a teenager, Ed Sheeran revealed that he has quit smoking “cold turkey” after 10 years of on and off smoking.

    He said: “I realised that I’d been smoking for 10 years and that’s bad. I started smoking when I was younger and I’d always say, like ‘I’m gonna quit. I’m gonna quit.’ And then, ‘Oh well, I haven’t been smoking for that long. It’s been, what, four years like that…’ and then when it got to 10 years, I was like, ‘Oh… I’m probably getting to the point of no return here.”

    Source: Belfast Telegraph, 10th November 2015
    Link: http://bit.ly/20O7Iws

    Indonesia: Tobacco taxes to rise 11 per cent in Indonesia

    The Indonesian government has announced an average increase in tobacco excise taxes of 11.19 per cent, which will take effect on 1st January 2016.

    Source: Tobacco reporter, 11th November 2015
    Link: http://bit.ly/1PDIXOc

    Australia: Pilot programme finds success among smoking prisoners

    A pilot quit smoking programme trialled on prisoners in Western Australia has shown to reduce the dependency of nicotine among smoking prisoners.

    The quitting program was adapted for 15 prisoners in the Eastern Goldfields Regional Prison (EGRP), whose population is predominately Aboriginal.

    The researchers measured participant’s addiction by how many cigarettes they smoked daily and the time they had their first cigarette after waking.

    The programme has been hailed a success after all participants cut down the number of cigarettes they smoked daily and more than 50 per cent recorded lighting up later in the day.

    Source: Medical Express, 10th November 2015
    Link: http://bit.ly/1MpnHaE

    Australia: Builders propose use of drones to enforce smoking ban on building burnt down by cigarette

    Builders of the Melbourne apartment that was burnt down by a cigarette in November 2014, suggest the use of drones to enforce the smoking ban.

    The fire caused $5 million worth of damages. In addition, the City Council has ordered owners to remove the flammable building material used on the balconies a further cost of $20 million.

    But the owners believe this could be avoided if drones were used to scan the building every three months to ensure residents are not smoking in the building.

    Source: Mail On Sunday, 12th November 2015
    Link: http://dailym.ai/1llh42q