ASH Daily news for 12 January 2016



HEADLINES

  • Mersey cancer centre research shows people “reluctant” to change unhealthy lifestyles
  • US: High percentage of non-smoking teenagers are at risk of serious illness from second-hand smoke
  • New study warns of harms of waterpipe smoking
  • A smartphone you can vape?
  • New Zealand: Government failing to adequately address tobacco harm for Māori

    Mersey cancer centre research shows people “reluctant” to change unhealthy lifestyles

    People are reluctant to change their unhealthy lifestyle choices even when they know it could make them ill, Merseyside cancer researchers say.

    Four out of five smokers are not willing to kick the habit to reduce their risk of getting cancer, according to the study by Clatterbridge Cancer Centre.

    Dr Peter Kirkbride said the study revealed “worrying attitudes” towards the disease.

    He said: “A healthier lifestyle can significantly reduce the risk of developing cancer as well as improving general health and wellbeing.

    “Eating better, moving more, drinking less alcohol and reducing sun exposure will mean you’re much less likely to develop cancer, and smokers can get lots of support to help them quit.”

    Source: Liverpool Echo, 11th January 2016
    Link: http://bit.ly/1Ooa4cP

    US: High percentage of non-smoking teenagers are at risk of serious illness from second-hand smoke

    Nearly half of non-smoking children and teenagers are exposed to second-hand smoke, according to a US Government study.

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) found close to 50 per cent of all middle and high school non-smokers encountered second-hand smoke in 2013.

    Although previous studies indicated that second-hand smoke exposure declined in recent years, this new study suggests that it’s still affecting millions of young people.

    Secondhand smoke has been linked to serious illnesses in children – including breathing problems, ear infections, bronchitis and pheumonia. In adults, it’s been associated with heart disease and lung cancer.

    Source: Mail Online, 11th January 2016
    Link: http://dailym.ai/1mTtLCD

    New study warns of harms of waterpipe smoking

    A new meta-analysis of waterpipe smoking led by the University Of Pittsburgh School Of Medicine shows that hookah smokers are inhaling a large quantity of toxicants.

    Researchers found that, compared with a single cigarette, one hookah session delivers approximately 125 times the smoke, 25 times the tar, 2.5 times the nicotine and 10 times the carbon monoxide.

    The authors note however, that comparing a shisha smoking session to smoking a single cigarette is not ideal because of the differences in smoking patterns, but that’s the way the underlying studies report their findings.

    Source: Medical Xpress, 11th January 2016
    Link: http://bit.ly/1ULBa1i

    A smartphone you can vape?

    The Jupiter IO 3 is the world’s first e-cigarette phone, which will allow people to make phone calls and inhale nicotine vapour from the same device.

    Removing a plastic cover on top of the phone allows the user to attach liquid vaping cartridges that come in a variety of flavours. The phone becomes a vaping device by attaching a mouthpiece to the cartridge.

    Source: Mirror, 11th January 2016
    Link: http://bit.ly/1PTTS5Q

    New Zealand: Government failing to adequately address tobacco harm for Māori

    Māori smoking rates have barely changed since 2011, and the Government is not doing enough to address tobacco-related harm amongst Māori, say leading tobacco researchers and public health advocates.

    The Government’s actions on the Māori Affairs Select Committee’s 2010 recommendations for addressing tobacco-related harm have been reviewed and published in the New Zealand Medical Journal. This review shows, five years on, little or no progress on several key measures recommended in the Committee’s report.

    “Only eight out of 42 recommendations have been fully implemented and we believe the failure to complete or adequately advance the remaining 34 recommendations is hindering progress towards the Smokefree 2025 goal, particularly for Māori,” conclude the review authors.

    Source: Foreign Affairs, 12th January 2016
    Link: http://bit.ly/1ZpxCZk