ASH Daily news for 11 June 2015



HEADLINES

  • ASA bans five e-cigarette ads for appealing to under 18s
  • ‘Smoking Still Kills’ – that’s why we’re committed to a strategy to tackle tobacco
  • Scotland: Woman rescued from ‘cigarette fire’ in Fife flat
  • Using social media to kick the habit means you’re ‘twice as likely to succeed’
  • US: Poll shows 10% of adults are now vaping
  • US: Kentucky tobacco farm suits allege low pay, poor housing
  • Australia: Expert argues against smokescreen on e-cigarette research

    ASA bans five e-cigarette ads for appealing to under 18s

    The Advertising Standards Authority has banned five ads by Hubbly Bubbly, the e-cigarettes company, for being irresponsible. The ads featured on social media sites and on the Hubbly Bubbly website.

    The Medicines & Healthcare products Regulatory Authority complained that two of the ads did not make clear that the product contained nicotine, were irresponsible because they would appeal to under 18s, and that a third seemed to show people who were under 25.

    The ASA questioned the apparent age of the people appearing in three of the ads. The adjudication also said that as Hubbly Bubbly was promoting all of its range of products, there was a need to mention nicotine content.

    With regards to the celebrity names used, in particular Zayn Malik and Cheryl Fernandez-Versini, the ad would appeal to under 18s, the watchdog said.

    Following the complaints, Hubbly Bubbly removed the ads.

    Source: Marketing Magazine – 10 June 2015
    Link: http://bit.ly/1S72TsT

    ‘Smoking Still Kills’ – that’s why we’re committed to a strategy to tackle tobacco

    Cancer Research UK’s chief executive, Harpal Kumar, spoke at the Parliamentary launch of ASH’s new report, Smoking Still Kills. This is the text of Harpal’s speech.

    See also:
    – Tobacco firms ‘should face annual levy’, Environmental Health New (CIEH)
    – John Moxham: Smoking still kills, BMJ Blogs
    – Perry Spiller, BBC Radio Stoke

    – ASH’s Director of policy talks about the new report. (starts around 01:09:00)
    – 
    Pictures: Smoking Still Kills launch, Flickr

    Source: Cancer Research UK – 10 June 2015
    Link: http://bit.ly/1S754gc

    Scotland: Woman rescued from ‘cigarette fire’ in Fife flat

    A woman was rescued by firefighters after a blaze broke out in the living room of her flat in Fife.

    The fire at the house in Glencraig was believed to have been caused by a cigarette or other smoking material.

    The woman, who was brought from the flat by firefighters wearing breathing apparatus, suffered smoke inhalation in Tuesday evening’s incident and was treated at the scene.

    Source: BBC News – 10 June 2015
    Link: http://bbc.in/1S7333F

    Using social media to kick the habit means you’re ‘twice as likely to succeed’

    People who use social media to kick the habit are twice as likely to succeed, a study found. This was compared with people using more traditional methods like phone-based support.

    As part of the study, one group of young adults used a social media-based campaign, which was developed by the Canadian Cancer Society in 2012.

    Called ‘Break it Off’, it compared quitting smoking with ending a romantic relationship, and provided users with an interactive website and smartphone app to encourage them to give up.

    After three months of using the social-media based campaign, 32 per cent of smokers had quit, compared to 14 per cent of their peers using the phone-based support.

    Source: Daily Mail – 10 June 2015
    Link: http://dailym.ai/1S7477y

    US: Poll shows 10% of adults are now vaping

    Significantly more Americans are using electronic-cigarettes and other vaporizing devices than a year ago, but most of those consumers are also smoking conventional cigarettes, according to a new Reuters/Ipsos poll.

    About 10% of US adults now vape, according to the online Reuters/Ipsos poll of 5,679 Americans conducted between May 19 and June 4. That’s almost four times as high as a US government estimate that 2.6% of adults used e-cigarettes in 2013.

    About 15% of poll participants under the age of 40 now vape. In 2013, 18.8% of those 18 to 24 and 20.1% of those 25 to 44 smoked cigarettes, according to the government data.

    Almost 70% of current users started in the past year alone, and about three quarters of them also smoke cigarettes, according to the poll.

    See also:
    – E-cigarette usage surges in past year-Reuters/Ipsos poll, Reuters
    – Most who vape still smoke: Reuters poll, Reuters [includes video]

    Source: Business Insider – 10 June 2015
    Link: http://bit.ly/1S73kDJ

    US: Kentucky tobacco farm suits allege low pay, poor housing

    Lawsuits have been filed against five tobacco farms in Kentucky by migrant workers claiming they were paid insufficient wages and forced to live in deplorable conditions despite being hired through the federal H-2A program.

    The three federal lawsuits were filed by Southern Migrant Legal Services (SMLS), a Nashville-based organization that handles legal matters for migrant workers in several southern states including Kentucky and Tennessee. According to SMLS, 39 guest workers filed the suits that allege violations of federal and state labor and civil rights laws, and a pattern of illegal conduct by employers in the Kentucky tobacco industry.

    Source: Farm World – 10 June 2015
    Link: http://bit.ly/1S74mzj

    Australia: Expert argues against smokescreen on e-cigarette research

    A leading Australian substance abuse expert is pleading for moderation in policies on e-cigarettes.

    The University of Queensland’s Professor Wayne Hall said current law on electronic nicotine delivery systems placed researchers – and people who wanted to use e-cigarettes to quit smoking – in a difficult situation.

    E-cigarettes containing nicotine cannot legally be sold in Australia.

    See also:
    – Editorial: It makes no sense to treat e-cigarettes in the same way as tobacco, Herald Scotland

    Source: DDD Mag – 10 June 2015
    Link: http://bit.ly/1S74u1U