ASH Daily News for 11 February 2019



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UK

  • Opinion: The debate around e-cigarettes drowns out the need to implement a full range of tobacco control measures
  • Smoking rates during pregnancy remain high in Leeds

International

  • New Zealand: Smoking in cars to be banned when children present
  • Australia: Department of Health investigating PMI Ferrari sponsorship

 

UK

Opinion: The debate around e-cigarettes drowns out the need to implement a full range of tobacco control measures

Nick Hopkinson, Reader in Respiratory Medicine, medical director for the British Lung Foundation and ASH trustee, has argued that the prominence of e-cigarettes, and the ensuing debate around their safety, are in danger of drowning out the work needed to implement a full range of tobacco control measures.

He argues that in the 60 years since the health harms of smoking were evidenced, not enough has been done to prevent the uptake of smoking and protect people from dying prematurely of smoking related diseases. Action to address these from the government has been tardy, tentative, and undermined by the tobacco industry at every stage.

There has also been a second, significant failure in the level of stop smoking support offered. The developing popularity of e-cigarettes reflects the effectiveness of their use as a quitting aid and it is unreasonable to object to smokers using them.

Source: BMJ, 8 February 2019

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Smoking rates during pregnancy remain high in Leeds

In Leeds, around one in 10 pregnant smokers are still smoking at the time of delivery, with experts citing budget cuts as the reason for a lack of reduction in these rates.
Smoking in pregnancy increases the risk of miscarriage, premature birth, stillbirth, low birth-weight, and sudden infant death syndrome. Despite the well-known risks, there has been limited success in reducing the number of pregnant smokers in Leeds due to a lack of funding for smoking cessation services.

Hazel Cheeseman, Director of Policy at Action on Smoking and Health, said: “There is no single reason why rates of smoking among pregnant women are not falling equally around the country. Local lack of progress should be a serious cause of concern for the whole health care system given the long term impacts on child health and immediate pressures this places on maternity and other services.”

Source: LeedsLive, 9 February 2019

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International

New Zealand: Smoking in cars to be banned when children present

The government has announced that smoking will be banned in cars when children under 18 years old are present. The ban is to include the use of e-cigarettes and is applicable in moving and parked cars. Once the law has been changed, due at the end of 2019, police will be able to require people to stop smoking in cars, refer them to stop smoking services or issue a fine of NZ$50.

According to research by ASH New Zealand in 2014, 100,000 children a week were exposed to second-hand smoke. Associate Health Minister Jenny Salesa has said “the rate of reduction in children exposed to smoking in vehicles is slowing. First and foremost, this change is about protecting children. However, it is also part of the Government’s commitment to achieving Smokefree 2025 [fewer than 5% of the population smoking].”

Source: New Zealand Herald, 10 February 2019

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Australia: Department of Health investigating PMI Ferrari sponsorship

Australia’s Department of Health and Victoria’s Department of Health and Human Services are investigating whether Philip Morris International’s (PMI) sponsorship of Ferrari is in breach of tobacco advertising bans, ahead of the Melbourne Grand Prix. The Australian Communications and Media Authority has also launched a separate investigation.

PMI’s Mission Winnow logo appears on Ferrari uniforms and cars and has drawn complaints due to its similarity to the Marlboro logo. PMI have previously been required to remove their barcode designs on Ferrari cars in 2010, after they were found to be subliminal forms of tobacco advertising.

Source: Autosport, 9 February 2019

See also: The Sydney Morning Herald, Philip Morris under fire for new logo on Ferrari F1 Uniforms

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