ASH Daily news for 10 September 2015



HEADLINES

  • CIEH drafting enforcement guidance to prevent smoking in cars with minors
  • Southend: Smokers urged to join Stoptober
  • Oldham: Council will not prohibit staff smoking breaks
  • Scotland: Campaigners urge Parliament to limit engagement with tobacco industry
  • Stress leads 90% of mothers to resume smoking after pregnancy, study finds
  • Smoking worsens diabetes complications, but quitting may help
  • Parliamentary Questions:

    CIEH drafting enforcement guidance to prevent smoking in cars with minors

    The Charted Institute of Environmental Health (CIEH) is developing guidance to help officials in England enforce the new legislation making it an offence for people to smoke in private cars when young people are present.

    The new legislation will come into force on 1st October.

    The enforcement guidelines will be published on 18 September and will be available on the CIEH website for everyone to view and download.

    Source: CIEH, 9th September 2015
    Link: http://bit.ly/1JWsjE4

    Southend: Smokers urged to join Stoptober

    Smokers in Southend are being urged to join the Stoptober campaign to help them quit – and to encourage their families and friends to do so too.

    The annual 28-day mass quit drive during October, led by Public Health England, is supported by celebrities, and this year includes a national road-show coming to Southend on Friday September 25.

    Southend is the only town in the East of England to host the Stoptober roadshow which offers smokers guidance and encouragement to stop smoking.

    Source: Halstead Gazette, 9th September 2015
    Link: http://bit.ly/1NjtOka

    Oldham: Council will not prohibit staff smoking breaks

    Oldham Council will not be following Nottinghamshire County Council footsteps by banning staff from smoking during working hours.

    The Labour-run council has forbidden cigarette breaks in a blanket ban on all employees. Electronic cigarettes are also banned at work.

    But an Oldham Council spokesman said: “We operate a flexible working policy, which means managers have discretion to allow staff to effectively clock out, so long as they make the time up and work their contracted hours.”

    Source: Oldham Evening Chronicle, 9th September 2015
    Link: http://bit.ly/1Fz8fWs

    Scotland: Campaigners urge Parliament to limit engagement with tobacco industry

    Leading health professionals and charities have urged Holyrood to limit engagement with the tobacco industry after a senior representative from Japan Tobacco International (JTI) gave evidence to MSPs about electronic cigarettes.

    Their public petition highlights that the UK is bound by the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control, and calls on the Scottish Parliament to adhere to these international guidelines which sets restrictions on the engagement with the tobacco industry.

    See also:

    Scottish Parliament must take tougher stance on tobacco lobbyists, say campaigners 

    Source: Arbroath Herald, 10th September 2015
    Link: http://bit.ly/1JY0gq0

    Stress leads 90% of mothers to resume smoking after pregnancy, study finds

    Sleepless nights and the stress of caring for a new-born are driving mothers who stopped smoking in pregnancy to light up again, despite the potential damage to their baby.

    New research shows that the strains of motherhood are leading up to 90% of women who had quit to resume smoking, especially those from lower socio-economic backgrounds.

    A study of interviews with 1,031 women who had given birth found that some mothers go back to cigarettes under pressure from friends or because they see it as a way of regaining their identity.

    The findings prompted calls for “a cultural shift” so that quitters do not relapse once they become mothers.

    Source: The Guardian, 10th September 2015
    Link: http://bit.ly/1KbxnYM

    Smoking worsens diabetes complications, but quitting may help

    A new study has found that people with type 2 diabetes who smoke have significantly higher risks of heart disease, stroke, and death than diabetic non-smokers.

    Smokers also had higher risks of clogged arteries, heart failure, and reduced blood flow to the limbs.

    The risks were lower for diabetics who quit smoking, but still moderately higher than risks among never smokers, the researchers write in the journal Circulation.

    Source: Reuters, 9th September 2015
    Link: http://reut.rs/1OBQL0w

    Parliamentary Questions:

    PQ1: Foreign and Commonwealth Office

    Philip Davies Conservative, Shipley

    To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 16 July 2015 to Question 6077, how many (a) meetings and (b) emails his Department has had with the organisation Action on Smoking and Health in drafting these guidelines.

    Hugo Swire, Minister of State, Foreign and Commonwealth Office 

    Foreign and Commonwealth Office officials met with Action on Smoking and Health (ASH) in June 2012 to discuss updating our 2005 tobacco guidance so as to ensure it reflected our commitments under Article 5.3 of the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control which was adopted in 2009. This department exchanged six emails with ASH between 30 June 2012 and December 2013 when the new guidelines were issued to posts.

    PQ2: Foreign and Commonwealth Office

    Philip Davies Conservative, Shipley

    To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 16 July 2015 to Question 6077, which organisations he consulted when drafting that guidance.

    Hugo Swire, Minister of State, Foreign and Commonwealth Office 

    The Department of Health were consulted and became co-authors of this guidance as they lead on tobacco control and the implementation of the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control. We also consulted with UK Trade and Investment. Action on Smoking and Health also sent us their recommendations.

    Source: Citation: HC Deb, 9 September 2015, cW
    Link: http://bit.ly/1Fz9GnM