ASH Daily News for 10 May 2018



print
UK

  • Smoking cessation services should be ‘co-located’ in gyms
  • Greater Manchester: Impact of smoking during pregnancy
  • Scotland: New research on access to health harming products like tobacco, fast food and alcohol

International

  • Imperial Brands set to sell-off chunks of the company as it looks to focus on global vaping craze
  • US: New HOPE centre to focus on smoking cessation in LGBTQ population

UK

Smoking cessation services should be ‘co-located’ in gyms

A report from the Royal Society for Public Health has suggested that stop smoking services could be located in fitness facilities. The report, co-authored with fitness charity UKactive, surveyed more than 800 gym and leisure centre users as part of a wider look into the role of exercise professionals in public health, and found that 51% of those were “comfortable” with smoking cessation services being located within gym facilities.

The charity went on to recommend that commissioners look to “embed the co-location of smoking cessation services in fitness facilities”. RSPH chief executive Shirley Cramer said: “As this report demonstrates, exercise professionals have a great opportunity to be an active part of this wider public health workforce, and there is appetite from the public for this to happen.”

Source: Nursing in Practice, 9 May 2018

Read Article

 

Greater Manchester: Impact of smoking during pregnancy

One in eight mums-to-be in Greater Manchester smoke throughout their pregnancy, new figures have revealed. Out of the 8,968 women in the region who gave birth in the third quarter of 2017/18, 1,106 were recorded as smokers.

Action on Smoking and Health (ASH), a charity that works to eliminate the harm caused by tobacco, said: “If a woman smokes or is exposed to secondhand smoke in pregnancy it restricts oxygen to the baby and prevents it developing properly. This means babies might be born with health problems and can lead to miscarriage, stillbirth and cot death.”

Source: Manchester Evening News, 9 May 2018

Read Article

 

Scotland: New research on access to health harming products like tobacco, fast food and alcohol

NHS Health Scotland welcomes research out this week by Glasgow University showing that outlets selling tobacco, alcohol and fast food are clustered in poorer areas. This adds to what we know about the impact of where we live, work, rest and play has on our health.

Andrew Fraser, Director of Public Health at NHS Health Scotland said: “We’ve long argued that being healthy is about more than making healthy choices. To address the harm from alcohol, tobacco and being overweight or obese, we must address the environment we live in. We know that people in poorer areas experience more harm from alcohol, tobacco and fast food than those in more affluent areas. This research could explain part of the reason – put simply, it is easier to access the things that harm our health.”

See also:
Science Direct, Do ‘environmental bads’ such as alcohol, fast food, tobacco, and gambling outlets cluster and co-locate in more deprived areas in Glasgow City, Scotland?

Source: NHS Health Scotland, 9 May 2018

Read Article

 

International

Imperial Brands set to sell-off chunks of the company as it looks to focus on global vaping craze

Imperial Brands looks to sell-off more than £2 billion of tobacco businesses as it moves its focus to e-cigarettes.The maker of Winston, Kool and Gauloises is shedding chunks of the company to cash in on vaping products, which have seen huge growth in recent years. Bosses are hoping to grab hold of swathes of the world’s 1 billion tobacco smokers.

Vaping is gaining ground with 30 to 50 million users around the world, in particular in the UK and US.

See also:
The Evening Standard, Imperial Brands in £2 billion sell-off amid anger over shares dive
Reuters, Imperial brands to sell assets, simplify business

Source: Mail Online, 9 May 2018

Read Article

 

US: New HOPE centre to focus on smoking cessation in LGBTQ population

The Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah has announced the opening of the Cancer Population Sciences and Huntsman Center for Health Outcomes and Population Equity (HOPE). This research and clinical space will be dedicated to improving health in undeserved populations.

Amongst other things, the centre is trying to gain a better understanding of the factors that underlie smoking cessation among LGBTQ individuals, whilst another focuses on increasing the number of low-income smokers at 30 Federally Qualified Health Centers across Utah who receive evidence-based tobacco cessation interventions.

Current Utah smoking rates among low income, American Indian/Alaska Native, African American, and LGBTQ communities are significantly higher than the state average.

Source: Science Magazine

Read Article