ASH Daily news for 10 February 2016



HEADLINES

  • Cambridge: Man pays £684 after dropping cigarette end
  • US: Marlboro smokers should get cancer screening, jury told
  • Guam: ban on smoking in bars to become law in 2017
  • Canada: Smokers’ Helpline sees surge in calls after toll-free number included on cigarette packaging
  • Bahrain: Tobacco duty hike confirmed
  • New Zealand: Increase taxes on tobacco to improve health, says Professor
  • South Africa: Newlands declared non-smoking stadium

    Cambridge: Man pays £684 after dropping cigarette end

    A man in Cambridge was ordered to pay a total of £684 after dropping a cigarette end in front of a Tesco store.

    He was witnessed dropping the cigarette end in front of the city council’s enforcement officers and was issued with a fixed penalty notice as an alternative to prosecution.

    Source: Cambridge News, 10th February 2016
    Link: http://bit.ly/1TRN1x0

    US: Marlboro smokers should get cancer screening, jury told

    Philip Morris USA should pay for annual chest scans for thousands of long-time Marlboro smokers in Massachusetts because the company sold a defective and unreasonably dangerous product, a lawyer for the smokers told jurors at the close of a trial.

    The jury of eight men and two women heard evidence over eight days in the class-action case, which was filed 10 years ago. Members of the class must be at least 50 years old, have purchased Marlboros in Massachusetts and have smoked at least a pack a day for 20 years.

    Source: The Washington Post, 10th February 2016
    Link: http://bit.ly/1PNgNBg

    Guam: ban on smoking in bars to become law in 2017

    Smoking in bars will be prohibited in Guam next year under a measure that expands provisions to the island’s anti-smoking law.

    The Legislature voted last month in favour of expanding the Natasha Smoking Act 2005 to include bars in the list of establishments where indoor smoking is prohibited. The new provision takes effect Jan. 1, 2017.

    Source: The Washington Times, 9th February 2016
    Link: http://bit.ly/1Q6QgKO

    Canada: Smokers’ Helpline sees surge in calls after toll-free number included on cigarette packaging

    A study supported by the Canadian Cancer Society has found a major jump in calls to a smokers’ helpline after its telephone number was included on all packaging for cigarettes, as a result of a federal regulation from Health Canada.

    The study began in March 2012 when the new national regulation regarding cigarette package warnings came into effect. This regulation included enlarging pictorial health warnings from 50% to 75% of the package, as well as including a toll-free quitline telephone number and website address.

    In the first 7 months of the study of Ontario’s Smokers’ Helpline there was a 160% increase in the number of calls to the quitline and a sustained increase of 80% in the months following the implementation of the regulation. New callers receiving treatment after calling the quitline also increased by 174%. Calls were measured through to December 2013.

    Source: Morning Star, 9th February 2016
    Link: http://bit.ly/1QV3I80

    Bahrain: Tobacco duty hike confirmed

    A senior state official has confirmed that the price of tobacco products and alcohol beverages will increase in Bahrain.

    The official confirmation came as he commented on reports stating that a customs tax of 200 to 225 pc will be imposed on cigarettes, shisha molasses (hookah tobacco) and alcohol beverages.

    Source: News of Bahrain, 9th February 2016
    Link: http://bit.ly/1SHM62Z

    New Zealand: Increase taxes on tobacco to improve health, says Professor

    The Government should continue to raise taxes on tobacco to at least 20 per cent a year, health professionals and advocacy groups have told Parliament.
    Tobacco taxes rose by 10 per cent on January 1, the last of four consecutive annual increases.

    Parliament’s finance and expenditure committee heard that further tax hikes should be introduced over the next few years to curb smoking rates in New Zealand, which are around 17 per cent.

    Professor Nick Wilson, from the University of Otago’s public health department, said increasing the cost of tobacco was “one of the most powerful things that can be done” to improve the health of the population.

    Source: New Zealand Herald, 10th February 2016
    Link: http://bit.ly/1PkvFFK

    South Africa: Newlands declared non-smoking stadium

    Newlands rugby stadium has been declared a non-smoking facility, in compliance with the requirements of the tobacco legislation.

    After consultation with City of Cape Town Health Officials and in line with legislation, no smoking of any kind will be allowed in the stadium.

    Previously the stadium featured four designated smoking areas in the corners of the ground, with smoking in the stands prohibited, but this is no longer allowed and all forms of smoking (including the use of e-cigarettes) in any part of the stadium is now prohibited.

    Source: Sport24, 9th February 2016
    Link: http://bit.ly/1o2e7Wl