ASH Daily news for 10 December 2015



HEADLINES

  • BAT faces more bribery claims in Africa
  • Lincolnshire: Cigarette swoop on shops strikes blow against smugglers in Spalding
  • Germany: Tobacco lobby stubs out total German tobacco ad ban
  • Nigeria: Philip Morris is flooding Nigeria with 122 million ‘units’ of cigarettes
  • US: Teens working in tobacco fields face health risks

    BAT faces more bribery claims in Africa

    Cigarette manufacturer British American Tobacco (BAT) is caught up in yet another bribery scam in Uganda, days after the firm was reported to have bribed Kenya’s former Trade minister.

    Solomon Muyita, an ex-employee of British American Tobacco Uganda, has claimed that the tobacco firm bribed a local environmental official to misreport the impact from a fire at one of its warehouses in Uganda.

    Source: Business Daily Africa, 9th December 2015
    Link: http://bit.ly/1PXWwtY

    Lincolnshire: Cigarette swoop on shops strikes blow against smugglers in Spalding

    A joint operation where more than 17,000 illegal cigarettes were seized from shops in Spalding is a blow against “organised crime”.

    Sgt Kimble Enderby of Lincolnshire Police’s Licensing Department, said: “The sale of non-duty paid or smuggled goods is organised crime and store operators who are prepared to sell these goods, serve to promote this criminality.”

    Three unidentified shops in Spalding were raided by Lincolnshire Trading Standards and Alcohol Licensing Team police officers.

    The raids were carried out after tip-offs from the public and “test purchases” which led to search warrants being issued.

     

    Source: Spalding Today, 9th December 2015
    Link: http://bit.ly/1M4BqlN

    Germany: Tobacco lobby stubs out total German tobacco ad ban

    The plans of the Federal Minister for Food, Agriculture and Consumer Protection, Christian Schmidt, to ban tobacco advertising have been scaled back. Critics have cited pressure from the tobacco industry, the Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs, and the Chancellery as the reason why.

    The outdoor ban will not come into effect in mid-2018, as previously planned, but will be delayed by two years. Secondly, there will be no blanket-ban on cinema advertising; it will only apply to films that are aimed at children and young people. The third change means cigarette and pipe tobacco producers will not have to include so-called shock images, such as diseased lungs and rotten teeth, on their packaging.

    Source: EurActiv, 10th December 2015
    Link: http://bit.ly/1Y4stzO

    Nigeria: Philip Morris is flooding Nigeria with 122 million ‘units’ of cigarettes

    Philip Morris International secured an approval to import 122 million ‘units’ of cigarettes into Nigeria from September 2015 to March 2016, the Environmental Rights Action/Friends of the Earth International has said.

    Mr. Oluwafemi, Deputy Director of ERA/FoEN, said flooding the country with the “unlicensed, tax-not-paid” cigarettes was a deliberate violation of the National Tobacco Control Act.

    “Through this illicit import, PMINTL Nigeria Limited will assault our public health with 122 million units of the identified cigarette brands within seven‎ months,” Mr. Oluwafemi said.

    Source: Premium Times, 9th December 2015
    Link: http://bit.ly/1RGdjB7

    US: Teens working in tobacco fields face health risks

    Many teenagers who work long hours on tobacco farms in the United States are getting sick, reporting symptoms like vomiting, dizziness and a loss of appetite, according to a Human Rights Watch report released on Wednesday.

    The New York–based group called on the U.S. government and tobacco companies to bar children under 18 from working in direct contact with tobacco.

    “These are kids who are too young to legally walk into a store and buy a pack of cigarettes,” said Margaret Wurth, a children’s rights researcher at Human Rights Watch and a co-author of the report. “Yet they are working long hours tending the tobacco that goes into the cigarettes. It’s not right, and it has to change.”

    Source: Aljazeera America, 9th December 2015
    Link: http://bit.ly/1Y4tqYT