ASH Daily News for 1 July 2019



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UK

  • North East: Call for more action to cut smoking toll 12 years after ban introduced in public buildings
  • West Midlands: Dudley is one of UK’s vape shop hotspots

International

  • India asks states not to work with Phillip Morris-led anti-smoking group
  • San Francisco vape ban could hinder war on tobacco, say UK experts

 

UK

North East: Call for more action to cut smoking toll 12 years after ban introduced in public buildings

A YouGov poll commissioned by Action on Smoking and Health (ASH) 12 years after the introduction of smokefree legislation in England – found 74% of people in the North East support more action to limit smoking, compared to 77% nationally.

Among new polices being called for are:
• Requiring businesses to have a licence to sell tobacco which they can lose if they sell to underage smokers (80% support in the North East).
• Making tobacco manufacturers pay a levy or licence fee to Government to help smokers quit and prevent young people from taking up smoking (73% support in the North East).
• Increasing the age of sale from 18 to 21 (61% support in the North East).
• Requiring tobacco manufacturers to include Government mandated information about quitting inside cigarette packs (64% support in the North East).
With publication of the Government’s Prevention Green Paper due imminently, ASH is calling on Health Secretary Matt Hancock to include a commitment to ending smoking in all our communities by 2035.

Deborah Arnott, chief executive of ASH, said: “Ending smoking by 2035 is a worthy ambition for the Prevention Green Paper. To do so would make the single most significant contribution to delivering the Government’s goal of five extra healthy years of life but achieving the end of smoking will require innovative new policies and funding.”

She added: “Business as usual will not suffice. The Government must respond to public demand and impose a ‘polluter pays’ levy on the tobacco industry and implement tougher laws on smoking, such as increasing the age of sale for cigarettes to 21.”

Source: The Shield’s Gazette, 30 June 2019

Action on Smoking and Health: Regional breakdowns of support for new tobacco regulations

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West Midlands: Dudley is one of UK’s vape shop hotspots

An analysis of vape shop location data has revealed that Dudley has one of the highest concentrations of vape shops per person in the country. With 29 vape shops, the town has approximately one for every 11,014 people living there. This is nearly double the national average of one vape shop for every 20,109 residents.

Sandwell had one vape shop for every 12,518 people, Wolverhampton had one for every 12,996 people, and Walsall had one for every 15,627 people. The information on vape store listings was taken from the UK Vape Store Locator website. It attempts to map every vape store in the UK.

A government report in February 2019 found that between 5.4% and 6.2% of adults currently vape in Britain.

Source: Birmingham Live, 30 June 2019

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International

India asks states not to work with Phillip Morris-led anti-smoking group

India’s health ministry has asked all state governments in the country not to partner with the Foundation for a Smoke-Free World (FSFW) because of its links to tobacco giant Philip Morris International Inc.

Established in 2017, the FSFW says it focuses on eliminating cigarettes through the use of new technologies and alternative products. It says it works independently, but the World Health Organization (WHO) has said there are “clear conflicts” due to the $80 million in annual funding the foundation receives from Philip Morris.

At least three Indian tobacco control groups earlier this year wrote to the federal health ministry in New Delhi calling for the rejection of any possible partnerships with FSFW. India’s federal health ministry has sent a letter, dated June 24, to chief secretaries of all states, saying they should not partner with FSFW and also advised other departments and institutions in their region to act accordingly.

Source: Business Standard, 30 June 2019

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San Francisco vape ban could hinder war on tobacco, say UK experts

San Francisco’s ban on sales of e-cigarettes could set back the war on smoking, according to public health experts in the UK who advocate vaping as a way to quit. As shopkeepers in San Francisco contemplate having to clear their shelves of vaping devices before the New Year, many in public health are looking at ways to encourage more smokers to try them.

This week in the north-east of England, an NHS taskforce urged doctors and nurses to talk to patients about smoking and reassure them vaping is safer. An evidence review in 2018 confirmed that e-cigarettes were likely to be at least 95% less harmful than tobacco.

Martin Dockrell, the head of tobacco control at Public Health England (PHE), said there was a spectrum of opinion in the UK and US on e-cigarettes. San Francisco was very much “at one end of the spectrum – the abstinence-only, prohibition-style approach”, he said.

“Interestingly, they haven’t banned vaping cannabis. It’s still legal to vape cannabis and worse still, to smoke cannabis. It’s clear that the harm from smoking anything is much greater. Alcohol, smoked tobacco, cannabis, smoking or vaping – all of them are legal but the least harmful is e-cigarettes and they’ve banned them. Not just sales to young people, which we’ve done in this country, but for adults too. That is particularly difficult to understand.”

Source: The Guardian, 29 June 2019

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