ASH Daily News for 09 September 2016



  • Smoking in movies and smoking initiation in adolescents: systematic review and meta-analysis
  • Scotland: Smoke-free prisons will change attitudes and protect health
  • USA: Kansas City launches ‘Baby and Me Tobacco Free’ programme
  • USA: Appeals Court backs new trial in sick smoker case
  • Parliamentary Questions

Smoking in movies and smoking initiation in adolescents: systematic review and meta-analysis

There is strong evidence that exposure to smoking imagery in movies is associated with an increased risk of smoking uptake. This research looked to examine the magnitude of this effect.

Seventeen studies met the inclusion criteria. Random-effects meta-analysis of nine cross-sectional studies demonstrated higher exposure to smoking in movies was associated significantly with a doubling in risk of ever trying smoking. In eight longitudinal studies, higher exposure to smoking in movies was associated significantly with a 46% increased risk of initiating smoking.

The cross-sectional association between young people reporting having seen smoking imagery in films and smoking status is greater than the prospective association. Both associations are substantial, but it is unclear whether or not they are causal.

Source: Addiction – October 2016
Link: http://bit.ly/2cfxLb2


Scotland: Smoke-free prisons will change attitudes and protect health

ASH Scotland Chief Executive, Sheila Duffy, review the move towards smokefree prisons in Scotland.

Almost three-quarters of prisoners in Scotland smoke, more than three times the rate of smokers within the overall population. Yet as with the general population, the majority of people in prison who smoke say that they would prefer not to be smokers.

Scottish Prison Rules were amended in 2006 to restrict smoking to certain areas, to prison cells and outdoor recreation areas. In practice, however, the majority of prisoners can smoke in their cells provided the cell has been designated as a smoking cell by the governor.

However, since 2005, the Scottish Government has been committed to working towards a smokefree prison service, and in the five-year national strategy published in 2013 it committed to set out how indoor smokefree prison facilities will be delivered.

When Scotland’s indoor public spaces became smoke-free ten years ago, much of the media comment was about how damaging tobacco smoke is to people’s lungs and circulatory systems, and how it increases the risks of developing cancer. Tobacco smoke is no less dangerous today, and if properly implemented, having smoke-free Scottish prison buildings will go a long way towards changing attitudes to tobacco, and protecting people’s health.

Source: The Scotsman – 08 September 2016
Link: http://bit.ly/2cfyzNb


USA: Kansas City launches ‘Baby and Me Tobacco Free’ programme

Pregnant women can now trade in their cigarettes for free nappies and other supplies in Kansas City. The programme called, “Baby & Me Tobacco Free” was launched by the Unified Government Public Health Department on 1st September with the hope of supporting mothers and families to stop smoking.

The programme will host series of education sessions for expectant mothers relating to smoking, the tobacco industry, and support for quitting. All sessions will include a carbon monoxide reading so that mothers can see the positive effects of their quit attempt in real time. For up to a year after delivery, families can also come back to the health department for support including claiming nappy vouchers as long as they stay smokefree.

Source: KSHB – 08 September 2016
Link: http://bit.ly/2bWYn4R


USA: Appeals Court backs new trial in sick smoker case

A state appeals court has overturned a verdict in favour of cigarette maker Philip Morris USA and has ruled that some tobacco companies should receive a new trial in a case involving a woman who suffered smoking-related illnesses and.

David Cohen, whose wife, Helen, died after suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung cancer filed the lawsuit against Philip Morris, among others, for misrepresenting the dangers of smoking.

There will be a retrial of the case and the original direct verdict in favour of Philip Morris will be overturned.

Source: Health News Florida – 08 September 2016
Link: http://bit.ly/2cv8ITF


Parliamentary Questions

PQ1 Exercise duty

Philip Davies, Conservative, Shipley
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, what (a) internal and (b) externally commissioned research his Department has conducted on potential links between the levels of tax and illicit trade in the alcohol and tobacco sectors.

Jane Ellison The Financial Secretary to the Treasury
The government considers a number of different factors when deciding duty rates for alcohol and tobacco, including the impact on the illicit trade.
HMRC have published econometric analysis of cigarette and alcohol consumption, which can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/hm-revenue-and-customs-research-working-papers.

Source: Hansard (Citation: HC Deb, 8 September 2016, cW)
Link: http://bit.ly/2cyYj8i

Scottish Parliamentary Questions

PQ2: Convictions for underage sales

Jamie Greene, West Scotland, Scottish Conservative and Unionist Party
To ask the Scottish Government how many (a) prosecutions and (b) convictions there have been in each year since 2011 for the purchase of tobacco products by under-18-year-olds?

Michael Matheson, Cabinet Secretary for Justice
There were no prosecutions for the purchase of tobacco products by under 18-year-olds since 2011-12.

Source: http://bit.ly/2cb35ti

PQ3: Convictions for underage sales

Jamie Greene, West Scotland, Scottish Conservative and Unionist Party
To ask the Scottish Government how many (a) prosecutions and (b) convictions there have been in each year since 2007 for the sale of tobacco products to under-18-year-olds?

Michael Matheson, Cabinet Secretary for Justice
The number of people prosecuted and convicted in Scottish Courts for offences under the Children and Young Persons (Scotland) Act 1937 Section 18(1) and Tobacco and Primary Medical Services (Scotland) Act 2010 Section 4(1) is given in the following table (see link).

Source: http://bit.ly/2cb35ti