ASH Daily News for 08 September 2016



  • New Zealand: Standardised packaging given the go ahead
  • New Study: College educated more likely to use e-cigarettes to quit cigarette smoking
  • New study: Smoking in pregnancy could lead to an increased risk for Tourette syndrome and tic disorders
  • London: Two stopped in a year for smoking in cars with children
  • Wales: ‘Secret code words’ plan to smuggle tobacco into Swansea Prison
  • Is British American Tobacco really Britain’s best-run business?

New Zealand: Standardised packaging given the go ahead

Legislation requiring standardised packaging of tobacco products has been passed by Parliament in New Zealand. The bill was first introduced in 2013 but legal action by tobacco companies in Australia put it on hold.

Associate Health Minister Sam Lotu-Iiga said: “The bland packs will maximise the impact of health warnings and cut out any false impression that smoking is cool or glamorous.”

“Standardised packaging, along with the existing suite of tobacco control measures and quit-smoking services, is a logical next step towards the Smokefree 2025 goal.” Regulations required for law to come into force are under development following a public consultation that closed at the end of July.

Source: RNZ, 8 September 2016
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New Study: College educated more likely to use e-cigs to quit cigarette smoking

According to a new study by Georgia State University published in the journal Addictive Behaviors, dual users of e-cigarettes and and tobacco cigarettes may be more intent on quitting tobacco, but that intention seems to drop off among less educated smokers.

Researchers surveyed more than 1,200 smokers and found that those without college degrees were less likely to use electronic cigarettes in addition to smoking tobacco cigarettes but that dual users were more likely to have attempted to quit in the past year.

Michael Eriksen, professor and dean of the School of Public Health at Georgia State and an author of the study said: “We found that current smokers used ENDS with an intention to quit smoking cigarettes or reduce the use of combustible cigarettes. If ENDS use proves to be helpful for smoking cessation among long-term smokers, then interventions to improve access to ENDS among minority smokers and those with low levels of education may be needed.”

Full study: Pratibha Nayak, Terry F. Pechacek, Scott R. Weaver, Michael P. Eriksen. Electronic nicotine delivery system dual use and intention to quit smoking: Will the socioeconomic gap in smoking get greater? Addictive Behaviors, 2016

Source: Medical Xpress, September 7 2016
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New Study: Smoking in pregnancy could lead to an increased risk for Tourette syndrome and tic disorders

A study published the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry has found an association between smoking during pregnancy and an increased risk for Tourette syndrome and other chronic tic disorders.

Researchers used longitudinal data for 73,073 pregnancies collected in the Danish National Birth Cohort and the Danish national health registers to look at questions about the relationship between maternal smoking and chronic tic disorders (including Tourette syndrome) and paediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD).

The finding was most evident in the case of heavy maternal smoking (10 or more cigarettes a day) during pregnancy with a 66% increased risk for chronic tic disorders. Examination of data relating to childhood OCD showed similar trends but as not all children had passed the age of risk for the disorder, less certain conclusions can be drawn.

Full study: Prenatal Maternal Smoking and Increased Risk for Tourette Syndrome and Chronic Tic Disorders, Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (JAACAP) 2016

Source: Medical Xpress, 7 September 2016
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Is British American Tobacco really Britain’s best-run business?

British American Tobacco has topped The Institute of Directors and Cass Business School annual Good Governance Report, an annual league table which ranks FTSE 100 companies from best to worst. In Management Today, Jack Torrance highlights the result as testament to the difficulty of measuring good governance.

See also: British American Tobacco tops table for good governance, CNBC

Source: Management Today, 7 September 2016
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London: Two stopped in a year for smoking in cars with children

Figures from the Met police show that only two drivers in London have been warned about smoking in cars with children since a ban was introduced nearly a year ago. London Assembly member Steve O’Connell, who obtained the figures, said they showed the ban was unenforceable and called on the Mayor to look at other options to protect children from second-hand smoke in cars.

Dr Penny Woods, chief executive of the British Lung Foundation, said: “This legislation is about encouraging behavioural change. We hope the publicity around the new law has made people more aware of the dangers secondary smoke causes to children’s lung health… However, more research is needed to assess if the legislation is effective.”

When the law came in the National Police Chiefs’ Council said forces should take an “educational, advisory and non-confrontational approach” and a Met spokesman said the force has been following this advice.

Source: Evening Standard, 7 September 2016
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Wales: ‘Secret code words’ plan to smuggle tobacco into Swansea Prison

A women has been caught planning to smuggle tobacco into Swansea Prison after police listened in to a phone with her inmate husband which used “code words” including “bags of straw”, “rolls of wallpaper” and “light bulbs”.

When the 52-year-old was subsequently approached by staff during a visit to Swansea prison she was found to have tobacco, cigarette papers and a lighter wrapped in cling wrap and hidden in the waistband of her trousers. She was fined £300, and was ordered to pay £85 costs and a £30 surcharge.

Source: South Wales Evening Post, 7 September 2016
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