ASH Daily News for 08 November 2016



  • Groups demand tobacco lobbyist stops claiming links
  • Why is heart disease still killing millions every year?
  • E-cigarette use in public places: striking the right balance
  • Middlesbrough: Smokers warned of risk to children’s health
  • Research suggests e-cigarette vapour does not induce genetic mutations associated with cigarette smoke exposure
  • COP7: Sri Lanka to introduce plain packaging
  • Nigeria: Tobacco control groups turn to billboard messages

Groups demand tobacco lobbyist stops claiming links

Nestlé and the World Bank are among a number of organisations demanding that a controversial lobby group for tobacco companies stops claiming links to them.

The International Tax and Investment Centre (ITIC), claims on its website to work closely with organisations including the World Bank and lists the UK Department for International Development and Nestlé among its sponsors. However, when contacted regarding the claims these organisations stated they had no ongoing relationships with ITIC.

In 2014 ITIC was publically denounced by the World Health Organisation (WHO) for promoting “false” information on behalf of the tobacco industry. Around this time organisations including the World Bank and Nestlé ceased working with ITIC or attending events it sponsored.

Source: The Financial Times – 07 November 2016
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Why is heart disease still killing millions every year?

Opinion piece from Lord Darzi on cardiovascular disease.

The global burden of morbidity from cardiovascular disease (CVD) is rising, and has risen 40% over the last 25 years.

The World Health Organisation (WHO) and World Heart Federation argue that morbidity from CVD could be tackled by a three pronged approach of reducing smoking rates, cutting high blood pressure and providing secondary prevention such as medication to those already suffering. However, policy makers have been slow to pick this up.

Lord Darzi makes the argument that while these are conditions that kill people, policymakers rarely make CVD prevention a major focus for attention, despite the high health and economic burden and unnecessary loss of life.

While some countries and other researchers are leading the way and working on innovative prevention and education programmes, the burden of CVD worldwide cannot be addressed without sustained political and financial support.

Source: The Guardian – 08 November 2016
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E-cigarette use in public places: striking the right balance

Professor Linda Bauld and colleagues have given thier perspective on regulation of e-cigarettes based on current evidence.

Since the emergence of e-cigarettes countries have taken different approaches to legislating on use of the devices within public places. The UK has taken the decision not to ban use of e-cigarettes within public places and workplaces based on three central considerations: is e-cigarette vapour harmful, what impact could a ban have on smoking behaviour, and what are the views of stakeholders?

The authors argue that in considering the research base it is clear at present that the evidence does not support a policy to prohibit e-cigarette use in enclosed public places and such policies could have significant unintended consequences by sustaining the use of smoked tobacco. However, it is important to continue to research the impact of vapour and consider how varying policies impact on e-cigarette use.

Source: Tobacco Control – 07 November 2016
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Middlesbrough: Smokers warned of risk to children’s health

A new campaign has been launched to raise awareness of the effects of secondhand smoke on children. Middlesbrough’s Smokefree Alliance has joined forces with Grassroots Football to promote the campaign and encourage adults not to light up around children especially when they’re playing sport.

Source: The Northern Echo – 07 November 2016
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Research suggests e-cigarette vapour does not induce genetic mutations associated with cigarette smoke exposure

Researchers for tobacco company British American Tobacco (BAT) have compared the mutagenic potential of cigarette smoke and vapour from BAT’s Vype e-Pen product.

Researchers trapped particulate matter from smoke or vapour on a filter pad and then washed the pad with a solvent to produce a stock solution that could be diluted into various concentrations. They then exposed the test bacteria to the same concentrations of either smoke or vapour extract. They also exposed test bacteria to freshly generated smoke or e-cigarette vapour.

Cigarette smoke was seen to cause bacterial mutations, and at larger levels as the exposure level increased. In contrast exposure to vapour did not produce an effect on the bacteria and no mutations were observed even after three hours of continuous exposure.

Source: Medical X Press – 04 November 2016
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COP7: Sri Lanka to introduce plain packaging

In a speech at the Conference of the Parties to the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control, Sri Lankan President Maithripala Sirisena has urged Parties to continue to apply downward pressure on smoking rates and not give into pressure from the tobacco industry.

President Sirisena committed to Sri Lanka introducing standardised ‘plain’ packaging for tobacco products and urged the FCTC to address the issue of smokeless tobacco, prevalence of which is high in Sri Lanka and across the South Asian region.

See also:
– Sri Lanka President address in COP7 at India Expo Mart Greater Noida, Tennews

Source: Gulf Times – 08 November 2016
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Nigeria: Tobacco control groups turn to billboard messages

On Thursday, 3rd November, tobacco control activists unveiled a billboard to press home calls for regulations to implement the National Tobacco Control Act 2015.

The unveiling coincides with the Federal Health Ministry beginning discussion into what regulations will ensure effective implementation of the Act.

Source: Premium Times – 04 November 2016
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