ASH Daily News for 08 March 2019



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UK

  • North East back campaign to increase legal smoking age to 21

International

  • USA: Study looks at heart disease amongst ex smokers who vape
  • New Zealand: PMI to stop selling cigarettes

 

UK

North East back campaign to increase legal smoking age to 21

The measure to increase the legal age of tobacco sale from 18 to 21, put forward by the All Party Parliamentary Group on Smoking and Health, is being backed by campaign group Fresh alongside 17 other health and welfare organisations based in the region.

The call to raise the age of tobacco sale is part of a range of measures designed to operate as an integrated strategy to help reduce the prevalence of smoking.

Ailsa Rutter, director of Fresh, said: “Tobacco smoking is still our biggest killer with thousands of children continuing to get addicted every year and half of all lifelong smokers dying early from this addiction”.

Source: Chronicle Live, 6 March 2019

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International

USA: Study looks at heart disease amongst ex smokers who vape

A study by the University of Kansas has found that e-cigarette users, who are either ex or current smokers, are 34% more likely to suffer from cardiovascular disease compared to non smokers. This association was held after accounting for other cardiovascular risk factors such as age, sex, BMI, high blood pressure and smoking. No comparison was made between people who only smoke and don’t vape.

Researchers have said this study was unable to determine whether the increased risk was attributed to current e-cigarette use or past or current tobacco consumption.

Dr Vindhyal, lead author of the study has said “Cigarette smoking carries a much higher probability of heart attack and stroke than e-cigarettes, but that doesn’t mean that vaping is safe”.

Source: The Telegraph, 7 March 2019

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New Zealand: PMI to stop selling cigarettes

Philip Morris International has announced that it will stop selling cigarettes in New Zealand and instead it will only sell heated tobacco products. However, they argue they cannot do this immediately and lower taxes for their heated tobacco products would allow them to exit the market quicker.

Action on Smoking and Health spokesman Ben Youdan agreed smokefree products should be taxed less. He said “I do think that a sensible regulatory regime … would disadvantage the most harmful products over others.” But points out that PMI’s plan to stop selling cigarettes would not have a huge impact on their business or smoking rates as their share of the market was so small.

A spokesperson from the Ministry of Health said they were currently unaware of PMI’s plans to stop selling cigarettes.

Source: News Now, 6 March 2019

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