ASH Daily News 9 June 2017



  • Safety advice given after e-cigarette fire
  • Lancashire: The smoking-related death rate has fallen but is still the second highest
  • Canada: Study finds failure to sustain reductions in carcinogens in cigarettes
  • India: Youth find tobacco products less appealing

 

Safety advice given after e-cigarette fire

A Lancashire resident’s e-cigarette caught fire when plugged in.

Following a string of electronic cigarette-related fires across the UK, the government issued several measures to boost safety in the wake of the increasing concerns. Tips included not overloading plug sockets, making sure e-cigarettes are always switched off when not in use, checking for product recalls and looking for the CE mark that indicates chargers comply with European Safety standards.

Source: Wigan Today, 8 June 2017
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Lancashire: The smoking-related death rate has fallen but is still the second highest

Figures produced by Lancashire County Council (LCC) show that of the total bill, £3.3m is a direct cost of smoking-related ill health treatment while £200,000 is spent treating the effects of passive smoking on non-smokers.

Hyndburn also currently has the second highest smoking death rate in Lancashire, and the picture is significantly worse than the local averages. The council says smoking also ‘disproportionately affects those disadvantaged by poverty’ and is a ‘major contributor to health inequalities’.

Source: Accrington Observer, 8 June 2017
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Canada: Study finds failure to sustain reductions in carcinogens in cigarettes

Tobacco-specific nitrosamines (TSNAs) are potent carcinogens formed predominantly during the cigarette manufacturing process. Despite initial success lowering TSNA levels in cigarettes sold in Canada, following subsidies by the Ontario government to manufacturers in 2000, a study published today in the journal Nicotine & Tobacco Research has found that the decrease in TSNAs have not been sustained.

Following initial reductions, TSNA levels in cigarettes sold in Canada consistently increased after 2007. By 2012, the levels were 2 to 40 times higher than those observed in 2007.

See More:

Oxford Academic: Trends over time in tobacco-specific nitrosamines (TSNAs) in whole tobacco and smoke emissions from cigarettes sold in Canada

Source: Scienmag, 8 June 2017
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India: Youth find tobacco products less appealing

The latest Global Adult Tobacco Survey (GATS) has found that tobacco users have reduced, especially among the 15 to 24 age group, and that pictorial health warnings are very effective.

As per the report released on Thursday, over 61.9% adults thought of quitting cigarettes, 53.8% thought of quitting bidi and 46.2 per cent adults thought of quitting smokeless tobacco because of the warnings on tobacco products, the survey found.

GATS 2016-17 was conducted by the Union health ministry with technical assistance from the World Health Organisation (WHO) and Centres for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), US.

Source: DNA, 9 June 2017
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