ASH Daily News 9 February 2018



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UK

Study suggets that vape shops on the high street may help smokers quit
North West: New data reveals smoking rates across Greater Manchester
London: Almost 23,000 fake cigarettes seized in Royal Greenwich

International

Turkey: Fresh data shows citizens spent $154bn on tobacco over the last decade
New Zealand: Study reveals difficulties some smokers have in switching to e-cigarettes
USA: Study shows effects of third-hand smoke in casinos

Parliamentary Activity

Parliamentary Questions

 

UK

Study suggests that vape shops on the high street may help smokers quit

New research has suggested that specialised high street vape shops may help reduce smoking rates by providing effective behavioural support to quit.

Researchers at the University of East Anglia conducted interviews with 40 people who switched to e-cigarettes in order to quit smoking. The study also saw researchers work with six shops in a range of locations to observe interactions between staff and customers.

Lead researcher Dr Emma Ward, from UEA’s Norwich Medical School, said: “We found that vape shops provided effective behavioural support to help quitters stay smoke free. Shop assistants were really keen to understand customers’ smoking preferences and give tailored advice about the most appropriate products. And they were an ongoing point of contact for practical help”.

Martin Dockrell, tobacco lead at PHE, commented: “Specialist vape shops have valuable expertise and product knowledge to offer smokers who want to quit with the help of an e-cigarette”.

“We’ve seen some great examples of these retailers working in partnership with their local stop smoking service to offer smokers a wrap-around package, with tailored behavioural support and practical advice on choosing the right product and getting the best out of it”.

See also:
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health: A Qualitative Exploration of the Role of Vape Shop Environments in Supporting Smoking Abstinence

Source: The Daily Mail, 9 February 2018
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North West: New data reveals smoking rates across Greater Manchester

The latest GP Patient Survey, an independent survey run by Ipsos MORI on behalf of NHS England, has revealed that people across Greater Manchester are among the most likely people to smoke in the country.

Around 17.5% of people across the region are smokers, according to the new figures. The highest figure for the region was 19%, shared by both Oldham and Rochdale. Both of these figures were higher than the average of 16% of people in England who smoke regularly or occasionally, according to the study.

Eddie Moores, Cabinet Member for Health and Wellbeing at Oldham Council, said: “We’re committed to reducing the number of smokers in Oldham and treat it as a real priority. A person’s overall health can improve significantly when they stop smoking which eases pressure on health services. Last year we supported 637 quit attempts in Oldham. It often takes people several quit attempts to become a longer term quitter… Combining behavioural support with stop smoking treatments, such as nicotine replacement therapy, means that you’re four times more likely to quit”.

Source: Manchester Evening News, 8 February 2018
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London: Almost 23,000 illicit cigarettes seized in Royal Greenwich

22,800 illicit cigarettes illegally shipped to a mail box address in Royal Greenwich have been seized by Trading Standards Officers.

The action was carried out as part of the local council’s attempt to stamp out the trade in illicit tobacco, which has proven links to organised criminal gangs.

Councillor Jackie Smith, Cabinet Member for Community Safety and Environment, said: “This is great work in our fight against the availability of illegal tobacco. The trade supports other criminal activity in our communities such as drug dealing which is why it is vital that we stamp down heavily on it. The low price tag might appear attractive but the true cost to people and the community is high”.

Source: royalgreenwich.gov, 8 February 2018
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International

Turkey: Fresh data shows citizens spent $154bn on tobacco over the last decade

Data released by the Turkish government has shown that over 1 trillion cigarettes costing around $154 billion were consumed in Turkey over the last decade.

Cigarette consumption in Turkey has dropped slightly, but spending rose in the years between 2008 and 2017, mainly due to increased taxes on tobacco products.

In 2005, Turkey’s rate of tobacco product usage for men over 15 was 51.5% and 16.7% for females, but by 2015 these rates had fallen to 39.5% and 12.4% respectively, according to World Health Organization (WHO) data.

Turkey has restricted tobacco use in enclosed public spaces since 2008 and required warning labels on tobacco products since 2010.

Source: Daily Sabah, 8 February 2018
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New Zealand: Study reveals difficulties some smokers have in switching to e-cigarettes

A new study of vapers who also smoked combustible cigarettes has explored why some of these smokers did not make a full transition to vaping.

Dr. Lindsay Robertson, the lead researcher on the study, stated that the main reason this group of vapers did not stop smoking completely was a strong attachment to, and a sense of nostalgia for, what they described as ‘real’ cigarettes.

She stated: “Many started their quit attempt expecting that vaping would offer them exactly the same experience as smoking. However, they often became disappointed when their experiences didn’t replicate smoking, and continued smoking as well as vaping”.

The researchers suggested that a way of addressing this issue could be to manage smokers’ expectations more carefully and that this would include ensuring smokers who want to switch to vaping receive good advice from well-trained retailers with specialist vaping knowledge.

See also:
Tobacco Control: Dual use of electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS) and smoked tobacco: a qualitative analysis

Source: Medical Xpress, February 8 2018
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USA: Study shows effects of third-hand smoke in casinos

Researchers from San Diego State university have found that decades of heavy smoking in casinos caused build-ups of toxic third-hand smoke on walls, furniture, and carpets.

The presence of third-hand smoke declined after smoking was banned in a Northern California casino, but six months later residue still remained above levels found in formerly smoke-friendly hotels or private homes where bans had been introduced.

Lead study author and psychologist Dr Georg Matt said: “The casino was much more polluted with third-hand smoke than any nonsmoker home we have examined to date. That is, nonsmokers are at risk of being exposed to higher concentration of thirdhand smoke in a casino than they would in a thirdhand smoke-polluted home”.

Most public spaces in the US now have laws against smoking indoors in order to protect public health, but several states allow ‘adult venues’ such as casinos to allow smoking indoors.

See also:
Tobacco Control: A Casino goes smoke free: a longitudinal study of secondhand and thirdhand smoke pollution and exposure

Source: The Daily Mail, 8 February 2018
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Parliamentary Activity

Parliamentary Questions

PQ1: World Conference on Tobacco or Health
Philip Davies, Conservative (Shipley)
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether a delegation from his Department or any Departmental agency plans to attend the 17th World Conference on Tobacco or Health in Cape Town; and if he will make a statement.

Steve Brine, Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for Public Health and Primary Care
As a recognised world leader in tobacco control, the Department and Public Health England (PHE) will send a delegation to the 17th World Conference on Tobacco or Health, scheduled to take place in Cape Town, South Africa in March 2018. The Department’s representative will speak at several events during the conference to talk about the United Kingdom’s tobacco control strategy, as well as attending a meeting of the Global Tobacco Regulators Forum before the Conference begins.

Source: Hansard, HC Debate, 8 February

PQ2: Smokefree NHS
Sir Michael Fallon, Conservative (Sevenoaks)
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will ban smoking on all NHS premises.

Steve Brine, Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for Public Health and Primary Care
The Department supports the implementation of smokefree policies across all hospitals in England. The Government’s tobacco control plan for England published in July 2017 reiterates our ambition to achieve smokefree mental health services by the end of 2018 and to see all National Health Service estates becoming smoke-free by 2019/20, as set out in NHS England’s ‘Next steps on the NHS Five Year Forward View’ mandate.

Source: Hansard, HC Debate, 8 February

PQ3: Funding for tobacco control work
Lord Rennard
To ask Her Majesty’s Government which countries are in receipt of UK Government funding for tobacco control work, including implementation of the provisions of the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control.

Lord O’Shaughnessy, Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Health
The United Kingdom Government is investing £15 million of Official Development Assistance funds to promote the implementation of the World Health Organization Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (WHO FCTC) through the FCTC 2030 project. The five year project, being led by the FCTC secretariat in Geneva, is currently in its second year.

Through an open and fair process, fifteen countries have been selected to receive direct support under the project. The countries are: Burma, Cabo Verde, Cambodia, Chad, Colombia, Egypt, El Salvador, Georgia, Jordan, Madagascar, Nepal, Samoa, Sierra Leone, Sri Lanka and Zambia.

Source: Hansard, HL Debate, 8 February

PQ4: Tobacco Industry Assistance
Lord Rennard
To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether any UK overseas posts have provided assistance to the tobacco industry in countries in receipt of UK Government funding for tobacco control activity, including funding to support implementation of the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control, since the issuing of revised guidance to posts in December 2013.

Lord O’Shaughnessy, Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Health
The UK Government and UK officials overseas are committed to limiting interactions with the tobacco industry as part of Her Majesty’s Government’s obligations under the FCTC. Posts have engaged with the tobacco industry, but will not engage with foreign governments on behalf of the tobacco industry except in cases where local policies could be considered protectionist or discriminatory.

Source: Hansard, HL Debate, 8 February