ASH Daily News 7 September 2017



UK

  • Smoking cessation for surgery: putting it into practice
  • South West: Patients to be asked to quit before surgery in Bath
  • Sussex: Football club to go smokefree

International

  • India: Cancer specialist asks Government for tobacco industry probe

 

UK
Smoking cessation for surgery: putting it into practice

Although guidelines recommend that all patients at hospital who use tobacco are offered treatment as a part of their clinical care, implementing treatment has proven challenging.

In the case of surgical patients, this lack of treatment is particularly problematic, as the benefits of abstinence from tobacco are immediate in terms of reducing the risk of surgical complications.

Source: BMJ, 6 September 2017
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South West: Patients to be asked to quit before surgery in Bath

Patients facing surgery are to be asked to stop smoking before their operation in Bath and North East Somerset.

Starting next month, the initiative will be rolled out to improve how well patients fare after surgery. Those facing hip and knee surgery will be first to be invited to stop smoking before the scheme is extended to all types of surgery.

The plans come after the area’s Health and Wellbeing Board reviewed evidence that smokers are nearly 40% more likely to die after surgery, with smoking linked to complications such as infection after surgery.

Source: Bath Chronicle, 6 September 2017
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Sussex: Football club to go smokefree

A campaign has been launched to make a Sussex football team become a smokefree club. The ambitious aim by Crawley Town FC is to get all its fans and staff to kick the habit and boost their health.

The scheme is backed by Crawley Mayor Brian Quinn who said: “It’s great to see private businesses being proactive in solving local issues across Crawley.”

Source: The Argus, 7 September 2017
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International
India: Cancer specialist asks Government for tobacco industry probe

A leading cancer specialist has called on the government to investigate whether a “tobacco lobby” has influenced arms of the government to initiate action against public health organisations engaged in India’s tobacco control efforts.

Kailash Sharma, director of academics at the Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai, has cited leaked government and tobacco industry documents to seek the probe. His appeal comes after the home ministry decided to bar three public health institutions working with the health ministry on tobacco control efforts from receiving foreign funds.

“While the tobacco industry lobbies to enhance business, public health activities are lobbying to save [people] from death, disease and deprivation,” Sharma wrote in letters to Prime Minister Narendra Modi, the home minister, health minister, and national security adviser.

Source: Telegraph India, 6 September 2017
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