ASH Daily News 6 November 2017



UK

  • Five million adults have tried to stop smoking in the last year
  • Q&A: Has the smoking ban had an effect on deaths from lung cancer dropping?
  • Philip Morris funded research says England could be smokefree by 2040
  • Birmingham: 40,000 healthcare professionals trained to help smokers quit
  • Northern Ireland: Councillor appeals to public to heed no smoking signs at Altnagelvin Hospital
  • Wales: Premature coronary heart disease deaths ‘cut by 70%’

 

UK

Five million adults have tried to stop smoking in the last year

A study from V2 Cigs UK, a vape company, found approximately five million adults have attempted to stop smoking in the past year. The most common reason (61%) for quitting among survey respondents was to be healthier, followed by 13% who wanted to save money.

One fifth of Brits who took part in the study said they had tried vaping in a quit attempt – and the number is quickly catching up on the quarter who smoke traditional cigarettes. According to Action on Smoking and Health, the number of people vaping has quadrupled in the last five years.

Source: The Scottish Sun, 3 November 2017
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Q&A: Has the smoking ban had an effect on deaths from lung cancer dropping?

Q – It’s been several years now since the smoking ban came into force in public places. I was wondering, has it had any effect on deaths from lung cancer dropping?

A – The figures suggest it has indeed had a beneficial effect. The ban was introduced in 2007 when the rate of lung cancer deaths in the UK was 66.2 per 100,000 deaths. In 2014, that figure was down to 61.4 per 100,000.

The overall figures are largely explained by the fact that over the past decade the number of people who smoke has fallen from 21% to 16% of the population

Source: Express, 4 November 2017
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Philip Morris funded research says England could be smokefree by 2040

A Frontier Economics study funded by tobacco company Philip Morris Ltd says if an extra 210,000 quit each year, England could be smokefree as early as 2029.

Source: The Sun, 4 November 2017
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Birmingham: 40,000 healthcare professionals trained to help smokers quit

Public Health England (PHE) confirmed that nearly 40,000 healthcare professionals have been trained to offer quit smoking advice as part of a drive to make the NHS smoke-free by 2019. An event last week in Birmingham, held by PHE, promoted the new government tobacco control plan to stop-smoking workers across the country.

In support of the plan, PHE is urging all NHS frontline staff to take advantage of free online training to help them give ‘very brief advice on smoking’ (VBA). The evidence shows that giving VBA to patients makes them 68% more likely to quit if they’re offered stop smoking medication. So far, 39,447 healthcare professionals have been trained to deliver effective stop smoking advice.

Source: WiredGov, 4 November 2017
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Northern Ireland: Councillor appeals to public to heed no smoking signs at Altnagelvin Hospital

Sinn Féin Health spokesperson Councillor Patricia Logue has urged visitors to Altnagelvin Hospital to adhere to the smokefree policy.

She said: “I welcome this initiative by Altnagelvin Hospital to highlight the dangers of smoking and would ask people to adhere to the no smoking policy which was introduced in 2015.”

Source: Derry Daily, 4 November 2017
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Wales: Premature coronary heart disease deaths cut by 70%

The number of people dying prematurely from coronary heart disease in Wales has been cut by nearly 70% in the past 20 years, according to the Welsh Government’s Annual Statement of Progress on Heart Disease report.

Cardiovascular (heart and circulatory) disease is the biggest killer in Wales, with more than 9,000 deaths each year. The report said this was due to the improved detection of heart disease among GPs, the ban on smoking in public places and other public health interventions, and better NHS treatments.

Source: BBC, 6 November 2017
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