ASH Daily News 6 June 2017



  • New packaging laws see fall in cigarette sales
  • Small retailer John McClurey discusses the positives of tobacco control
  • Opinion piece: The success of public health law in Wales
  • USA: Researchers find pictorial warning labels on tobacco products help improve communication of risks to smokers
  • New Zealand: Study finds smoking while pregnant can cause dental problems for children

 

New packaging laws see fall in cigarette sales

Cigarette retailers have seen a dip in sales since laws enforcing plain packaging were introduced, according to a recent report in The Grocer magazine.

The ban on packets of 10 cigarettes has caused sales to drop since the new rules were introduced on May 20, alongside the new graphic health warnings on standardised packs.

Source: The Scotsman, 5 June 2017
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Small retailer John McClurey discusses the positives of tobacco control

“There’s a lot of mythology surrounding the relationship between small retailers and the tobacco industry. Tobacco companies try to tell me that I make a lot of money from selling cigarettes, and that if it weren’t for people coming into my shop for their smoking materials I’d have very little business. This is so far from the truth as to be almost funny. It’s true that there’s big money to be made from tobacco, but it’s not made by me — it’s made by the tobacco manufacturers. The trouble is, many of my fellow retailers fall for the tobacco manufacturers’ hype.

The truth is that selling tobacco for me is a burden not a benefit and one I wish I didn’t have to shoulder. I have to tie up lots of money in stock — money which I could spend more usefully elsewhere, and space which I could put to better use.

I’m glad tobacco sales are going down, as the demand for tobacco is falling, I can use the high value space in my shop to give people what they want, and I can make more money. I can spend less money on tobacco stock and diversify, and try new things which are more profitable and much less harmful.”

Source: Medium, 5 June 2017
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Opinion piece: The success of public health law in Wales

“Wales is about to become the first country to put health first in all public decisions. A new act plans to make it a healthier place, where physical and mental well-being are maximised and where choices and behaviours that benefit future health are understood.

Wales is no stranger to being the first of the UK nations to enforce legislation that benefits both human health and the environment. In 2015, a ban on smoking in cars with passengers aged under 18 years old was enacted, which was again followed by their English neighbours. Scotland enforced a similar law a year later, while Northern Ireland has recently completed a consultation on its provision.”

Source: The Independent, 5 June 2017
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USA: Researchers find pictorial warning labels on tobacco products help improve communication of risks to smokers

In a new study published recently in Tobacco Control, researchers from the University of Pennsylvania found that health warning labels that include images or pictorial warnings are more effective in gaining and holding the attention of smokers when the image and the text convey similar risks.

‘Adopting pictorial warning labels on tobacco products would be an improvement in communicating risk compared to the text-only versions currently on domestic packaging. This is an important and effective way to disseminate knowledge about health risks,’ said Andrew A. Strasser, one of the leaders of the study.

In the US, health warnings with pictures have been contested through the courts by the tobacco industry.

See also: BMJ: Effect of message congruency on attention and recall in pictorial health warning labels.

Source: Medical Xpress, 5 June 2017
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New Zealand: Study finds smoking while pregnant can cause dental problems for children

Women who continue to smoke while pregnant may be increasing the likelihood of their children experiencing dental problems.

This is according to a new study from the University of Otago, which indicated that women who smoke more than ten cigarettes a day during pregnancy are much more likely to give birth to babies who will fail to grow all their teeth.

The condition is known as hypodontia, and sees children failing to develop up to six permanent teeth – usually the lateral incisors and premolars.

See also: Journal of Dental Research: Maternal Smoking during Pregnancy Is Associated with Offspring Hypodontia.

Source: Zenopa, 5 June 2017
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