ASH Daily News 6 April 2018



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UK

  • South Yorkshire: Firefighters support smokers in quitting campaign
  • Durham: 94,000 illegal cigarettes seized in the last 12 months
  • Scotland: Time to help employees stub it out

International

  • USA: Kids are being sold cigarettes and e-cigarettes on Facebook despite policy ban
  • India:‘QuitLine’ on cigarette packs to help people stop smoking

 

UK

South Yorkshire: Firefighters support smokers in quitting campaign

South Yorkshire Fire & Rescue (SYFR) is working in partnership with South West Yorkshire Partnership NHS Trust, to provide a meeting group once a week at Adwick station to help support residents to stop smoking.

The Stop Smoking sessions will offer a wide range of support which will aid all sorts of smokers, even those who have been smoking for long periods of time and may think that they wouldn’t be able to give up.

Steve Helps, Head of Prevention and Protection at SYFR said; “Smoking is the biggest cause of preventable disease and premature deaths in the UK. It is also a major cause of accidental death, injury and property damage from house fires attributed to smoking in the UK every year. This initiative is a positive step towards keeping the people of South Yorkshire healthier and safer in their own homes.”

Source: The Star, 5 April 2018
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Durham: 94,000 illegal cigarettes seized in the last 12 months

An annual report shows council’s consumer protection team’s enforcement activities have been successful over the past year with 94,000 illegal cigarettes seized by officers in County Durham. The report included its first ever closure of a premises for the repeated sale of illicit tobacco.

Councillor Brian Stephens stated that “obtaining its first closure against a premises which was engaging in criminal activity was a notable success and it’s fantastic that more than 400 retailers have now been giving training on age related products.”

Source: The Northern Echo, 6 April 2018
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Scotland: Time to help employees stub it out

According to ASH Scotland, the NHS spends £271million per year on smoking-attributable disease, and productivity losses due to excess absenteeism, smoking breaks and lost output due to premature death, costs £692million per year.

Employers are in a strong position to support this particular health agenda because a smokefree working environment encourages people who smoke to quit. Employers have the ability to reach large numbers of people and support them in many ways, including: advice from a health professional; the provision of self-help guides to giving up smoking; free or subsidised nicotine-replacement therapy (NRT) such as gum or patches, as is available on most offshore installations; or employees could be offered paid time off to attend relevant courses.

Source: Energy Voice, 6 April 2018
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International

USA: Kids are being sold cigarettes and e-cigarettes on Facebook despite policy ban

Smoking products are being marketed and sold on the social media site – despite tobacco sales and advertising being banned by Facebook. Researchers from Stanford University found sponsored pages allowed cigarette, hookah and vape sellers to indirectly promote their products, and that many sellers are failing to check the age of potential buyers. Lead researcher Dr Robert Jackler said Facebook must do more to tackle loopholes.

Source: The Sun, 5 April 2018
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India: ‘QuitLine’ on cigarette packs to help people quit smoking

The Mumbai Union Health and Family Welfare Ministry has issued a notification to print a help line number titled ‘QuitLine’ on tobacco packets. Along with a helpline number to quit smoking, the government has asked the tobacco manufactures to put two sets of pictorial warnings on packs.

The Government has introduced this initiative after analysing results from a Global Adult Tobacco Survey (GATS) report in 2017, which indicated that 62% of cigarette smokers, 54% of bidi smokers (hand-rolled cigarettes made of tobacco and wrapped in tendu or temburni leaf) and 46% of smokeless tobacco users thought about quitting because of pictorial warning on the products.

Source: The Asian Age, 5 April 2018
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